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California

  • September 21, 2018

    Sempra Charts Green Energy Exit With $1.5B Con Ed Deal

    Sempra Energy agreed Thursday to sell a U.S. renewable energy unit to Consolidated Edison Inc. for $1.54 billion, part of an asset divestment plan unveiled in June amid activist investor pressure that will see Sempra exit the U.S. renewable project business.

  • September 21, 2018

    Fenwick & West-Led Upwork Launches $135M IPO

    Upwork Inc., a venture-backed marketplace for businesses to hire and manage remote freelancers, launched an estimated $135 million initial public offering that was guided by Fenwick & West LLP, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday. 

  • September 20, 2018

    Challenge To No-Fly List Airborne Again, 9th Circ. Says

    The Ninth Circuit ruled Thursday that the government must face a suit brought by a naturalized U.S. citizen who alleges it put his name on the no-fly list to try to induce him to become an informant, reversing an Oregon federal court’s decision.

  • September 20, 2018

    PayPal Investors Face Skeptical Judge In Hack Class Action

    A California federal judge seemed skeptical Thursday about whether a proposed class of PayPal shareholders’ data breach suit could move forward, saying his “biggest issue” was the suit’s reliance on confidential witnesses, whose allegations were “pretty amorphous,” especially when it came to showing the company knowingly hid the breach in an early press release.

  • September 20, 2018

    Blink-182 Drummer Sues Over Crash, Injury That Halted Gigs

    Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker filed a lawsuit Tuesday over two incidents this summer — a medical procedure and a car crash — that he says forced the band to cancel two reunion projects, a Las Vegas residency and an upcoming tour.

  • September 20, 2018

    Immigrants, Feds Face Off Over Mental Health Care Injunction

    A proposed class of immigrant parents who have been detained and separated from their children under Trump administration policy faced off with the federal government in California federal court on Thursday, debating whether an injunction can be imposed to ensure mental health care is provided to the families.

  • September 20, 2018

    Uber Presses 9th Circ. To Undo Driver Misclassification Suits

    Uber told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday that its recent finding that federal law doesn’t preempt California’s decades-old standard for determining whether workers are employees or independent contractors should dismantle a class of hundreds of thousands of Uber drivers alleging they were misclassified and denied expense reimbursements and tips.

  • September 20, 2018

    9th Circ. Saves Gym TCPA Suit After DC Circ. Ruling

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday revived a proposed class action accusing gym chain Crunch San Diego LLC of spamming members' cellphones with promotional text messages, finding that a recent D.C. Circuit decision led to an expanded definition of an autodialer under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • September 20, 2018

    OSU Exec Defends Amateurism Amid Coach Salary Scrutiny

    Ohio State University athletic director Eugene Smith defended NCAA rules limiting student compensation during a landmark antitrust trial Thursday in California federal court, testifying that paying athletes would force the department to cut certain sports, while conceding that the school's coaches collectively earn more than $30 million in salaries and benefits annually.

  • September 20, 2018

    J&M Vendors' Skittishness Threatens Ch. 11 Plan Hopes

    The prospects of discount retailer J&M Sales Inc. getting to a confirmed Chapter 11 plan of reorganization dimmed Thursday, when attorneys for the chain of stores told a Delaware bankruptcy judge that its vendors were wary of signing on to a process where they would provide inventory on shortened terms.

  • September 20, 2018

    9th Circ. Delivers Concrete Drivers A Win In Wage Row

    The Ninth Circuit said Thursday that California's decision to include ready-mix concrete drivers under the state's prevailing wage law doesn't violate the equal protection clause because there are sound reasons for concluding the drivers are different from other truckers, as they have more responsibility and are vulnerable to underbidding.

  • September 20, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Nature Nate’s, Rocket Internet, Amazon

    Private equity firms are buzzing around Nature Nate’s Honey Co., Rocket Internet is reportedly getting ready to list Jumia, and Amazon and an India-based private equity firm have bought Indian retail and grocery chain More.

  • September 20, 2018

    J&J Can't Escape Calif. Talc Warning Label Suit

    A California federal judge has rebuffed Johnson & Johnson's bid to dismiss a suit alleging it violates state warning label and false advertising laws by selling asbestos-contaminated talcum powder products, writing the consumer products giant was "simply demanding more" detail than is necessary in a complaint.

  • September 20, 2018

    Bid To Nix Trans Worker Firing Suit A Head-Scratcher: Judge

    A California federal judge said Thursday he was “left scratching [his] head” by an educational technology company’s bid to end the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s suit over the firing of a transgender worker, saying the employee's damning post on a recruitment website created a factual basis for a retaliation argument.

  • September 20, 2018

    Calif. Tribe Launches Environmental Review For New Casino

    The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Tule River Indian Tribe are moving forward with plans to begin a preliminary environmental review process for a proposed 40-acre casino and tribe housing project in California, according to a notice filed Thursday.

  • September 20, 2018

    HP Inks $1.5M Deal In Cartridge Monopoly Suit

    Hewlett Packard Co. will pay a class of printer customers $1.5 million, not including attorneys' fees, to resolve allegations over phony error messages that popped up when users tried to install third-party ink cartridges, under a settlement proposed Tuesday in California federal court.

  • September 20, 2018

    Goodwin-Led Eventbrite's Shares Soar After $230M IPO

    Shares of online ticketing platform Eventbrite Inc., represented by Goodwin Procter LLP, sizzled in their debut Thursday after the venture-backed company priced a $230 million initial public offering at the top of its range, marking the latest technology issuer to score with investors.

  • September 20, 2018

    9th Circ. To Rehear Case Over Counsel For Immigrant Minors

    The full Ninth Circuit will reconsider a panel ruling that immigrant children are not entitled to government-provided counsel in removal proceedings, according to orders issued Wednesday.

  • September 20, 2018

    CBS Wants 9th Circ. To Rethink Pre-1972 Song Ruling

    CBS is asking the full Ninth Circuit to rethink a ruling last month that “remastered” versions of old recordings aren’t entitled to new copyrights, arguing the decision “overturned decades of law” on so-called derivative works.

  • September 20, 2018

    DOT Says Hazmat Regs Override Calif. Trucker Break Rules

    The U.S. Department of Transportation determined Thursday that federal law preempts California's meal and rest break requirements for all motor vehicle operators transporting hazardous materials, granting a request from a trucking group to harmonize what it viewed as inconsistent regulations.

Expert Analysis

  • Hurricane Florence: How State Laws Protect Service Members

    Jeffrey Naimon

    As the southeastern United States braces for Hurricane Florence, the governors of several states have authorized National Guard response efforts. Creditors can do their part by being aware of the laws protecting military service members, say attorneys with Buckley Sandler LLP.

  • In Calif., Questions Remain On Law Firm Conflict Waivers

    Richard Rosensweig

    In Sheppard Mullin v. J-M Manufacturing Co., the California Supreme Court ruled last month that a law firm's failure to disclose a known conflict with another current client did not categorically disentitle the firm from recovering fees. But the court didn’t provide hoped-for guidance on how to write an enforceable advance conflict waiver, says Richard Rosensweig of Goulston & Storrs PC.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Faegre Client Development Chief Melanie Green

    Melanie Green

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Melanie Green, chief client development officer at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • LED Bulb Case Shines Light On FTC Enforcement

    Terri Seligman

    Last month, the Federal Trade Commission announced it would be mailing almost half a million checks to consumers who previously purchased Lights of America LED lightbulbs. This enforcement action holds key lessons for companies and their counsel involved in formulating advertising claims, particularly technical claims about performance, says Terri Seligman of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • Guest Feature

    Tom Mesereau Talks MJ, Cosby, Unconventional Choices

    Randy Maniloff

    Tom Mesereau may be recently recognizable as one of the attorneys who defended Bill Cosby, but his biggest claim to fame is successfully defending Michael Jackson in 2005. On the eve of what would have been the King of Pop’s 60th birthday, Randy Maniloff, of White and Williams LLP, spoke to Mesereau about his unconventional path to a remarkable career.

  • Why State Marijuana-Impaired Driving Laws Need Reform

    Ian Stewart

    Because current state laws relating to marijuana-impaired driving lack an objective impairment standard, only those who clearly demonstrate impaired driving are likely to be prosecuted and convicted, says Ian Stewart of Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP.

  • To Stay Or Not To Stay: Considering The '5-Year Rule'

    Karin Bohmholdt

    In Martinez v. Landry Restaurants, a California state appeals court recently held that the time period during which a federal appeal from an order remanding a case to state court is pending should be included when calculating the “five-year rule” for bringing a case to trial. This shows that all counsel should consider whether to seek a stay of proceedings where the case crosses jurisdictional boundaries, says Karin Bohmholdt of Greenberg Traurig LLP.

  • Opinion

    Court Doubles Down On Incorrect Right Of Publicity Ruling

    Ronald Katz

    A California federal court's refusal last week to reconsider Davis v. Electronic Arts magnifies the manifest errors in its recent decision by ignoring the blatantly obvious identifiability of the former NFL players, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners LLP.

  • 9th Circ. FCA Ruling Undermines Escobar

    Robert Salcido

    At first glance, the Ninth Circuit's ruling in U.S. v. Stephens Institute seems like welcome news to False Claims Act defendants. But a closer look reveals that the panel’s defective application of Escobar’s implied false certification test and materiality standard overshadows this holding, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • 3 Risk Management Options For Autonomous Vehicle Makers

    Patrick Reilly

    While there are no precedential court decisions involving an autonomous vehicle accident yet, it's only a matter of time. In-house counsel should consider a range of legal, professional and technological measures to avoid or mitigate the litigation risks, say attorneys with Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.