Class Action

  • February 15, 2018

    6D Global Investors Say Derivative Suit Deal Is 'Worthless'

    Investors owning more than half of 6D Global Technologies Inc.’s stock have objected to a proposed settlement of derivative claims that the digital marketing company failed to stop a private equity firm’s CEO from manipulating its share price, telling a New York federal judge Wednesday that the corporate reforms spelled out in the deal are “utterly worthless.”

  • February 15, 2018

    Dubious Timeline Saves Nursing Home Chain From OT Suit

    A Washington federal judge on Thursday dismissed a proposed collective action by former co-managers at national nursing home chain Holiday Retirement alleging the company illegally denied them overtime, saying the workers can’t sue because they hid their claims during a 2015 bankruptcy.

  • February 15, 2018

    Calsonic Reaches $11M Price-Fix Deal In Car Parts MDL

    A proposed class of car buyers said Thursday they have reached an $11 million settlement of their claims in multidistrict litigation that Japanese auto parts maker Calsonic Kansei Corp. was part of a conspiracy to fix prices for vehicle air conditioning systems.

  • February 15, 2018

    EquiTrust Hit With Suit Over Unauthorized Payout Fees

    EquiTrust Life Insurance Co. was hit with a putative class action in Florida federal court Wednesday by two policyholders who claim the company charges fees that aren't authorized in policy provisions when customers surrender or redeem their life insurance policies.

  • February 15, 2018

    Uber Drivers Win Class Cert. In Fair-Share Pay Suit

    A California federal judge on Wednesday certified a nationwide class of Uber drivers alleging the company’s upfront pricing model denies them their fair share of riders’ payments, a week after he described the suit as a “classic case of a class action” based on a form contract.

  • February 15, 2018

    Northrop Grumman Gets Ex-Workers' ERISA Suit Trimmed

    A California federal judge on Thursday trimmed most of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act claims brought by ex-workers against Northrop Grumman Corp. over allegedly excessive pension fund fees, agreeing with Northrop that it didn't have a fiduciary duty as it wasn't named in the fund's governing agreements.

  • February 15, 2018

    Bioverativ Shareholders Sue To Block $11.6B Sale To Sanofi

    Shareholders of Bioverativ Inc. slapped the biopharmaceutical company and its board of directors with a proposed securities class action in Massachusetts federal court on Thursday, accusing them of withholding crucial information needed to make an informed decision on a proposed $11.6 billion sale to Sanofi.

  • February 15, 2018

    Mitsubishi Inks $33M Deal In Sprawling Cathode-Ray MDL

    Mitsubishi Electric Corp. on Wednesday settled with a class of indirect buyers of cathode ray tubes for $33 million in California federal court, bringing total settlements in multidistrict litigation over an alleged price-fixing conspiracy involving electronics companies to $820 million.

  • February 15, 2018

    House Passes Bill To Curb Lawsuits Over ADA Violations

    The House of Representatives passed a bill intended to curb allegedly abusive Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuits Thursday, even as critics argued it would undermine protections under the civil rights law.

  • February 15, 2018

    Fiat Says Shares Were Unaffected By ‘Defeat Device’ Claims

    Fiat Chrysler has urged a New York federal court not to certify a class of investors accusing executives of falsely stating Chrysler vehicles didn’t contain “defeat devices” in an effort to inflate share prices, saying the alleged misrepresentations had no impact on the stock.

  • February 15, 2018

    A Chat With Hogan Lovells HR Chief Allison Friend

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Allison Friend, chief human resources officer for Hogan Lovells.

  • February 14, 2018

    7th Circ. Wants Extra Briefing On Fees In TCPA Cruise Deal

    A Seventh Circuit panel on Wednesday sharply questioned the ripeness of an appeal claiming that an award of attorneys’ fees in a $56 million-plus settlement of a Telephone Consumer Protection Act class action was potentially $3 million too high, and demanded supplemental briefing.

  • February 14, 2018

    Gold Sellers Say CFTC Order Shows UBS Helped Fix Prices

    A group of gold sellers told a New York federal judge Tuesday that a recent Commodity Futures Trading Commission sanctions order against UBS AG shows the Swiss bank should not be allowed to escape a suit accusing a group of international banks of manipulating the benchmark price of gold.

  • February 14, 2018

    Cascadian Investor Says $614M Deal Statement Omitted Info

    A shareholder of biopharmaceutical company Cascadian Therapeutics Inc. launched a class action on Tuesday in Delaware federal court alleging the company’s directors omitted material information from documents detailing a proposed $614 million merger deal with Seattle Genetics Inc.

  • February 14, 2018

    AT&T Beats Consumers' Class Cert. Bid In Robocall Case

    A group of consumers suing telecom giant AT&T for robocalls the company allegedly made was denied class certification Wednesday after AT&T told the court late last year that it denies the bulk of the allegations made in the lawsuit.

  • February 14, 2018

    H-2A Visa Shepherds Still Can't Get Class Cert. For Wage Suit

    A Nevada federal judge on Tuesday dismissed for the second time a proposed class action made up of foreign shepherds working in the U.S. on H-2A visas who said that several ranches failed to pay them minimum wage, finding that federal jurisdiction requirements hadn’t been met.

  • February 14, 2018

    Ford Gets Claims Trimmed In Faulty Screen Class Action

    With a May trial ahead on class claims alleging Ford Motor Co. sold vehicles with faulty touch screens to over 500,000 drivers, a California federal judge on Wednesday pared class claims for two states, leaving eight state classes and others in the litigation.

  • February 14, 2018

    BNY Mellon Says Some ADR Investor Claims Are Time-Barred

    The Bank of New York Mellon on Monday sought to pare a proposed class action alleging it has been overcharging holders of American depositary receipts for converting their foreign-currency dividends and other cash distributions into U.S. dollars, telling a New York federal judge that a chunk of the investors’ claims are time-barred.

  • February 14, 2018

    Mushroom Farms To Settle Price-Fixing MDL Class Action

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday granted preliminary approval to two mushroom farms looking to pay a combined $375,000 to settle out of broader class-action multidistrict litigation accusing growers and sellers of the fungi of a price-fixing conspiracy.

  • February 14, 2018

    Workers Claim Retaliation After Lobbing Suit Against HBO

    HBO is punishing production assistants who participated in collective and class action suits alleging the company and a handful of others were cheating the workers out of overtime pay and breaks, according to a new suit in New York state court on Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Kendall Reviews 'On The Jury Trial'

    Judge Virginia Kendall

    As someone who spent half her days last year on the bench presiding over trials, I often find the alarmist calls to revamp the jury trial system a tad puzzling — why is making trial lawyers better rarely discussed? Then along comes a refreshing little manual called "On the Jury Trial: Principles and Practices for Effective Advocacy," by Thomas Melsheimer and Judge Craig Smith, says U.S. District Judge Virginia Kendall of the Northe... (continued)

  • Do I Need New Trial Counsel? 9 Questions To Ask

    Russell Hayman

    Initial selection of defense counsel is usually made at the outset of litigation, long before it is known whether the case may actually proceed to trial. Attorneys with McDermott Will & Emery discuss questions in-house lawyers should consider when deciding whether their litigation counsel should remain lead trial counsel in a case proceeding to trial.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: 2017 MDL Year In Review

    Alan Rothman

    Last year, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation ruled on the fewest MDL petitions and created the fewest new MDL proceedings in decades. But the panel's schedule for this week's hearing session suggests 2018 may be different, says Alan Rothman of Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP.

  • Lessons From President Trump's Failed Judicial Nominations

    Arun Rao

    On Tuesday, the Trump administration announced 12 new judicial nominations. We will soon discover whether these candidates learned from the mistakes of the three nominees forced to withdraw in December after bipartisan concerns arose over their qualifications, says Arun Rao, executive VP of Investigative Group International.

  • The Possible Pitfalls Of A Text Messaging Ad Campaign

    Jarrod Shaw

    Telephone Consumer Protection Act lawsuits increased 17.6 percent last year from October to November, and of the 348 TCPA lawsuits filed in November, 20.1 percent were class actions. Businesses can avoid becoming part of these statistics by following the guidance courts have handed down, say Jarrod Shaw and Elizabeth Thomas of McGuireWoods LLP.

  • How To Control Data As Technology Complicates E-Discovery

    Peter Ostrega

    While technology is making certain aspects of e-discovery faster and easier, it is also creating new challenges as quickly as we can provide solutions. The good news is that there are concrete steps businesses can take to address those challenges, says Peter Ostrega of Consilio LLC.

  • Rebutting Presumption Of Reliance: Lessons From 2nd Circ.

    Brad Karp

    The Second Circuit's decision in Arkansas Teachers v. Goldman Sachs reminds district judges that the opportunity to introduce evidence in opposition to class certification and rebut the fraud-on-the-market presumption of reliance needs to be a meaningful one, say attorneys with Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP.

  • How The Cybersecurity Legal Landscape Changed In 2017

    Jonathan Kolodner

    Over the last year, the existential risk posed by cyberattacks and data security vulnerabilities has become one of the top concerns for boards of directors, management, government agencies and the public. 2017 was punctuated by a series of headline-grabbing breaches, fast-moving regulatory developments around the globe, and record-breaking settlements by companies, say attorneys with Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • 3 Antitrust Cases Drug Companies Should Watch This Year

    Chad Peterman

    Pending cases involving biosimilar competition, the Noerr-Pennington doctrine and claims brought by state attorneys general highlight the need for pharmaceutical companies to assess the antitrust implications of their strategies, say Chad Peterman and Carl Minniti of Paul Hastings LLP.

  • Ruling On Short Sandwiches May Cast A Long Shadow

    J. Philip Calabrese

    One of 2017's most significant product liability rulings may have been the Seventh Circuit's reversal of a settlement over Subway sandwiches that provided "no meaningful relief" to class members. The decision suggests that defendants will have to do more to settle product claims than simply write a check, says J. Philip Calabrese of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP.