We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Aerospace & Defense

  • November 16, 2018

    Dem Rep. Calls Out DOD After Failed Financial Audit

    U.S. Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Calif., on Friday criticized the U.S. Department of Defense after the agency failed its first department-wide financial audit, saying the report highlighted the agency’s history of wasteful spending.

  • November 16, 2018

    Feds' Late Evidence Causes Mistrial In $16M Fraud Suit

    The fraud trial of a former U.S. Department of Defense official and a government contractor accused of partaking in a $15.7 million kickback scheme will have to start over, a Virginia federal judge has ruled, finding the men might've switched up their trial tactics if they had had time to review thousands of documents prosecutors revealed midtrial.

  • November 15, 2018

    US Must Use 'Full Toolkit' To Fight Cybercrime: Ex-DOJ Chief

    John P. Carlin, who ran the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division before going into private practice, tells Law360 how a deterrence campaign can help America win its "code war" against Russia, China, North Korea and Iran. He also shares advice for firms deciding whether to tell authorities about cyberattacks.

  • November 15, 2018

    Russian Co. Can't Duck Election Interference Indictment

    A D.C. federal judge ruled Thursday that a Russian company cannot escape an indictment from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel accusing it of conspiring to influence the outcome of the 2016 elections, saying there is sufficient evidence to support the charge of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

  • November 15, 2018

    Subcontractor Stiffed $4M For Army Airfield Work, Suit Says

    A Florida-based contractor failed to pay one of its subcontractors for at least $4 million worth of work, materials and equipment provided as part of an infrastructure project at Wheeler Army Airfield in Hawaii, the subcontractor alleged in a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday.

  • November 15, 2018

    DOD Fails First-Ever Financial Audit, Official Says

    The U.S. Department of Defense has “failed” its first departmentwide financial audit, the DOD’s second-highest official revealed Thursday at the Pentagon.

  • November 15, 2018

    Funds Managing $4.83T In Assets Sign Gun Safety Principles

    The California Public Employees’ Retirement System, State Street Global Advisors and other institutional investors managing a total of $4.83 trillion in assets have signed off on a set of principles aimed at creating a “framework to advance a responsible civilian firearms industry” in the U.S.

  • November 15, 2018

    DOJ Sharpens Gov't Fraud Focus, Adds Merger Review Clarity

    The U.S. Department of Justice will sharpen its focus on bringing competition cases in which the government itself has been defrauded by bid-rigging and similar conduct, DOJ Antitrust Division head Makan Delrahim said in a speech Thursday, adding that the agency would seek triple damages when defendants refuse to settle.

  • November 15, 2018

    Family Of Crash Victim Sues Boeing Over Plane Defect

    The family of an Indonesian doctor killed in the Lion Air Flight 610 crash in October has sued The Boeing Co. in Illinois state court, alleging the company failed to warn pilots of a defect in the control system that can cause a new model of planes to go into a dive.

  • November 15, 2018

    Perkins Coie Adds Gov’t Contracts Atty From Cooley

    Perkins Coie LLP has snagged a veteran government contracts litigator from Cooley LLP who has aided a contractor battling to preserve a $49 million military staff support contract amid a flurry of bid protests, as a partner for its Washington, D.C., office.

  • November 15, 2018

    FCC Tees Up New GPS Signals And Space Debris Rules

    The Federal Communications Commission took steps Thursday to update a lineup of satellite-related regulations, including an inquiry into the proliferation of orbital debris and a vote to allow American devices to begin receiving signals from the European global positioning system Galileo, with the lone Democratic commissioner saying the move brings up security concerns.

  • November 15, 2018

    Unions Hit VA With Challenge To 'Official Time' Decision

    Three unions have mounted a challenge in D.C. federal court to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs decision that would stop its workers in the medical realm from spending work time on certain union business, the latest row in a larger fight over so-called official time.

  • November 15, 2018

    DOD Reaches $23B Deal With Lockheed For More F-35s

    The U.S. Department of Defense and Lockheed Martin Corp. have reached a preliminary deal for 255 F-35 fighter jets for the U.S. and foreign partners worth up to $22.7 billion, the largest order yet for the aircraft, the DOD has announced.

  • November 14, 2018

    S. Korean Cos. On Hook For $236M In Bid-Rigging Conspiracy

    Three South Korea-based oil refiners and logistics companies pled guilty Wednesday to rigging bids on U.S. Department of Defense fuel supply contracts, violating the Sherman Antitrust Act, and agreed to pay $236 million in criminal fines and civil damages, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • November 14, 2018

    Oracle Protest Over $10B JEDI Cloud Deal Denied

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office on Wednesday denied an Oracle unit's protest over the U.S. Department of Defense's pending $10 billion Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure cloud computing contract, saying the DOD acted reasonably when it chose to use a single vendor for the deal.

  • November 14, 2018

    Senate Passes Coast Guard Bill With Ballast Compromise

    A bill reauthorizing the U.S. Coast Guard heads back to the House of Representatives on Wednesday after the Senate voted to pass a version of the legislation that includes a compromise over how the federal government will regulate ship ballast and discharge.

  • November 14, 2018

    Retired Navy Capt. Cops To Role In 'Fat Leonard' Bribery Case

    A retired U.S. Navy captain pled guilty Tuesday to his role in the sweeping “Fat Leonard” bribery scheme related to Navy port services contracts, as a former master chief petty officer was also sentenced to 17 months in prison for his involvement.

  • November 14, 2018

    Calif. Man Gets 9 Years For Russian Export Scheme

    A California man has been sentenced in federal court to nine years in prison for money laundering and for conspiring to violate export laws, the U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday.

  • November 13, 2018

    GAO Urges Defense Dept. To Clarify Lowest Price Deal Criteria

    The U.S. Department of Defense needs to clarify its requirements around using the lowest price, technically acceptable contracting model, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said Tuesday, claiming the DOD wasn’t yet consistently following lawmakers’ mandates for LPTA deals.

  • November 13, 2018

    Texas Contractor CEO Didn't Rip Off NASA, Jury Says

    A Texas federal jury has delivered an acquittal in a criminal fraud case accusing the CEO of a NASA contractor of falsely representing hours worked and costs, according to the executive’s lawyer.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Celebrate Veterans By Improving Their Access To Justice

    Linda Klein

    Attorneys should think beyond the Veterans Day parades and use their time and talents to help the many veterans facing urgent legal issues, says Linda Klein of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.

  • Iran Sanctions Reimposed: 5 Key Questions

    Mario Mancuso

    With this week's reimposition of the final tranche of U.S. sanctions against Iran, foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies must ensure they have concluded all Iran-related business. The addition of more Iranian individuals and entities to the specially designated nationals list means additional compliance risks, say attorneys with Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

  • Opinion

    Time To Reclaim Wellness For All Lawyers

    Leesa Klepper

    The decision last month by Baker McKenzie’s global chairman to step down due to exhaustion indicates that the legal profession needs to mount a broader wellness effort to address long hours, high stress, frequent travel and the daily demands of practice, says Leesa Klepper, director of Thrivewell Coaching.

  • The Challenge Iran Sanctions Pose For EU Operators

    Michael Casey

    On Nov. 5, the United States will reimpose economic sanctions that target Iran but will also impact many European companies. The interaction between U.S. and EU sanctions regimes will create novel legal issues and compliance challenges for European companies with ties to the U.S., say attorneys at Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

  • Hospitality Rules And Risks: Considerations For Defense Cos.

    Howard Weissman

    ​New ​guidelines ​from the ​International Forum on Business Ethical Conduct ​establish general principles for ​aerospace and defense companies on acceptable practices related to providing business courtesies and hospitalities.​ In our experience, companies fall into three broad groups on this issue, say Howard Weissman and Lina Braude of Baker McKenzie.

  • Protecting Law Firm Talent At Both Ends

    Susan Blakely

    By 2030, it is possible that 75 percent of lawyers practicing in the U.S. will be millennials. A broadened focus on retention and advancement of all young lawyers is therefore a logical step forward but it fails to address another major retention issue that law firms should explore, says Susan Smith Blakely of LegalPerspectives LLC.

  • Suspension And Debarment: FY 2018 By The Numbers

    David Robbins

    Data in the System for Award Management shows a decline in federal suspension and debarment activity. The government excluded fewer contractors in every category in fiscal year 2018 compared to FY 2017, and even fewer when compared to FY 2016, say David Robbins and Laura Baker of Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • Q&A

    Wendy Olson Talks Twin Falls, Tribes, Private Practice

    Wendy Olson

    Former U.S. Attorney for the District of Idaho Wendy Olson discusses her decades of experience prosecuting white collar crimes and civil rights violations, her work and challenges as U.S. attorney, and her move to private practice.

  • Prospects For Tax Policy In A Divided Post-Election Congress

    Evan Migdail

    The outcome of next week's election remains uncertain, but it is possible to predict some of the policy changes and legislative initiatives likely to arise during lame duck and 116th congressional sessions if Democrats regain a majority in the House of Representatives, say Evan Migdail and Melissa Gierach at DLA Piper LLP.

  • CFIUS' Pilot Program: Takeaways For State-Owned Investors

    Nancy Fischer

    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. has announced a pilot program requiring filings when entities linked to foreign governments acquire substantial interests in certain U.S. businesses. State-owned entities will need to report more transactions, but the process will be streamlined in many cases, say Nancy Fischer and Matthew Rabinowitz of Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.