Competition

  • May 11, 2006

    European Regulators Object To E.C. Roaming Plans

    The European Union’s proposed route for reducing roaming fees for mobile phones is off track, according to a group of European telecom regulators, which officially objected to the plan Thursday.

  • May 11, 2006

    Ryanair Slams Air France Over Alleged State Aid

    Frequently tangled up in the state aid web itself, low cost Irish airline Ryanair Holdings has lodged a complaint with the European Commission against Air France, accusing its well-known competitor of receiving an estimated €1 billion in illegal state aid.

  • May 11, 2006

    Amid Takeover Scuffle, Arcelor Sues Mittal

    In the middle of a hostile takeover battle, Arcelor SA has smacked rival Mittal Steel Co. with a patent infringement lawsuit in the U.S., accusing the giant of bootlegging a type of steel used in the auto industry.

  • May 11, 2006

    Gas Dealers Win Settlement In Exxon Price-Fixing Suit

    Striking out against price-gouging in the oil industry, a group of current and former ExxonMobil dealers has settled a class action lawsuit that accused the gas giant of engaging in an anti-competitive scheme to drive the franchisees out of business by unlawfully setting fuel prices.

  • May 11, 2006

    Law Firm Profile: Bingham McCutchen

    For Bingham McCutchen’s antitrust group, the key to advising clients is to always look at a case through the lens of litigation.

  • May 11, 2006

    DRAM Makers Agree To $160M Settlement

    The world’s top memory-chip producers have agreed to pay $160 million to settle allegations that the rivals conspired for years to drive up the price of computer memory for computer makers and consumers.

  • May 10, 2006

    WTO Sets Up Panel Amid Airline Subsidy Battle

    In a dispute that is turning into a complicated and expensive legal battle, the World Trade Organization set up a fourth panel on Tuesday to hear U.S. allegations that the airplane manufacturer Airbus is receiving illegal backing by European governments.

  • May 10, 2006

    Korea High Court Upholds Foreign Sanctions

    Korea’s top court this week upheld a lower court’s ruling against a Japanese firm for illegal price-fixing in a move that reinforces the ability of the nation's fair trade watchdog to take punitive action against foreign companies that violate antitrust laws.

  • May 10, 2006

    Brussels Snapshot: Hammonds

    The Brussels branch of Hammonds has long made a point of maintaining a close relationship with the European Commission, as well as a keen understanding of their policies. But these days, the firm is also focusing on establishing a strong presence in various E.U. member states.

  • May 10, 2006

    Antitrust Class Action Over Cipro Reinstated

    A Wisconsin appeals court has given the green light to a class action antitrust suit against drug maker Bayer Corp., after ruling that the allegations in the complaint full under the purview of state antitrust law.

  • May 10, 2006

    FTC Probes King Pharmaceuticals In Antitrust Inquiry

    As part of its investigation into the potential anti-competitive effects of authorized generics of brand-name drugs, the Federal Trade Commission has requested information from King Pharmaceuticals Inc. related to a patent infringement suit against a generic drug maker over the hypertension drug Altace.

  • May 9, 2006

    Weil Gotshal Attorneys Testify In Malpractice Suit

    Two attorneys for Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP—including the co-head of the firm’s antitrust and competition practice—are taking the stand this week in a long-running legal malpractice suit stemming from the firm’s representation of a retail store in an unfair competition suit against Italian fashion company Fendi.

  • May 9, 2006

    Mittal Ready To Revise Bid For Arcelor

    Facing both competition issues raised by the European Commission and hostility from Arcelor SA's board of directors, steel maker Mittal has offered to revise its €19 billion bid for the rival company in order to hasten the takeover.

  • May 9, 2006

    U.S. And E.U. Less Divided On Merger Analysis

    Changes on both sides of the Atlantic in the past five years have given rise to greater convergence in how U.S. and E.U. competition authorities use economic analysis to evaluate potential mergers, experts say.

  • May 9, 2006

    Sanofi Suit Over Plavix Expands With New Filings

    The antitrust battle against drug makers Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Sanofi-Aventis has expanded once again after a pension fund and a health fund accused the companies of illegally blocking a cheaper version of the blood thinner Plavix.

  • May 8, 2006

    Brussels Snapshot: Jones Day

    A tradition of legal diversity has propelled Jones Day to the forefront of global powerhouses vying for a piece of the fiercely competitive market for merger-review work in Brussels, the firm says.

  • May 8, 2006

    International Antitrust Conference Proposes New Guidelines

    International antitrust representatives at last week’s International Competition Network conference in Cape Town, South Africa finalized a workbook that will improve merger review analyses and established a new unilateral conduct working group, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 8, 2006

    E.U.'s "Mr. Mergers" Joins Howrey In Brussels

    Howrey LLP’s Brussels office will be adding yet another high-profile former European Commission official to its ranks when Götz Drauz, former head of the E.C. merger Task Force, joins on May 15.

  • May 9, 2006

    Coalition Seeks Order To Lower Antitrust Litigation Costs

    In its lawsuit against Wal-Mart, General Motors, Ford Motor Co. and other retailers over illegal price discrimination, a 140-member plaintiffs coalition is asking for a court order that could lead to a significant drop in the cost of price discrimination suits and a surge in competition enforcement nationwide.

  • May 8, 2006

    Revised Patriot Act Takes Aim At Antitrust Criminals, Too

    When Congress enacted the controversial USA Patriot Act in the wake of September 11, public debate turned on defining the balance between public safety and invasion of privacy. But President George W. Bush’s recent renewal of the Act includes a new provision meant to crack down on, of all things, antitrust violations—sparking a fresh debate among competition experts as to the political and legal efficacy of the law.