Product Liability

  • August 8, 2007

    False Cancer Claims Lead To Chevron Victory

    A judge has dismissed three Ecuadorians from a personal injury lawsuit against Chevron Corp. after they admitted to fabricating claims of cancer.

  • August 8, 2007

    More Plaintiffs Dumped From Bextra Litigation

    The numbers continued to drop in the multidistrict Bextra and Celebrex product liability litigation, as the judge overseeing the massive case dismissed five plaintiffs on Tuesday for failure to prosecute their claims.

  • August 8, 2007

    Novartis Fights Bid For Sanctions Over Remand Issue

    Novartis has lashed out at a bid by two plaintiffs in the Aredia and Zometa litigation over their bid to sanction the pharmaceutical company for refusing to remand their cases to state court, arguing that recent case law warrants that the court deny the plaintiffs’ remand request.

  • August 8, 2007

    Baxter Expands Infusion Pump Recall

    Medical device manufacturer Baxter Healthcare Corp. on Tuesday upgraded its recent Class I recall of Flo-Gard and Colleague brand infusion pumps, asking customers to return almost 1,000 additional pumps to its Phoenix service center for re-evaluation.

  • August 8, 2007

    Pet Owner Sues Chinese Pet Food Co. Over Melamine

    A proposed class action has been filed in a California state court against a Chinese pet food manufacturer and its U.S.-based distributor in a bid to recover damages from alleged injuries to pet owners whose dogs and cats became sick or died from ingesting melamine.

  • August 8, 2007

    Phillip Morris Huffs and Puffs To No Avail

    In a blow to Phillip Morris, a Manhattan Supreme Court justice has given the green light for family members of a deceased, longtime smoker to pursue their design-defect and punitive damages claim against the tobacco giant and other cigarette manufacturers.

  • August 7, 2007

    House Gives FDA More Funding For Food Safety

    Hoping to reverse a trend of cost cutting and shrinking numbers of inspectors, Congress has passed a bill that would increase funding for the Food and Drug Administration by $121.5 million while requiring the agency to follow a plan for improving food safety—a growing concern after the recent health scares over contaminated imports.

  • August 7, 2007

    Cessna Renews Calls for Canadian Venue

    Cessna Aircraft Co. attempted to chip away at the multidistrict litigation over allegedly faulty de-icing equipment on its planes, renewing its call for a Canadian crash victim's claims to be dismissed and transferred to Canada.

  • August 7, 2007

    Fisher-Price Faces CPSC Probe Over Recall Timing

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission has launched an investigation into the timing of a recent recall by Fisher-Price Inc. of nearly 1 million toys made in China that were found to contain hazardous amounts of lead paint.

  • August 7, 2007

    AstraZeneca Whittles Down Seroquel Case

    In an increasingly bitter dispute in the multidistrict litigation over antipsychotic drug Seroquel, AstraZeneca LP asked a federal court on Tuesday to force the plaintiffs to substitute a case scheduled for discovery in September.

  • August 7, 2007

    Judge Reels in "Fishing" Expedition in Philips Suit

    In a putative class action over allegedly defective televisions made by Philips Electronics North America Corp., a federal judge put a stop to what he called plaintiffs attempts to “go fishing” for a new class representative after the sole named plaintiff was deemed inadequate.

  • August 6, 2007

    Judge Orders Fen-Phen Attorneys To Repay $62M

    Three Kentucky lawyers accused of fleecing plaintiffs in a class action over Wyeth Pharmaceuticals' diet pill Fen-Phen have been ordered by a judge to repay more than $62 million, according to reports.

  • August 6, 2007

    Kids' Jewelry, Mostly From China, Poses Lead Hazard

    Hundreds of thousands of children's jewelry tainted with lead are still being sold around the United States, despite the federal government's two-year long effort to treat the threat, and the source seems to be concentrated mainly in China.

  • August 6, 2007

    Ruling Tossing 2 Plaintiffs From Guidant MDL Affirmed

    An appeals court has affirmed a lower court's decision to throw out the claims of two plaintiffs in the multidistrict litigation over Guidant Corp. pacemakers and defibrillators, noting the plaintiffs' attorney's failure to provide the court with requested information.

  • August 6, 2007

    Workers Oppose Verizon's Request To Stay 911 Case

    Office cleaners and asbestos workers currently suing Verizon of New York Inc. for health problems caused by cleaning the Verizon building after the World Trade Center attacks have protested the telecommunication company's request for a stay in their proceedings.

  • August 6, 2007

    CPSC Gets Its Regulatory Fire Back

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission has been granted temporary authority to exercise its full regulatory power despite the fact that the agency is still missing one commissioner. The authority, which will only last for six months, was issued as a provision of a homeland security bill, signed into law by President Bush on Friday.

  • August 3, 2007

    FDA To Use DOD Data In Product Safety Decisions

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that it would begin using military data to help make better-informed decisions about medical product safety.

  • August 3, 2007

    Appeals Court Sides With Goodyear On Witness

    An appeals court has agreed with a lower court decision to throw out the expert testimony of a witness in a product liability case against The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., saying the witness didn't know enough about tires.

  • August 3, 2007

    Appeals Court Applies Preemption To Medtronic Case

    A Wisconsin appeals court joined the chorus of federal circuit courts applying the doctrine of regulatory preemption on Tuesday, ruling that Medtronic Inc. could not be liable for injuries caused by a defibrillator because the Food and Drug Administration had approved it.

  • August 3, 2007

    Fifth Circuit Rebuffs Katrina Policyholders

    In a boon for major U.S. insurers, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit has sided against a group of Hurricane Katrina policyholders in their crusade to hold the companies liable for the water damage their homes sustained at the hands of the worst storm to hit the U.S. in recent history.