We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Product Liability

  • April 30, 2019

    Hess Customers Can Continue With Tainted Oil Class Claims

    A New York state judge on Tuesday certified a class of Hess Corp. customers in a suit brought by developers who say Hess breached its pure heating oil supply deals with New York City building owners, who received tainted oil instead, clearing the way for the 6-year-old suit to proceed.

  • April 30, 2019

    States Not Waiting On Feds To Decide What Makes Meat Meat

    With meat made in laboratories a couple years away from hitting grocery store shelves, several states have passed laws banning such food from being labeled as meat. But with no guidance coming anytime soon from federal regulators, those laws will ultimately face preemption challenges when federal agencies eventually weigh in.

  • April 30, 2019

    FTC, Gerber Reach Settlement Over Anti-Allergy Ad Claims

    The Federal Trade Commission and Gerber Products Co. have reached a settlement in the agency’s suit alleging the company made false anti-allergy claims in advertising for its “Good Start Gentle” brand of infant formula, according to an order filed Tuesday in New Jersey federal court.

  • April 30, 2019

    Conrail Must Pay Derailment Suit Costs Despite Tiny Award

    A New Jersey federal judge has affirmed a $10,000 court costs judgment for a man who claimed he was sickened by chemicals unleashed by a Consolidated Rail Corp. freight train derailment, reasoning that he prevailed in his case despite only receiving a small jury award.

  • April 30, 2019

    Columbia Gas Settles Suit With Mass. Family Hurt In Disaster

    A Massachusetts family that was seriously injured when their house was destroyed in a series of gas explosions last September has "amicably resolved" their lawsuit against Columbia Gas, according to a statement Tuesday announcing the settlement.

  • April 29, 2019

    Monsanto Expert 'Micro-Analyzed' By Atty At Roundup Trial

    A hematologist-oncologist hired by Monsanto defended her expertise Monday while testifying against claims the weedkiller Roundup caused a couple's cancer, noting that it's her first time testifying as an expert witness and she hadn't realized "every single word" of her deposition "would be micro-analyzed" by attorneys.

  • April 29, 2019

    Endo Not Liable In Pa. For Defective Mesh Made By Subsidiary

    Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc. can't be held liable for a woman's defective pelvic mesh implant just because it bought out the mesh's manufacturer, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Monday.

  • April 29, 2019

    Chemical Co. Hit With Pollution Charges After Texas Fire

    Intercontinental Terminals has been hit with criminal environmental charges in Texas after a massive fire burned for days last month at the company’s petrochemical storage site outside Houston, prosecutors said Monday.

  • April 29, 2019

    FDA Stalling On Impulsivity Warnings For Drugs: Nonprofit

    A Washington, D.C.-based consumer advocacy group asked a federal court on Monday to force the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to act on its 2016 petition saying dopamine agonist drugs should have a black-box warning about side effects that can cause compulsive behavior.

  • April 29, 2019

    Boeing's Greed Caused Ethiopian Max 8 Crash, Families Say

    The Boeing Co. was hit with 10 new Illinois federal lawsuits Monday by two Canadian families who blame the deadly Ethiopian Airlines crash on the Max 8 manufacturer putting profits over safety and rushing a faulty aircraft to market.

  • April 29, 2019

    Electrolux Can't Escape Heat Over Microwave Handle Defect

    Electrolux Home Products Inc. and Midea America Corp. lost their bids Monday to toss a putative class action in New Jersey federal court alleging the companies knowingly built and sold over-the-range microwaves with defective handles that become excessively hot when the stovetop below is in use.

  • April 29, 2019

    Residents Urge 4th Circ. To Uphold Hog Stink Nuisance Award

    North Carolina residents who won $3.25 million at trial after suing a pork producer over a hog farm's practice of spraying urine and feces into the air urged the Fourth Circuit on Monday to reject the business' efforts to reverse the verdict.

  • April 29, 2019

    NECC Pharmacists Not At Fault For Fake Orders, Jury Hears

    A pair of pharmacists who worked for the New England Compounding Center — whose tainted drugs caused a deadly meningitis outbreak — were not responsible for drugs prescribed to fake patients named after cereal characters and late night talk show hosts, a federal jury heard Monday as their trial began.

  • April 26, 2019

    J&J Talc Supplier Argues For Its Future Claims Rep Choice

    Imerys Talc America Inc. told a Delaware bankruptcy judge Friday that its choice to serve as a future claims representative for people who may lodge personal injury claims against the debtor is qualified for the position and is the only name that has been put forward for the role.

  • April 26, 2019

    Drivers Reach $40M Deal With GM Over Oil-Guzzling SUVs

    Car owners told a Florida federal judge Friday they had reached a deal with General Motors valued at $40 million to $45 million to end claims in three proposed class actions that engines in certain Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain SUVs are defective and guzzle oil.

  • April 26, 2019

    Atty Sanctions Axed In Opioid MDL, Allowing Doc's Testimony

    An Ohio federal judge on Friday scrapped attorney sanctions that would have barred testimony from a high-profile pain doctor in the multidistrict opioid litigation, calling the discipline "too extreme" despite a galling failure by plaintiffs' attorneys to divulge a deal with the doctor.

  • April 26, 2019

    3rd Circ. Partially Revives NFL Concussion Funding Dispute

    The Third Circuit in a precedential opinion Friday ruled that a Pennsylvania federal judge overstepped her bounds in voiding all cash advance agreements between class members in the NFL’s landmark 2015 concussion suit and litigation funding companies.

  • April 26, 2019

    Bayer CEO Says Company Faces 13,400 Roundup Suits

    Bayer AG’s chief executive officer on Friday said the company faces 13,400 suits over the weedkiller Roundup as he defended last year’s $63 billion acquisition of Monsanto to shareholders at an annual meeting.

  • April 26, 2019

    Plains Pipeline To Pay $3.3M For Spill, But DA Wanted $1.2B

    Plains All American will pay more than $3.3 million in criminal fines and penalties following its September conviction on several charges stemming from a 2015 pipeline spill after a California state judge rejected a bid by prosecutors for a $1.2 billion penalty.

  • April 26, 2019

    Drivers Defend $307M Emissions Deal With Fiat Chrysler

    Drivers asked a California federal judge Thursday to sign off on their $307 million settlement with Fiat Chrysler to end class claims the automaker rigged diesel vehicles with special software to cheat emissions tests, saying it's a solid deal.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    Leon Panetta In The Courtroom, Langley And Area 51

    Author Photo

    Over the course of his career, Leon Panetta has served as a U.S. representative, director of the CIA and secretary of defense. But before all that, he was a lawyer. Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP asked him about his legal background — and about little men from outer space.

  • 3 Brexit Scenarios And Their Implications For US-UK Trade

    Author Photo

    Brexit negotiations are likely to result in one of three scenarios later this month: a Brexit deal, no Brexit at all or a "hard" no-deal Brexit. Each possibility will have different implications for the prospects of a U.S.-U.K. free trade agreement, says Dean Pinkert of Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Finding A Voice, And A New Home

    Author Photo

    My Fulbright scholarship project developed after I talked to my grandmother in the Philippines about the cost of her medication. Drugs developed in the U.S. and Europe are typically sold there for prices beyond the reach of many Filipinos. So I advocated for compulsory licensing for lifesaving medicines, says Melissa Martinez of McGuireWoods LLP.

  • State Meat Label Restrictions Face Preemption Challenges

    Author Photo

    Various states have recently enacted or proposed legislation to impose new labeling restrictions for cell-cultured and plant-based meat alternative products. But it is unclear whether these state initiatives could withstand legal challenges based upon claims of federal preemption, say Robert Hibbert and Amaru Sanchez of Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Willett Reviews 'Guilty Pleasures'

    Author Photo

    Professor Laura Little’s new book, "Guilty Pleasures: Comedy and Law in America," will make you laugh and make you think — and to a federal circuit judge who reads the Constitution for the articles, it is ... appealing, says Fifth Circuit Judge Don Willett.

  • Women In Law Need Equal Treatment, Not Affirmative Action

    Author Photo

    The sheer number of women entering the legal profession means gender equality is coming, one way or the other. This Women’s History Month, BigLaw firms should reflect on this with the understanding that they dismiss the flight of senior female attorneys from their ranks at their peril, says Tamara Kurtzman, founder of TMK Attorneys PC.

  • New DOJ Opioid Cases Highlight Importance Of Red Flags

    Author Photo

    U.S. v. Oakley Pharmacy makes it clear that the federal government expects everyone in the opioid supply chain to “know their customers,” in the same way that banks and other financial institutions are required to do, say Michael Blume and Todd Halpern of Venable LLP.

  • Rebuttal

    Visible Diversity Is A Sign Of Organizational Health

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article cautioned against the hazards that can stem from pursuing "optimal" diversity, but overlooks the value of paying attention to visible diversity, says Matt Lykken of Potomac Law Group PLLC.

  • Simple Secrets For Writing A Killer Brief

    Author Photo

    These days, the legal profession offers meager opportunity for oral argument, so we need to focus on being better, brighter, tighter writers. And the key to writing a better brief is grabbing your judge's attention with a persuasive, well-crafted story, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • A Defense Attorney's Guide To Successfully Arguing Damages

    Author Photo

    It is a long-held belief that the defense should not argue damages or give the jury a damages number at trial. But giving a number early and often, even while arguing for no liability, can still result in a defense verdict, says Robert Tyson Jr. of Tyson & Mendes LLP.