Aerospace & Defense

  • December 8, 2017

    Ex-Air Force Worker Admits Giving Bidders Contract Info

    A former U.S. Air Force employee pled guilty Thursday in Illinois federal court to allegations he accepted meals and baseball tickets and passed on confidential project pricing information to companies bidding on contracts at his base, information the U.S. Department of Justice said was used to secure work.

  • December 8, 2017

    Turkish Banker Knew Of US Concern Over Iran Ties, Jury Told

    A former Obama administration official responsible for financial security told a Manhattan jury Friday that Mehmet Hakan Atilla, a Turkish banker facing charges of helping Iran evade U.S. sanctions, attended many meetings where growing concerns in Washington over his bank's work with Tehran were aired.

  • December 8, 2017

    Amputee Vet Tells 4th Circ. W.Va. Tolling Law Saves Suit

    A veteran who had his lower leg amputated due to fractures and an infection following dialysis treatment at a VA hospital has told the Fourth Circuit that a lower court was wrong to toss his suit, arguing that a West Virginia tolling statute should have delayed the statute of limitations.

  • December 7, 2017

    Contractor Sues For $21M Over Bio Warfare Facility Work

    An electrical contractor sued a slew of construction and insurance companies in Maryland federal court Wednesday, demanding $21 million for the contractor's extra work on a biological warfare research facility and alleging the project was mismanaged and inefficient even before a fire destroyed half the building.

  • December 7, 2017

    Air Force Contractor, Subcontractor Settle $9M Suit

    U.S. Air Force contractor Space Coast Launch Services LLC reached an undisclosed settlement in Florida federal court Thursday with space launch operations support subcontractor Yang Enterprises Inc. in the subcontractor's breach of contract suit accusing Space Coast of underpaying it $9 million, according to settlement conference minutes.

  • December 7, 2017

    House Passes Temporary Government Funding Bill

    Congress on Thursday passed a measure to fund the government through Dec. 22, potentially avoiding a federal government shutdown over the weekend.

  • December 7, 2017

    VA Hospital Failed To Diagnose Heart Condition, Suit Says

    The spouse of a U.S. Marine Corps. veteran who died in the care of a Veterans Affairs medical facility hit the government with a lawsuit Wednesday in Illinois federal court, alleging physicians at the facility failed to adequately test and treat his deteriorating cardiovascular condition.

  • December 7, 2017

    Zarrab Denies Iranian 'Jihad' Motive At Turkish Banker's Trial

    Turkish-Iranian trader Reza Zarrab on Thursday denied being sympathetic to Iran’s “economic jihad” despite his letter to then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad complaining of U.S. “world-devouring Imperialism,” as counsel for a Turkish banker on trial for allegedly helping Iran duck sanctions peppered him with tough questions.

  • December 7, 2017

    Trump Asks For Stay On Allowing Transgender Troops

    The Trump administration on Wednesday urged a D.C. federal court to let it hold off on allowing transgender individuals to enlist in the military while it appeals that directive, arguing it won’t have time to implement the new policy by Jan. 1 and that the court’s decision contained errors. 

  • December 7, 2017

    FTC Wants More Info From Northrop Over $9.2B Orbital Deal

    Northrop Grumman Corp. on Wednesday said the Federal Trade Commission hit it with a second request for information related to its all-cash bid to buy defense technology services company Orbital ATK Inc. for $7.8 billion in cash and $1.4 billion in debt.

  • December 6, 2017

    Revived Travel Ban Puts Employers, Immigrants In A Bind

    With the U.S. Supreme Court allowing President Donald Trump's third travel ban to fully take effect, attorneys say affected individuals and businesses should brace for fallout, such as being unable to reunite with loved ones, attend business meetings, or sponsor immigrants for green cards in some cases.

  • December 6, 2017

    House Panel Takes First Step To Avoid Shutdown

    The House of Representatives took a step Wednesday toward avoiding a government shutdown this weekend, even as congressional leaders and the White House have yet to nail down a final deal for a temporary spending package.

  • December 6, 2017

    Army Unveils Program To Directly Hire Cyber Officers

    The U.S. Army will directly commission 25 cybersecurity experts over the next five years in order to improve its expertise in a growing area of need for national security, the Army’s top cyber officer announced Tuesday.

  • December 6, 2017

    Thompson Hine Bolsters Cybersecurity Team With DHS Hire

    Thompson Hine LLP has expanded its privacy and cybersecurity and business litigation practices with the recent addition of a senior counsel who spent the past 10 years working with federal government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the White House National Security Council.

  • December 6, 2017

    Another Navy Officer Faces 'Fat Leonard' Bribery Charges

    A U.S. Navy captain, the latest naval officer to face charges over a contract bribery scandal that has ensnared dozens of current and former officers, was arraigned Tuesday before a military court.

  • December 6, 2017

    EU Bank Tells 2nd Circ. Bomb Victims Can't Get Iran Bonds

    A Luxembourg bank Tuesday asked the Second Circuit for an en banc rehearing of a panel decision allowing families and victims of the 1983 Beirut Marine Corps barracks bombing to pursue $1.68 billion in damages, in the form of bonds held by the bank for Iran’s central bank.

  • December 6, 2017

    Zarrab Concedes He Lied About Iran Sanctions Scheme

    Turkish-Iranian businessman Reza Zarrab told a Manhattan jury Wednesday that he was surprised to learn in March that Turkish banker Mehmet Hakan Atilla had been arrested for allegedly scheming to violate U.S. sanctions against Iran and said also that he lied to Atilla about the scheme prior to his own arrest last year.

  • December 6, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Questions $133M ‘Taking’ Of Dallas Air Terminal

    A Federal Circuit panel on Wednesday had tough questions for both the government and particularly the leaseholders of a demolished Dallas airport terminal that won a $133.5 million judgment over the terminal’s closure, with at least one judge wondering how a “taking” could have occurred.

  • December 6, 2017

    Co. Fights To Save Patent On Urine Bags Used By Pilots

    American Innotek Inc. fought to overturn a ruling that its patent covering waste disposal bags used by U.S. Air Force pilots was obvious during an appeal before a Federal Circuit panel Wednesday.

  • December 5, 2017

    FBI Nat'l Security Letters Grounded In Constitution: DOJ

    U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions urged the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday not to rehear a decision ending a constitutional challenge to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's use of national security letters that bar service providers from telling users about government requests for their data, saying it’s grounded in the U.S. Constitution.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Can You Practice In Your State?

    Eve Runyon

    The justice gap is a well-documented problem and over the past two decades, law firms have mobilized attorneys to provide millions of hours of pro bono every year. But for many in-house counsel, there remains a big hurdle — restrictive multijurisdictional practice rules, says Eve Runyon, president and CEO of Pro Bono Institute.

  • Opinion

    Representing Women At The Intersection Of Law And Finance

    Andrea Mitchell

    To the extent that companies have tolerated predominantly male leadership in the past because it was deemed necessary for growth and prosperity, or viewed diversity and the underrepresentation of women strictly as human resources issues, a growing body of research suggests otherwise, say Andrea Mitchell and Valerie Hletko of Buckley Sandler LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Building Sponsorship Relationships

    Michael Scudder

    Within their first year, associates should make it a priority to take on a pro bono matter and approach a partner about supervising the project. By collaborating with a partner on a pro bono case, young associates can cultivate sponsorship relationships while simultaneously contributing to the public good, say Michael Scudder and Jay Mitchell of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • House Bill Would Raise Stakes Of Congressional Inquiries

    Steven Ross

    On Monday, the House passed a bill that, if enacted, would shift the current landscape regarding judicial review of congressional subpoenas and place significant burdens on all recipients of such subpoenas, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • Series

    What I Learned In My 1st Year: Be A Sponge

    Patrick Mendes

    As a new attorney, it was astonishing to realize how little I knew. I soon began to appreciate that everyone I met had a unique take or way of doing something. Many things I learned during that first year from my colleagues are still incorporated into my practice today, says Patrick Mendes of Tyson & Mendes LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Beyond The Hurdles

    Ann Warren

    There are various barriers to corporate pro bono work, including lack of malpractice insurance coverage, limited resources, and the transactional nature of the majority of in-house legal work. But at the end of the day, we’ve overcome many of these barriers, says Ann Warren, associate general counsel of Duke Energy Corp.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Pryor Reviews 'Scalia Speaks'

    Judge William Pryor

    Christopher Scalia and Edward Whelan have published an indispensable collection of the late Justice Antonin Scalia's best speeches. "Scalia Speaks: Reflections on Law, Faith, and Life Well Lived" puts on full display Justice Scalia’s skilled writing, quick wit and uncommon wisdom on a wide range of topics — from law to turkey hunting, says Judge William Pryor of the Eleventh Circuit.

  • How The 3rd Circ. Stripped Down The 'Bare Metal' Defense

    Cory Lapin

    After the Third Circuit's recent decision in the Asbestos Products Liability Litigation case, manufacturers within the court's jurisdiction should not expect claims against them to be dismissed under a “bare metal" defense, unless they can show that they could not have known that asbestos would later be added to their products, says Cory Lapin of Manion Gaynor & Manning LLP.

  • Financial Crisis Anniversary

    The Inside Counsel Revolution

    Ben Heineman

    The role of the general counsel has significantly grown in importance, with the GC now often replacing the senior partner in the outside law firm as the primary counselor for the CEO and the board. This inside counsel revolution was given great impetus by the financial crisis that started 10 years ago, says Ben Heineman Jr., former general counsel of General Electric Co.

  • How Arbitrators Maintain Proportionality In Discovery

    Richard Seymour

    There has been much discussion of discovery proportionality in federal litigation since the December 2015 changes to Civil Rule 26. But arbitrators have long used procedures to simplify the discovery process that courts have only recently begun to adopt, says attorney and arbitrator Richard Seymour.