Aerospace & Defense

  • December 11, 2017

    Turkish Ex-Cop's Testimony Sparks Mistrial Bid By Banker

    A former Istanbul police investigator told a Manhattan jury Monday that Mehmet Hakan Atilla, a Turkish banker facing charges of helping Iran evade U.S. sanctions, was being monitored about five years ago, but Atilla’s lawyers called his testimony irrelevant and asked for a mistrial.

  • December 11, 2017

    Chopper Repair Co. Fights To Keep Safran Contract Suit Alive

    A Kansas company that buys and repairs helicopters and engines urged a Texas federal court Friday to deny a bid to dismiss its suit against French aerospace company Safran SA and several of its affiliates, arguing it has raised plausible claims of breach of contract and antitrust law violations.

  • December 11, 2017

    DOD To Accept Trans Troops After Court Refuses To Budge

    The U.S. Department of Defense will allow transgender people to enlist in the military beginning Jan. 1, after a Washington, D.C., federal judge on Monday refused to halt an injunction against the Trump administration’s efforts to stop transgender troops from serving.

  • December 8, 2017

    The Law Firms Of The 2017 MVPs

    Law360's MVP award goes to attorneys who have distinguished themselves from their peers in litigation, deals and other complex matters. Find the MVPs at your firm here.

  • December 8, 2017

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 78 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360’s 2017 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • December 8, 2017

    Judge Who Accepted Flynn’s Guilty Plea Recuses Himself

    The judge who accepted former national security adviser Michael Flynn’s guilty plea to a count of lying to the FBI about contacts with Russia’s ambassador before the inauguration of President Donald Trump has recused himself from the case.

  • December 8, 2017

    Ex-Air Force Worker Admits Giving Bidders Contract Info

    A former U.S. Air Force employee pled guilty Thursday in Illinois federal court to allegations he accepted meals and baseball tickets and passed on confidential project pricing information to companies bidding on contracts at his base, information the U.S. Department of Justice said was used to secure work.

  • December 8, 2017

    Turkish Banker Knew Of US Concern Over Iran Ties, Jury Told

    A former Obama administration official responsible for financial security told a Manhattan jury Friday that Mehmet Hakan Atilla, a Turkish banker facing charges of helping Iran evade U.S. sanctions, attended many meetings where growing concerns in Washington over his bank's work with Tehran were aired.

  • December 8, 2017

    Amputee Vet Tells 4th Circ. W.Va. Tolling Law Saves Suit

    A veteran who had his lower leg amputated due to fractures and an infection following dialysis treatment at a VA hospital has told the Fourth Circuit that a lower court was wrong to toss his suit, arguing that a West Virginia tolling statute should have delayed the statute of limitations.

  • December 7, 2017

    Contractor Sues For $21M Over Bio Warfare Facility Work

    An electrical contractor sued a slew of construction and insurance companies in Maryland federal court Wednesday, demanding $21 million for the contractor's extra work on a biological warfare research facility and alleging the project was mismanaged and inefficient even before a fire destroyed half the building.

  • December 7, 2017

    Air Force Contractor, Subcontractor Settle $9M Suit

    U.S. Air Force contractor Space Coast Launch Services LLC reached an undisclosed settlement in Florida federal court Thursday with space launch operations support subcontractor Yang Enterprises Inc. in the subcontractor's breach of contract suit accusing Space Coast of underpaying it $9 million, according to settlement conference minutes.

  • December 7, 2017

    House Passes Temporary Government Funding Bill

    Congress on Thursday passed a measure to fund the government through Dec. 22, potentially avoiding a federal government shutdown over the weekend.

  • December 7, 2017

    VA Hospital Failed To Diagnose Heart Condition, Suit Says

    The spouse of a U.S. Marine Corps. veteran who died in the care of a Veterans Affairs medical facility hit the government with a lawsuit Wednesday in Illinois federal court, alleging physicians at the facility failed to adequately test and treat his deteriorating cardiovascular condition.

  • December 7, 2017

    Zarrab Denies Iranian 'Jihad' Motive At Turkish Banker's Trial

    Turkish-Iranian trader Reza Zarrab on Thursday denied being sympathetic to Iran’s “economic jihad” despite his letter to then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad complaining of U.S. “world-devouring Imperialism,” as counsel for a Turkish banker on trial for allegedly helping Iran duck sanctions peppered him with tough questions.

  • December 7, 2017

    Trump Asks For Stay On Allowing Transgender Troops

    The Trump administration on Wednesday urged a D.C. federal court to let it hold off on allowing transgender individuals to enlist in the military while it appeals that directive, arguing it won’t have time to implement the new policy by Jan. 1 and that the court’s decision contained errors. 

  • December 7, 2017

    FTC Wants More Info From Northrop Over $9.2B Orbital Deal

    Northrop Grumman Corp. on Wednesday said the Federal Trade Commission hit it with a second request for information related to its all-cash bid to buy defense technology services company Orbital ATK Inc. for $7.8 billion in cash and $1.4 billion in debt.

  • December 6, 2017

    Revived Travel Ban Puts Employers, Immigrants In A Bind

    With the U.S. Supreme Court allowing President Donald Trump's third travel ban to fully take effect, attorneys say affected individuals and businesses should brace for fallout, such as being unable to reunite with loved ones, attend business meetings, or sponsor immigrants for green cards in some cases.

  • December 6, 2017

    House Panel Takes First Step To Avoid Shutdown

    The House of Representatives took a step Wednesday toward avoiding a government shutdown this weekend, even as congressional leaders and the White House have yet to nail down a final deal for a temporary spending package.

  • December 6, 2017

    Army Unveils Program To Directly Hire Cyber Officers

    The U.S. Army will directly commission 25 cybersecurity experts over the next five years in order to improve its expertise in a growing area of need for national security, the Army’s top cyber officer announced Tuesday.

  • December 6, 2017

    Thompson Hine Bolsters Cybersecurity Team With DHS Hire

    Thompson Hine LLP has expanded its privacy and cybersecurity and business litigation practices with the recent addition of a senior counsel who spent the past 10 years working with federal government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the White House National Security Council.

Expert Analysis

  • New Defense IP Provisions Will Impact Contractor Data Rights

    Mary Beth Bosco

    Contractors need to prepare for the 2018 version of the National Defense Authorization Act, which includes significant changes to the U.S. Department of Defense approach to acquiring and licensing intellectual property, says Mary Beth Bosco of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Siemens Lesson — Tillerson Is Right

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    Since its whopping $800 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlement in 2008, Siemens cleaned up — and it has “cleaned up” in its long-standing competition with General Electric. How? As Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reportedly told President Donald Trump, you don’t need to pay bribes to succeed in international business, says Peter Y. Solmssen, former general counsel of Siemens.

  • Basic Human Rights: Whose Job Is Enforcement?

    Dan Weissman

    The cases of Jesner v. Arab Bank and Doe v. Cisco Systems pose different legal tests under the Alien Tort Statute. But these decisions could hold major consequences for environmentalists, human rights activists and even individuals who have turned to ATS to go after transnational corporations, says Dan Weissman of LexisNexis.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Rise In International Enforcement

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    The 2008 Siemens matter — then the largest sanction ever imposed in a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action — set the stage for future cross-collaboration in global anti-corruption enforcement, say Cheryl Scarboro, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and Diana Wielocha of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP.

  • Yates Memo: Missing The Forest For The Trees — Part 2

    Daniel Schoeni

    Recognizing that misconduct in government contracts cases is sometimes collective, rather than individual, could help officials to more accurately identify the locus of responsibility and issue debarments accordingly. This could also discourage the debarment system’s overreliance on criminal convictions, says Daniel Schoeni, a judge advocate with the U.S. Air Force.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: Highlights From The 1st Corporate Trial

    Robert Feldman

    The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case of U.S. v. Harris Corp. was tried in March 1991 — so long ago that pretty much only the parties and counsel remember it. With a smile, I’ve just about given up correcting people who say their case is "the only FCPA case ever to be tried,” says Robert Feldman of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP.

  • Yates Memo: Missing The Forest For The Trees — Part 1

    Daniel Schoeni

    Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein recently announced that the U.S. Department of Justice supports the Yates memo’s emphasis on prosecuting individuals for corporate misconduct. But this focus overlooks the problem of "nondistributive" corporate actions, says Daniel Schoeni, a judge advocate with the U.S. Air Force.

  • How Lying To The US Government Can Land You In Jail

    Wilfredo Ferrer

    Michael Flynn, George Papadopoulos and many others have not been charged with the crimes for which they were being investigated. The reasons why prosecutors make charging decisions are complex and case-specific. Regardless, the extraordinary scope of Section 1001 can easily ensnare the unwary, say Wifredo Ferrer and Michael Hantman of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Congressional Forecast: December

    Richard Hertling

    Members of Congress face a daunting to-do list in the final weeks of 2017. While some believe a looming deadline will help get things done, there is worry on Capitol Hill that the legislative pileup and long-simmering partisan battles on major budget and policy issues have created a prime opportunity for political brinkmanship to paralyze the high-stakes negotiations, say Richard Hertling and Kaitlyn McClure of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Strange Case That Started It All

    Burton Wiand

    At the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in April 1978, we filed a case against Page Airways and envisioned the trial of a precedent-setting enforcement action that would have defined Foreign Corrupt Practices Act standards at an early stage. Instead, the matter was settled under circumstances that I am sure are unique in SEC history, says Burton Wiand of Wiand Guerra King PA.