Top News

  • November 26, 2014

    Motorola's $3.5B LCD Price-Fixing Claim Tossed By 7th Circ.

    Motorola Mobility LLC cannot sue for $3.5 billion in U.S. court over liquid-crystal display panels its foreign subsidiaries bought from an alleged price-fixing cartel of tech companies including Samsung Electronics Co., Toshiba Corp. and Sanyo Consumer Electronics Co. Ltd., U.S. Circuit Judge Richard Posner said in an opinion released Wednesday.

  • November 26, 2014

    EU Regulators Push Google To Scrub Links From All Domains

    Europe’s privacy regulators said Wednesday that search engines such as Google Inc. must delete links to contested search results on a global basis and not just from EU domains in order to comply with a recent high court ruling that sanctioned users' right to request the deletion.

  • November 26, 2014

    EPA Unveils Stricter Limits On Ozone Levels

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday unveiled stricter new outdoor air quality standards for ozone that could carry billions of dollars in compliance costs, proposing to drop acceptable levels from 75 parts per billion to between 65 and 70 parts per billion.

  • November 25, 2014

    Judge Tosses $105M Patent Verdict Against Fairchild

    A California federal judge Tuesday tossed a jury's $105 million verdict against Fairchild Semiconductor International Inc. and ordered a new trial on damages for Power Integrations Inc.'s claims that Fairchild infringed two power-supply patents, saying jurors didn't decide the award based solely on the patented features.

  • November 25, 2014

    Supreme Court To Hear Challenge To EPA Mercury Rule

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to review the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rule limiting mercury and other toxic emissions from power plants, granting requests from 23 states and industry groups that have argued the rule would drive up electricity prices and harm the coal industry.

  • November 25, 2014

    FDA Releases Long-Awaited Menu Labeling Rules

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued final rules Tuesday that require chain restaurants, grocery stores and other food establishments to list caloric information on menus, long-awaited regulations intended to provide consumers with easily understood health information about their dietary choices.

  • November 25, 2014

    BofA Escapes $56M Mortgage Bond Suit In 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday refused to revive a German bank's suit alleging Bank of America Corp. duped it into investing $56 million in shoddy mortgage bonds before the 2008 financial crisis.

  • November 24, 2014

    Honda Failed To Report 1,729 Deaths And Injuries Since 2003

    Since 2003, Honda Motor Co. has failed to report 1,729 deaths and injuries to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the company announced on Monday after it sent the results of a third-party audit to the agency.

  • November 24, 2014

    Ex-Longtop Exec Faces $5M Penalty After Trial Loss, Atty Says

    A former Longtop Financial Technologies Ltd. executive could pay around $5 million in damages after a New York federal jury found him liable in a rare securities class action trial over the Chinese software company's accounting shenanigans, a plaintiffs' attorney said Monday.

  • November 24, 2014

    AstraZeneca Can't End Nexium Pay-For-Delay Trial

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Monday refused to allow AstraZeneca PLC and Ranbaxy Inc. to end a pay-for-delay trial over the heartburn drug Nexium, saying the case should go before a jury, while Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. opted to settle with the plaintiffs.

  • November 24, 2014

    Hagel Steps Down, But Will Serve Until Successor In Place

    President Barack Obama announced Monday that embattled Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has resigned from his post, but will stay on until his successor has been confirmed.

  • November 24, 2014

    FINRA Fines Citigroup $15M For Analyst Supervision Failures

    The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority on Monday said it has fined Citigroup Global Markets Inc. $15 million for failing to adequately supervise its equity market research analysts, whom the regulator said gave improper tips at so-called “idea dinners” with clients but weren’t adequately punished for violating the bank’s policies.

  • November 24, 2014

    Britain's BT In Talks For $10B Mobile Provider O2

    British cable company BT PLC confirmed Monday it is in early takeover talks with a pair of U.K. mobile providers, including Telefonica SA's O2 unit, potentially setting up another blockbuster tie-up in a European telecom sector teetering toward mass consolidation.

  • November 21, 2014

    Aereo's Gone, But Internet TV Is Here To Stay

    Aereo Inc. ended its three-year copyright battle with a bankruptcy filing, but the trend that the streaming startup so publicly represented — the increasing popularity of novel, Internet-based services for access to video content — isn't going anywhere.

  • November 21, 2014

    $590M LBO Settlement Filed In Error, Judge Says

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Friday vacated a set of electronic orders granting final approval to $590 million in settlements in a class action claiming Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Carlyle Group LP and several other private equity firms teamed up to keep leveraged buyout prices low, just hours after issuing a set of orders approving the settlement and a request for attorneys’ fees.

  • November 21, 2014

    EPA Puts Off 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard To 2015

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday it will not be finalizing 2014 volume standard under the Renewable Fuel Standard program before the end of this year, a move that reflects controversy between the ethanol and oil industries about how volumes should be set in light of lower-than-predicted gasoline consumption.

  • November 21, 2014

    GOP Hits Obama With Long-Awaited ACA Lawsuit

    The Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives on Friday filed a long-awaited lawsuit against the Obama administration challenging delay of the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate and government payments to health insurance companies under the law.

  • November 21, 2014

    Aereo Files For Ch. 11 In Bid To Dodge Copyright Suits

    TV streaming service Aereo Inc., whose targeted signals were ruled by the U.S. Supreme Court in June to violate copyrights by retransmitting broadcasts without permission, filed for bankruptcy in a move CEO Chet Kanojia said Friday would allow it to avoid civil copyright litigation liability.

  • November 20, 2014

    Obama Announces Bold New Immigration Actions

    President Obama on Thursday said he would take executive action to allow certain undocumented immigrants with children to remain in the U.S., while beefing up border security and making it easier for highly skilled workers and graduates to stay in the country.

  • November 20, 2014

    Ex-CEO Of Massey Coal Pleads Not Guilty In Mine Blast

    Ex-Massey Energy Co. CEO Don Blankenship reportedly pled not guilty in West Virginia federal court Thursday to criminal charges of spurring on the safety failures found to have killed 29 miners in a 2010 explosion and of lying to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Tips For Creating Effective Trial Graphics

    Aaron Stienstra

    These days, jurors and judges are so accustomed to seeing graphics — on the street, on the Web, on their smartphones — that they expect to see something good in the courtroom. The best graphics are composed of consequential information, clearly displayed, with emphasis on what matters most, paired with artwork that adds meaning. This simultaneously compels people to think, feel and make decisions, says Aaron Stienstra, design direc... (continued)

  • Takeaways From United Technologies' $75M Settlement

    Jeffrey Gerrish

    United Technologies Corporation's global settlement with the U.S. Departments of State and Justice underscores the importance of a robust compliance program to prevent, detect and remediate any violations of export control laws or regulations — especially if products and services are destined for China, say Jeffrey Gerrish and Soo-Mi Rhee of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Understanding Mayo V. Prometheus

    William Merkel

    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's treatment of the machine-or-transformation test in Mayo Collaborative Services Inc. v. Prometheus Laboratories Inc., the test — previously thought to be the governing test for patent eligibility under § 101 — no longer appears to occupy such a prominent role in patent-eligibility jurisprudence, says William Merkel of Marshall Gerstein & Borun LLP.

  • Radlax — 'An Easy Case'

    Douglas Spelfogel

    “This is an easy case,” Justice Antonin Scalia wrote in his opinion in Radlax Gateway Hotel LLC v. Amalgamated Bank, settling the issue of whether the Bankruptcy Code grants the secured creditor a right to credit bid in an auction sale under a plan. But interestingly, the opinion barely mentions the infamous Philadelphia News decision from the Third Circuit which was effectively overruled by the U.S. Supreme Court, say attorneys wi... (continued)

  • The Latest Attempt At Criminalizing 'Robo-Signing'

    Ralph Mazzeo

    While the New York state Senate did not act on the Foreclosure Fraud Prevention Act of 2012 before adjourning its regular session — and as a result there is little chance the bill will be enacted this year — the bill represents the latest attempt by state governments to impose criminal liability on fraudulent foreclosure practices by mortgage servicers or their employees, say attorneys with Dechert LLP.

  • How The 2nd Circ. Aleynikov Opinion Went Awry

    Mark Krotoski

    In United States v. Aleynikov, the Second Circuit recently created an unfortunate cloud over the scope of the federal trade secret statute. The decision detracts from the primary legislative objectives to promote and protect national economic security and punish individuals who misappropriate intellectual property in the form of trade secrets, say Mark Krotoski and Richard Scott of the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • PPACA Victory Sets Stage For New Wave Of Litigation

    Howard Shapiro

    Although the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and its coverage mandates have been upheld, the lack of regulatory guidance for many key areas of the statute creates uncertainty regarding implementation and enforcement. No matter how employers and plan fiduciaries approach the various coverage mandates, it is clear that the future is not without risk of litigation, say attorneys with Proskauer Rose LLP.

  • Did The Court Get The Oracle Analysis Right?

    David Makman

    The Northern District of California's opinion in Oracle America Inc. v. Google Inc. is suprising given that there was direct copying and that the threshold of originality required for a work to qualify as copyrightable has traditionally been so low that the application programming interfaces almost certainly qualified as sufficiently original to be protected by copyright, says David Makman of the Law Offices of David A. Makman.

  • Facing CFIUS: Better Safe Than Sorry

    George Wang

    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States recently blocked yet another acquisition involving Chinese investors. Any foreign companies looking to invest in the U.S. should be wary of the scrutiny they may confront, and determine whether CFIUS review is likely, say George Wang and Yelena Kotlarsky of Haynes and Boone LLP.

  • A Closer Look At ING's $619M Settlement

    Ed Krauland

    ING Bank NV's $619 million fine to settle criminal charges is the largest ever against a financial institution in connection with an investigation into U.S. sanctions violations and related offenses. The enforcement action is also notable in several other respects, say attorneys with Steptoe & Johnson LLP.