Business of Law

  • June 17, 2020

    For Black Attorneys, Floyd Killing Hits Home

    For her own well-being, Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC partner April Byrd normally avoids the videos of black men being killed by the police, which seem to surface unendingly, one after the other. But when George Floyd's last moments appeared as a news alert on her phone, she opened it.

  • June 17, 2020

    Law Firm Leaders: Fish & Richardson's John Adkisson

    John Adkisson took over as president and CEO of intellectual property law firm Fish & Richardson PC earlier this year. Here, Adkisson chats with Law360 about how his firm is functioning during the coronavirus pandemic, what work has actually picked up for it during this time, and where he sees the firm going in the next five years.

  • June 17, 2020

    Former FTC Official Joins Think Tank As Deputy GC

    TechFreedom has brought on Asheesh Agarwal as its deputy general counsel and competition counsel to help form the organization's outlook for how antitrust and consumer protection laws should apply to the technology center, according to the Washington, D.C.-based think tank.

  • June 17, 2020

    Judge Refuses To Exit Trans Athlete Suit Over Word Choice

    A Connecticut federal judge said he will not recuse himself from litigation brought by female athletes who oppose transgender athletes' participation in sports, dismissing objections to language he used in the case and saying "objective members of the public" would agree with him.

  • June 17, 2020

    Ex-Okla. GC Who Faked Email Threats Gets Suspension

    The Oklahoma high court on Tuesday suspended the state Department of Health's former general counsel from practicing law for one year after she admitted to sending herself bogus threatening emails purportedly from marijuana advocates while she was in charge of drafting medical marijuana rules.

  • June 17, 2020

    Ex-Felons In DC Can Serve As Jurors After 1-Year Wait

    When civil and criminal jury trials resume at the D.C. Superior Court, a new pool of potential jurors previously barred from serving will now be eligible to sit in the jury box.

  • June 17, 2020

    More Firms Opt To Observe Juneteenth As A Holiday

    The list of law firms making Juneteenth a firmwide holiday continues to grow as 12 more have confirmed that they will give time off this Friday to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States and promote racial justice.

  • June 17, 2020

    DLA Piper Accused Of Double-Crossing Propane Client

    Ferrellgas Partners LP has accused DLA Piper of trying to play both sides of its debt reorganization efforts, saying in a new suit that a leader of the firm's restructuring group accidentally sent an invoice to the company's general counsel that detailed work going against Ferrellgas' best interest.

  • June 17, 2020

    Federal Indictments Return To NYC As Grand Juries Gather

    Court officials say New York City's federal grand juries are meeting in person once again, grinding out a wave of new indictments in the past two weeks after a nearly three-month hiatus and amid continuing concerns about COVID-19.

  • June 17, 2020

    Davis Polk Says Ex-Associate 'Rewriting' Race Bias Suit

    Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP has fired back at a black former associate suing the firm for discrimination, saying the attorney's opposition to a motion to dismiss was an attempt to "rewrite" his deficient complaint.

  • June 17, 2020

    Noel Francisco Stepping Down As Solicitor General

    U.S. Solicitor General Noel Francisco will resign next month after nearly three years as the Trump administration's top Supreme Court lawyer, a tenure marked by high-profile legal battles over President Donald Trump's controversial immigration policies, from the travel ban to the undoing of Obama-era protections for young immigrants.

  • June 16, 2020

    Airman Linked To 'Boogaloo' Charged In Oakland Court Killing

    Federal prosecutors unveiled charges Tuesday against a U.S. Air Force sergeant accused of fatally shooting a Federal Protective Service contract security officer guarding a California district courthouse during recent protests, noting that the man had ties to the extremist "Boogaloo" movement that promotes inciting a violent uprising.

  • June 16, 2020

    How Gorsuch's Textualism Won A Major LGBTQ Rights Victory

    Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch has long preached the importance of looking primarily to the words of a statute to derive its meaning. Here's how lawyers for three fired workers homed in on that judicial philosophy to score the biggest LGBTQ rights victory since Obergefell.

  • June 16, 2020

    DOJ Whistleblowers To Testify On Political Interference

    One of the four career prosecutors who quit Roger Stone's case after senior U.S. Department of Justice officials intervened in the prosecution of the confidant of President Donald Trump will testify before a House committee next week and will be joined by another official set to discuss allegations of political interference at the agency's Antitrust Division.

  • June 16, 2020

    Hiring From The Top: Firms Target Rainmakers Amid Virus

    With the legal industry hit hard economically by the coronavirus, law firms have pivoted their hiring strategy from making "investment" hires to focusing on high-profile partners who can increase their revenues, recruiters said.

  • June 16, 2020

    Cellino & Barnes Battle Ends With Deal To Wind Down Firm

    The warring partners who brought Buffalo, New York-based personal injury firm Cellino & Barnes PC national recognition — and massive profits — have struck a deal to close up shop, according to a lawyer involved in the negotiations.

  • June 16, 2020

    BigLaw Embraces Juneteenth As A Holiday

    BigLaw has gone all-in on Juneteenth, with 17 more firms confirming that they plan to recognize the holiday that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States by giving their employees time off.

  • June 16, 2020

    Sheppard Mullin, Georgetown Law Team Up On Police Training

    As nationwide calls for police reform reach a fever pitch in the wake of George Floyd's death, Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP and Georgetown Law are building a program to train law enforcement officers on how to safely intervene when they see their colleagues step out of line.

  • June 16, 2020

    Clifford Chance Reduces Bonus Pool Due To COVID-19

    Continuing the trend of firms making cuts related to COVID-19, Clifford Chance confirmed Tuesday that it has cut its global bonus pool due to the pandemic.

  • June 16, 2020

    JAMS Wants Justices To Take Up Monster Arbitrator Bias Case

    JAMS is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on a Ninth Circuit ruling vacating an award issued to Monster Energy after an arbitrator failed to disclose his ownership interest in the alternative dispute resolution provider, calling the decision "harmful" to efficient commercial arbitration.

  • June 16, 2020

    Twitter Taps Atty From FBI's Russia Probe As Deputy GC

    Twitter has named former FBI attorney Jim Baker, who worked on the bureau's initial investigation into suspected Russian interference into the 2016 presidential election, as the social media giant's new deputy general counsel.

  • June 16, 2020

    Central NY Courts To Resume In-Person Proceedings

    State courthouses in central New York, including in Binghamton, Rochester, Syracuse and Utica, are set to reopen Wednesday for in-person business including arraignments and sentencings, officials said Tuesday, as the Empire State continues a gradual reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic.

  • June 16, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    As a civil rights reckoning unfolded across the nation in the form of protests and calls for reform this past week, the COVID-19 pandemic's impact wove itself into the fray. Massachusetts is offering testing for those who attended large gatherings, while a California jobs recovery task force declared the coronavirus crisis an opportunity to reimagine society.

  • June 16, 2020

    Calif. Judges Get OK To Defend Rulings During Elections

    The California Supreme Court has approved an amendment to the state's ethics rules that will allow judges to comment on pending cases if the case in question was used to criticize the judge during an election or a recall campaign.

  • June 16, 2020

    Counsel Who Care: How Attys Are Helping During A Crisis

    As coronavirus cases have spread, law firms across the nation have been stepping up to help, from providing pro bono legal assistance to fundraisers and donations. Here, Law360 rounds up some of the latest charity efforts from the legal community in response to the pandemic.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Don't Just Delay The Bar Exam — Cancel It Forever

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    The bar exam tells us nothing about whether a law student will be a competent lawyer, and now that exams have been delayed due to COVID-19, it's a good time to reevaluate why we have it in the first place, says Brian Tannebaum at Bast Amron.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: 5th Circ. Judge Jennifer Elrod

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Judge Jennifer Elrod of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

  • Don't Forget Firm Culture When Adapting To Remote Work

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    While law firms suddenly pivoting to remote work due to coronavirus restrictions are busy dealing with logistical challenges, an equally pressing and perhaps more difficult task may be adjusting a long-standing brick-and-mortar culture to working remotely for the first time, say Heather Clauson Haughian and Grant Walsh at Culhane Meadows.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Goulston & Storrs' Josh Davis

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Boston-based Josh Davis, an employment lawyer and litigator at Goulston & Storrs.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Crowell's Michelle Coleman

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    With distancing and isolation now the norm during the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Washington, D.C.-based Michelle Coleman, counsel in the government contracts group at Crowell & Moring.

  • Conducting Court Hearings Remotely: 12 Considerations

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    As more courts begin to explore remote hearings during the COVID-19 crisis, attorneys and courts should be aware of some of the common concerns accompanying video- and teleconferencing technology and make allowances to avoid these issues, say Attison Barnes III and Krystal Swendsboe at Wiley Rein.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Trial Lawyer Mark Geragos

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    With self-isolation and social distancing now the norm during the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Los Angeles-based trial lawyer Mark Geragos.

  • The Era Of Video Mediation Is Here — Or Is It?

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    Mediator Jeff Kichaven has heard from several first-chair trial lawyers and senior claims executives that they are reluctant to adopt online video mediation even during the COVID-19 crisis, and says this reluctance is grounded in reality.

  • COVID-19 Highlights BigLaw Need For Emotional Intelligence

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    The formula for making decisions at BigLaw firms has historically been rooted in IQ-based factors, but with the ongoing pandemic, lawyers and firm leaders are increasingly dealing with issues that require emotional intelligence — from establishing effective virtual offices to retaining firm morale and client confidence, say Jolie Balido and Tina van der Ven at NewStar Media.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: ABA President Judy Perry Martinez

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    With self-isolation and social distancing now the norm during the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from New Orleans-based Judy Perry Martinez, president of the American Bar Association.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Shaming Of Attys Is Troubling Even During Pandemic

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    Judges have recently rebuked attorneys for wasting judicial resources to resolve minor issues during the COVID-19 crisis, including in a trademark lawsuit over unicorn drawings. But it is unfair to publicly flog lawyers for doing what they are trained to do, says Ronald Minkoff, chairman of Frankfurt Kurnit's professional responsibility group.

  • Don't Be Social Media Distancing: LinkedIn Tips For Lawyers

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    While we need to be physically apart at this time, lawyers and firms should be leaning into social media to reinforce and build relationships, and help guide clients through the coronavirus crisis, says marketing consultant Stefanie Marrone.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Nossaman's Patrick Harder

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    With self-isolation and social distancing now the norm during the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Patrick Harder, a Los Angeles-based partner at Nossaman and chairman of the firm’s infrastructure group.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: ECOStrats' Elizabeth Ortega

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    As self-isolation and social distancing become the norm during the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Miami-based Elizabeth Ortega, principal of legal industry consulting firm ECO Strategic Communications.

  • Remote Depositions: Coming To A Home Office Near You

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    Recent Texas state court orders indicate judges are increasingly requiring parties and nonparties to submit to remote depositions amid the pandemic. However, there are inherent drawbacks to such depositions, including limitations on attorneys’ ability to assess witness credibility, says Edward Duffy at Reed Smith.

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