We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close
Lead Story Picture
Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP was the only major U.S. law firm to have cut ties with Saudi Arabia as of Friday, following the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, above. (AP)

BigLaw Firms Quiet About Lobbying Ties To Saudi Arabia

Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP is the only major U.S. law firm to walk away from its lobbying relationship with Saudi Arabia after growing condemnation of its alleged involvement in a journalist's death, as five other major law firms are keeping quiet about their ties to the Middle Eastern kingdom so far.

  • Chief Justice Pauses Kids' Climate Suit Ahead Of Trial

    Chief Justice John Roberts issued an administrative stay on Friday in a lawsuit accusing the federal government of failing to protect future generations from climate change, in a move that could delay an Oregon federal trial currently set for Oct. 29.

  • Harvard Trial Delves Into Email Warnings On Admissions Data

    Harvard officials were cautioned against trumpeting the school's admissions boost for low-income students in 2013 because doing so would call attention to more "controversial" data about whether Asian-Americans faced discrimination in the process, according to emails discussed Friday in the closely watched trial.

  • Gas Royalty Owners Seek Final OK Of $221M Deal With BP

    A proposed class of natural gas royalty owners asked Friday for final approval of a $221 million deal, including $147 million in cash and policy changes resulting in tens of millions more in royalties, settling claims in Oklahoma federal court that a BP PLC unit underpaid them royalties.

  • NCAA Athletes Rip 'Myth' Of Amateurism In Trial Closings

    NCAA athletes on Friday blasted the association's rules limiting athlete compensation in written closing arguments of a landmark antitrust trial, arguing that fans won't stop watching college sports if athletes are paid and amateurism is an "economically invalid" myth.

  • HP Unit Owes Startup $2.3M For Software Work

    A California federal jury found Friday that a Hewlett Packard unit must pay a software startup more than $2.3 million for work on a Malaysian banking project, while clearing HP on many of the allegations in a contract suit that sought tens of millions in damages.

  • MIT Workers Win Cert. In ERISA Suit Over Retirement Plan

    A federal judge on Friday approved a class certification bid by employees at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who allege the university mishandled its retirement fund, saying he was not swayed by an argument that the employees had made conflicting claims about the ways in which they were harmed.

  • J&J Unit Agrees To Risperdal Deal Ahead Of Philly Trial

    In advance of a trial that was slated to get underway Monday in Pennsylvania state court, a Johnson & Johnson unit has agreed to settle claims from a Mississippi family who says their son developed breasts after taking the antipsychotic drug Risperdal to treat a conduct disorder.

  • 11th Circ. Says Ga. Can't Copyright State Code Annotations

    The Eleventh Circuit ruled Friday that the state of Georgia cannot claim copyright ownership over annotations made to its official legal code, ruling that people should have "unfettered access to the legal edicts that govern their lives."

  • Sapphire Tycoon Gets Prison For Faking Judge's Signature

    A "privileged" Manhattan sapphire merchant was sentenced to nine months in prison Friday for forging a federal judge's signature, after a prosecutor called such conduct "rampant" and the sentencing judge said the CEO's emails bragging about how easy the caper was spoke to the need to deter other would-be fakers.

  • USC Inks $215M Deal To End Sex Abuse Class Suit

    The University of Southern California announced Friday it reached a $215 million deal in principle to resolve a proposed class action accusing a former staff gynecologist of sexually abusing potentially thousands of women.

  • Labaton Says 1/3 Of Its Open Cases Include Referral Fees

    Nearly one-third of Labaton Sucharow LLP’s open cases came to the firm through referral arrangements, according to a filing Thursday in Massachusetts federal court, offering a peek behind the curtain as the firm faces scrutiny for a payment to a Texas attorney uncovered in the ongoing State Street settlement fee fight.

  • IRS Floats Rules On Deferring Gains From Opportunity Zones

    The Internal Revenue Service on Friday proposed highly anticipated rules clarifying what kinds of taxable gains can be deferred from investments in the opportunity zone program created by last year's federal tax overhaul.