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Competition

  • October 17, 2018

    Left-Out CRT Buyers Blast ‘Paltry’ $6M Fee-Share Proposal

    Carving $6 million from a massive attorneys' fees award isn’t enough to overcome the fundamental failure to represent indirect buyers of cathode ray tubes from three states originally excluded from a $576.8 million bundle of antitrust settlements, buyers from the excluded states told a California federal judge Tuesday.

  • October 17, 2018

    Sultzer Law Adds 2 Class Action Pros From Wolf Haldenstein

    The Sultzer Law Group has nabbed two Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz LLP partners to bolster its New York City offerings with their extensive experience litigating class actions in areas such as product liability, cybersecurity and privacy, antitrust, employment and securities, the firm said Tuesday.

  • October 17, 2018

    Lens Makers Look To Nix Price-Fixing Claims From MDL

    Several major contact lens manufacturers urged a Florida federal judge on Tuesday to slice two types of antitrust claims off sprawling multidistrict litigation accusing them of conspiring to keep prices high, calling the consumers' arguments fatally flawed.

  • October 17, 2018

    2 Ex-Deutsche Traders Convicted Of Libor-Rigging

    A Manhattan federal jury on Wednesday convicted two former Deutsche Bank AG traders of rigging the London Interbank Offered Rate to benefit their trading positions, setting the stage for a protracted legal fight over whether or not the trial was tainted by compelled testimony.  

  • October 17, 2018

    Au Pair Agencies Say Feds' Brief Dooms Wage Claims

    Au pair sponsoring agencies gearing up for trial over allegations in a collective action they colluded to set low pay rates told a Colorado federal court Tuesday that a recent U.S. government filing in a related case debunks the former au pairs' central theory that the weekly stipend is illegally low.

  • October 16, 2018

    Pfizer Can't Derail EpiPen Pay-For-Delay Discovery: 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday rejected Pfizer Inc.'s effort to shield evidence of a suspected pay-for-delay deal involving emergency allergy treatment EpiPen, saying the drugmaker can't torpedo a New York discovery petition by moving it to federal court.

  • October 16, 2018

    MoFo Nabs Fujitsu's Compliance Head, Ex-Prosecutor In SF

    Morrison & Foerster LLP has hired Fujitsu's head of international compliance, who has also worked as an assistant U.S. attorney in California and New York, to join its San Francisco office, the law firm said.

  • October 16, 2018

    Farmers Say Don’t Kill Monsanto Antitrust Claims In MDL

    Farmers' allegations that Monsanto Corp. engaged in anti-competitive practices by pushing soybeans with a tolerance to a specific herbicide should not be dismissed, they argue, because their suit could show that the company knew farmers would be compelled to buy the product.

  • October 16, 2018

    Dental Suppliers Told Reps Not To Sell To Buying Co-Ops: FTC

    Federal Trade Commission staffers told an agency administrative law judge Tuesday that the country’s three dominant dental supply companies colluded by explicitly instructing their sales representatives not to offer discounts to buying groups.

  • October 16, 2018

    Germany Probing Sky's Soccer Broadcast Deal

    German competition regulators announced Tuesday they are investigating a deal reached by broadcaster Sky PLLC and sports streaming service operator Perform Group LLC to split the rights to show Champions League soccer games in Germany.

  • October 16, 2018

    BASF Offers To Cut Deals On Nylon Buy To Win EU Nod

    Germany’s BASF has made several commitments to the EU in hopes of addressing antitrust concerns stemming from its planned €1.6 billion ($1.85 billion) purchase of Solvay's nylon business, the chemical giant said Monday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Firms Win $3M In Fees In Hartig Product-Hopping Suit

    A Delaware federal judge on Monday awarded Frank LLP, Prickett Jones & Elliott PA and Hausfeld LLP $3 million in attorneys' fees in connection with Hartig Drug Co.'s suit settled earlier this year against Allergan Inc., Senju Pharmaceutical and Kyorin Pharmaceutical over claims the companies engaged in product-hopping for eye treatment products.

  • October 16, 2018

    Trump's Rulemaking Agenda Aims To Cut $18B In Costs

    President Donald Trump's administration is set to launch another round of regulatory actions aimed at what it claims will cut costs for private industry across the country, previewing the fall unified agenda meant to cut an estimated $18 billion in costs from the marketplace that is set to be released Wednesday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Mitsuba To Pay $4.6M To Bow Out Of Car Parts MDL

    Mitsuba Corp. has agreed to shell out $4.6 million and cooperate with its accusers to escape claims in sprawling multidistrict litigation alleging it was part of a conspiracy to fix prices on two types of auto parts, direct buyers told a Michigan federal judge in a pair of proposed settlements on Monday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Google To Charge Phone Makers For Apps After EU Fine

    Google Inc. said Tuesday that it would begin to charge device manufacturers for some of its apps as the company fights a €4.34 billion ($5.04 billion) fine over licensing practices for its Android operating system that the European Union's competition enforcer has deemed abusive. 

  • October 16, 2018

    Qualcomm, FTC Hope For Deal, But Judge Won't Pause Case

    U.S. District Judge Lucy H. Koh has denied a petition filed by Qualcomm and the Federal Trade Commission to delay a partial ruling in an antitrust case in California federal court brought by the commission alleging that the chipmaker engaged in anti-competitive licensing practices.

  • October 16, 2018

    1st Circ. Overturns Class Cert. In Allergan Price Fight

    The First Circuit has overturned certification of a class of buyers who purportedly bought Allergan medicines at artificially high prices, saying the suit didn't offer a way to weed out large numbers of purchasers who never suffered any injury.

  • October 16, 2018

    The Path To Becoming A Supreme Court Advocate

    A look at the careers of attorneys who have dominated oral advocacy at the U.S. Supreme Court over the last decade shows a similar path for men and women, with a few key differences. Here’s how the top 10 male and female advocates stack up.

  • October 16, 2018

    Axinn Enters California With SF Office, Plans To Expand

    Axinn Veltrop & Harkrider LLP announced Tuesday that it has launched a new office in San Francisco, bringing its antitrust and intellectual property capabilities to the West Coast and planning to lure talent to serve its major clients in the state.

  • October 15, 2018

    Deutsche Traders Knew Libor-Rigging Was Illicit, Jury Told

    Prosecutors on Monday began their final pitch to jurors in the Libor-rigging trial of former Deutsche Bank traders Matthew Connolly and Gavin Black, saying trial evidence proves the pair abused the German lender’s position to cash in by gaming the benchmark interest rate.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Must Take A Stand Against Mandatory Arbitration

    Isabel Finley

    Later this week, Harvard Law students will begin bidding on interview slots with the nation’s top law firms. Our institutions owe it to their students not only to require firms to disclose mandatory arbitration provisions in new associate contracts, but also to bar employers from on-campus recruiting if they require these provisions, says Isabel Finley, a third-year student at Harvard Law School and president of the Harvard Women’s Law Association.

  • Myths And Facts About Using TAR Across Borders

    John Tredennick

    Many legal teams involved in cross-border matters still hesitate to use technology assisted review, questioning its ability to handle non-English document collections. However, with the proper expertise, modern TAR can be used with any language, including challenging Asian languages, say John Tredennick and David Sannar of Catalyst Repository Systems.

  • 5 Global Merger Control Developments You Need To Know

    Jason Cruise

    Merger news from the first half of 2018 reflects a global trend toward alignment of enforcement on the national level and on the regional level, say attorneys with Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • 2 Takeaways From The AT&T-Time Warner Ruling

    Nathaniel Wackman

    A D.C. federal judge's decision last month in United States v. AT&T contains important insights that will be influential well beyond the confines of the now-completed $85 billion merger between AT&T and Time Warner, say Nathaniel Wackman and Lee Van Voorhis of Jenner & Block LLP.

  • Trends In Securities Cases Based On Antitrust Allegations

    Samuel Groner

    Increasingly, a company’s disclosure of the existence of investigations into allegedly anti-competitive conduct has triggered securities class action litigation. But recent court decisions have made clear that plaintiffs must do more than simply allege the existence of an investigation, say Samuel Groner and Andrew Cashmore of Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP.

  • What The AbbVie Decision Says About Sham Patent Cases

    Leslie John

    The recent Pennsylvania federal court decision in Federal Trade Commission v. AbbVie is likely to have significant effects on antitrust cases challenging patent litigations as shams, say Leslie John and Stephen Kastenberg of Ballard Spahr LLP.

  • Roundup

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer

    Earlier this year, Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., made headlines with his decision to leave Congress and return to law. ​​In this series, former members of Congress who made that move discuss how their experience on the Hill influenced their law practice.

  • New Support For Insureds Facing Government Subpoenas

    Caroline Meneau

    A recent decision from the Northern District of Illinois highlights the continued litigation around the scope of directors and officers liability insurance coverage for government investigations. Astellas v. Starr is a win for policyholders, reasoning that compliance with a government subpoena is essentially mandatory, say Caroline Meneau and Brian Scarbrough of Jenner & Block LLP.

  • Opinion

    A Trump Supreme Court Nominee Can Be Defeated

    Nan Aron

    The Senate Republican leadership and the Trump administration are racing to fill Justice Anthony Kennedy’s spot on the U.S. Supreme Court. Does opposition to their plans have any chance of success? My answer is yes, because the stakes are so high, people are so engaged, and the records of those short-listed are so deeply troubling, says Nan Aron, president of Alliance for Justice.

  • Limiting Law Firms' Professional Liability Risks: Part 3

    Stuart Pattison

    As clients increasingly look to limit their own liability exposure, they can reasonably expect that their retained counsel should do the same. In this context, a carefully crafted, thoughtfully presented engagement letter can help a law firm strike a successful balance between protecting itself and preserving a client relationship, say Stuart Pattison and John Muller of Sompo International Holdings Ltd.