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Telecommunications

  • August 13, 2018

    Insurers Won't Cover Verizon's $95M FairPoint Settlement

    Verizon Communications Inc. can’t use its insurance policies to cover the $95 million it paid out to settle claims that it lied to competitor FairPoint Communications Inc. when it sold off some of its landline infrastructure for $2.3 billion, insurers said in a suit filed in New York state court.

  • August 13, 2018

    Dutch Telecom Says $36M Contract Row Must Be Arbitrated

    An approximately $36 million lawsuit accusing the Dutch telecom Veon Ltd. of fraud in connection with an underlying contract with California-based SteppeChange LLC to help modernize Veon's business practices belongs before a U.K. arbitrator, Veon told a California federal court Friday.

  • August 13, 2018

    T-Mobile, Tribes Weigh In On FCC Spectrum Rules

    T-Mobile and several Native American tribes urged the Federal Communications Commission to ease restrictions on how spectrum reserved for educational content can be used and licensed, saying the move would modernize broadband service.

  • August 13, 2018

    FCC Lifeline Reform Will Likely Harm Tribes, DC Circ. Says

    The D.C. Circuit has paused parts of the Federal Communications Commission's plan to alter the way it awards and disburses funds for the Lifeline program that helps poor people afford phone and internet service, saying eligibility changes are likely to shut out tribal customers rather than encourage network expansion as the FCC predicted.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry. This is the first article in a special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Business Groups Take Up Fight To Amend Calif. Privacy Law

    More than three dozen business groups from the tech, retail, health, banking and other sectors are pushing California lawmakers working on making "technical" changes to a hastily enacted landmark privacy law to address some of the more "unworkable" aspects of the statute and to extend the compliance deadline. 

  • August 10, 2018

    Qualcomm Fights 'Unprecedented' Class Cert. In Chip Row

    Chipmaker Qualcomm has urged a California federal court not to certify a class of smartphone buyers suing the manufacturer for forcing companies like Apple and Samsung into paying high royalty rates that were allegedly then passed on to the public, arguing the class of 250 million people is unfeasible and "unprecedented." 

  • August 10, 2018

    CA Tech Hit With Investor Suit Over $18.9B Sale To Broadcom

    A putative class of CA Technologies Inc. investors opened a federal securities action against the information technology giant in Delaware on Thursday, alleging multiple disclosure and proxy failures in connection with its proposed $18.9 billion sale to global chipmaker Broadcom Inc.

  • August 10, 2018

    Sinclair Pumps Brakes On FCC Review After Merger Call-Off

    In the wake of its canceled merger with Tribune Media Co., Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. is gearing up for a fight before an administrative law judge even while urging the Federal Communications Commission to drop the proceeding that would probe whether it misled the agency during the merger review.

  • August 10, 2018

    Apple Fights App Store Monopolization Claims At High Court

    Apple Inc. urged the U.S. Supreme Court in an opening brief on Friday to toss a proposed consumer class action claiming the technology giant illegally monopolized the iPhone app market, arguing that it acts merely as an agent for developers who set their own prices.

  • August 10, 2018

    Internet Advocates Blast FCC Copper Retirement Plan

    Communications advocacy group Public Knowledge has told the Federal Communications Commission that rural consumers could be hung out to dry by the agency's decision to expedite the approval process for telecoms wanting to switch from copper to fiber networks.

  • August 10, 2018

    After System Delays, FCC Grants Funds To Alaska School

    The Federal Communications Commission awarded more than $300,000 in funding to a small Alaskan school district that had applied for the money in 2016 but had its application held up by technical errors in the government’s filing system, according to an order.

  • August 10, 2018

    Qualcomm To Pay Taiwan Watchdog $93M To End Patent Row

    Smartphone chipmaker Qualcomm Inc. on Friday announced a $93 million settlement with Taiwan's antitrust watchdog to resolve claims the company refused to sell local manufacturers chips unless they agreed to the terms of its patent licensing, even as its licensing fight with Apple and regulators around the globe continues unabated.

  • August 9, 2018

    Sinclair Investor Sues Over Withdrawn $3.9B Tribune Deal

    A Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. investor filed a putative securities fraud class action against the company Thursday in Maryland federal court, claiming it and its top brass mangled the review process of a planned $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media Co. by knowingly misleading the public about its divestitures.

  • August 9, 2018

    'Sue Me': $1B Tribune Case Charts Where Sinclair Turned Ugly

    Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. sabotaged the favorable odds of completing a highly profitable merger by picking fights with regulators, taunting the DOJ antitrust head to "sue me," and aggressively defending divestiture proposals that government officials were sure to reject, according to a new lawsuit. Here’s a look at the major mistakes Tribune alleges its would-be acquirer made leading up to the deal’s cutoff date Wednesday.

  • August 9, 2018

    'Smart Cities' Can Be Easily Hacked, Researchers Warn

    Hackers could remotely mount "supervillain-level" attacks on so-called smart cities — which use digital systems to coordinate city resources — by exploiting a series of basic security flaws, researchers warned at a cybersecurity conference on Thursday.

  • August 9, 2018

    Wireless Co. Ubiquiti Says Rival Sells Hacking Firmware

    Wireless networking company Ubiquiti Networks Inc. hit rival Cambium Networks Inc. with copyright infringement, fraud and antitrust claims in Illinois federal court over allegations Cambium is selling firmware that hacks Ubiquiti's devices and uses them as a launching point for its wireless service.

  • August 9, 2018

    Comcast Gets PTAB Nix Of TiVo's Programming Guide Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board invalidated as obvious an on-screen TV programming guide patent held by a TiVo Corp. subsidiary, handing a victory to Comcast Corp. in a wide-ranging intellectual property war between the two entertainment companies.

  • August 9, 2018

    FCC's O'Rielly Slams UN Telecom Regulator For Overreach

    Federal Communications Commissioner Michael O'Rielly torched a United Nations telecom agency that he says has strayed too far afield from its primary mission and suffers from structural and leadership problems.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: My RBG Guide To Judging

    Goodwin Liu

    I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the days of RBG bobbleheads and “You Can’t Spell Truth Without Ruth” T-shirts. I had no idea I would become a judge, and I feel lucky every day that I had the chance to learn from her, says California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.

  • Opinion

    It's Prime Time For A Dose Of Reality On Brett Kavanaugh

    Daniel Karon

    President Donald Trump's announcement of his next U.S. Supreme Court nominee, D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh, had the trappings of reality TV. But left unmentioned were Kavanaugh’s troubling opinions on workplace safety standards, age discrimination and class action plaintiffs, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 Things I Learned

    Judge John Owens

    A lot has changed since I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 20 years ago. At that time, I had hair and no wife. I also thought I knew everything — but working for the justice made me realize very quickly that I actually knew very little, says Ninth Circuit Judge John Owens.

  • Opinion

    TCPA: An Antiquated Law That Needs To Be Fixed

    David Carter

    After years of bearing witness to an influx of Telephone Consumer Protection Act litigation, reading nearly every TCPA opinion issued by the federal courts and talking with countless businesses, my conclusion is that the TCPA fails to reach its primary goal of protecting consumers from unwanted calls, says David Carter of Innovista Law PLLC.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: The Equality Lessons

    Margo Schlanger

    In 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, and I began my two-year clerkship with her. In her first opinion as a justice, and in dozens since, Justice Ginsburg reminded us how the law needs to operate if equality is to be a reality, says Margo Schlanger, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • The Future Of Authenticating Audio And Video Evidence

    Jonathan Mraunac

    The recent emergence of artificial intelligence-based technology has prompted serious concerns about the future integrity of recordings. Attorneys must think critically about standards for authenticating audio and video evidence as well as legislative and regulatory safeguards to discourage pervasive manipulation and forgery, says Jonathan Mraunac of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • Protecting Client Reputations In An Online World

    Jim Wagstaffe

    There’s no doubt we live in a world in which the internet has the potential to amplify defamatory communications. As a result, lawyers are increasingly playing a counseling and litigation role in protecting clients from the posting of negative information and reviews, says Jim Wagstaffe of The Wagstaffe Group.

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • Revisiting The Fax Provision: Technology’s Impact On TCPA

    Douglas Brown

    Applying the Telephone Consumer Protection Act fax provisions to e-faxes and similar communications is like applying equestrian regulations to modern automobiles. However, change in Federal Communications Commission leadership and two recent opinions by the D.C. Circuit suggest that a fundamental change in TCPA fax litigation is occurring, says Douglas Brown of Rumberger Kirk & Caldwell.

  • Carpenter And The High Court's Shift On 4th Amendment

    Sarah Hall

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Carpenter is a clear departure from other Fourth Amendment precedent involving information possessed by third parties and individuals’ activities that occur in public. It questions the very premises on which those precedents were based in light of modern technologies, say Sarah Hall and Brian Lanciault of Thompson Hine LLP.