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Telecommunications

  • October 10, 2018

    Record Cos. Rip Cox's 'Ploy' To Move Music Piracy Fight

    The major record labels sharply criticized Cox Communications on Tuesday for pushing to change the venue of their impending showdown over illegal downloading, calling it “a ploy” to avoid bad precedent.

  • October 10, 2018

    Treasury Rolls Out New Rules Widening CFIUS Authority

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury has rolled out a set of new temporary regulations expanding the authority of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, in an effort to ramp up protections for critical American technologies.

  • October 10, 2018

    Let Phone Cos. Do More To Block Robocalls, AGs Tell FCC

    New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood and 34 other state attorneys general have urged the Federal Communications Commission to create new rules that will authorize telephone service providers to block illegal robocalls made to consumers across the country.

  • October 10, 2018

    Man Who Sold Bank Info To Russian Trolls To Serve 6 Mos.

    A California man who pled guilty to selling stolen bank account information later used by Russian online trolls to arrange payments related to an alleged influence campaign intended to tip the 2016 election toward President Donald Trump was sentenced in D.C. federal court Wednesday to six months in prison.

  • October 9, 2018

    Class Action Says DirecTV Partner Regularly Docks Wages

    DirecTV’s largest installation partner, MasTec Inc., was hit with a class action on Tuesday claiming the Florida-based service provider docks employee wages when customers complain about technical glitches to DirecTV.

  • October 9, 2018

    Google Appeals €4.3B EU Fine In Android Antitrust Case

    Google Inc. said Tuesday that it has appealed a record €4.34 billion ($5.04 billion) fine the European Union’s antitrust enforcer doled out in July for abusing the dominance of its Android mobile phone operating system, just before its mid-October compliance deadline.

  • October 9, 2018

    Top 3 Groups Lobbying The FCC

    Lobbyists at the Federal Communications Commission stepped up their arguments last month for why the agency should approve the proposed Sprint-T-Mobile merger and doubled down on backing changes to local small-cell siting rules and the Citizens Broadband Radio Service framework.

  • October 9, 2018

    Mexico Looks To Nix Telco Owners' $500M NAFTA Claim

    Mexico has urged an international tribunal to toss a $500 million North American Free Trade Agreement arbitration claim from a telecommunications company's investors who say the country destroyed their business in favor of Mexico's dominant telecom, arguing the claims are based on a "wholly illogical and improbable idea."

  • October 9, 2018

    Congress Told Satellite Retransmission Act Should Expire

    The National Association of Broadcasters has urged Congress not to renew legislation that allows satellite companies to transmit out-of-market TV stations into a local market, saying the legislation unfairly benefits the companies and hurts consumers by denying them important local news and charging them higher prices.

  • October 9, 2018

    FCC Moves To Bolster Small AM Radio Stations

    The Federal Communications Commission has floated several ways to boost access to the airwaves for small AM radio stations, especially at night, while also preventing these smaller stations from interfering with some of the most powerful stations on the AM band.

  • October 9, 2018

    Infrastructure Group Calls On FCC To Harmonize Tower Regs

    The Wireless Infrastructure Association has told the Federal Communications Commission that it should harmonize competing rules that apply to expanding already installed wireless facilities as a way to speed up 5G deployment.

  • October 9, 2018

    Apple Opposes Qualcomm's Dismissal Bid In Patent Fight

    Apple asked a California federal court to deny Qualcomm’s bid to dismiss portions of a sweeping patent case, saying the chipmaker's promise not to sue over nine patents does not address other claims at issue in the dispute.

  • October 9, 2018

    Network Capacity Buyers Shut Out Of EU Merger Row

    The European Union's top court ruled Tuesday that the European Commission made no legally binding decisions, and thus created no appeals rights, when dealing with telecommunications companies that tried to pick up network capacity that Telefónica Deutschland Holding AG was forced to shell out as part of a merger deal.

  • October 9, 2018

    Trump Says China 'Not Ready' To Strike Tariff Truce

    President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he has rebuffed China’s efforts to hold negotiations aimed at ending the two governments’ escalating tariff battle, declaring that Beijing is “not ready” to make necessary concessions to the U.S. government.

  • October 5, 2018

    Verizon Jumped Gun By Changing Call Fees, Pa. Agency Finds

    Verizon shouldn’t have decided on its own to reduce a telecom’s fees for calls that got routed through the internet based on its own view of a Federal Communications Commission order, a Pennsylvania judge has ruled.

  • October 5, 2018

    Wilkinson Barker Nabs Veteran Telecom Atty As Sr. Adviser

    Telecom industry attorney Michael Nelson has been snapped up as the new senior adviser for the Denver office of Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP, where he will run the public policy shop, the firm said Friday.

  • October 5, 2018

    Preliminary Privacy Settlement Over BART App OK'd By Judge

    A California federal magistrate judge has approved a preliminary settlement for a class that claims Bay Area Rapid Transit secretly collected riders' personal information through a mobile app promoted as a public safety measure.

  • October 5, 2018

    Apple Wants To Hang Up FaceTime Failure Suit

    Apple Inc. has urged a California federal court to toss a consumer class action alleging the tech giant intentionally broke the FaceTime video chat service on older iPhones, arguing iPhone 4 customers didn't adequately back up their damages claims and were improperly suing over the company's design choices.

  • October 5, 2018

    Verizon OK'd For Cell Tower, Ending Dispute With Mass. Town

    A Massachusetts federal court approved a settlement sought by Verizon when it overturned a Massachusetts town’s zoning board’s decision to deny the company an application to build a cell tower and gave it a special permit to construct the tower.

  • October 5, 2018

    Ericsson Insists HTC Must Prove SEP Royalties Breach

    Cellphone maker HTC America Inc., which is suing Swedish telecom Ericsson Inc. in Texas federal court for allegedly overcharging for aging standard-essential patents, bears the burden of proof for its breach-of-contract claim, Ericsson has said in a brief.

Expert Analysis

  • 2 Courts Accept Contract Terms That Limit TCPA Exposure

    Meredith Slawe

    No other appellate court has followed the Second Circuit's Telephone Consumer Protection Act decision in Reyes. However, two district courts within the Eleventh Circuit recently did — holding that consent to be contacted cannot be unilaterally revoked where such consent was obtained in a bargained-for contract, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Widener's Rod Smolla Talks Free Speech

    Rodney Smolla

    In this new series featuring law school luminaries, Widener University Delaware Law School dean Rodney Smolla discusses teaching philosophies, his interest in First Amendment law, and arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court in Virginia v. Black.

  • New Pass-Through Deduction Will Pass Over Many Lawyers

    Evan Morgan

    A few weeks ago, the IRS proposed regulations related to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act's 20 percent deduction on qualified business income for pass-through entities. The guidance offers long-awaited clarity, but is mostly bad news for many law firms, says Evan Morgan of Kaufman Rossin PA.

  • How Reckless Judicial Impeachments Threaten Rule Of Law

    Jan van Zyl Smit

    Judicial impeachment fever seems to be spreading through the states, with West Virginia legislators recently voting to remove their state's entire Supreme Court, and lawmakers in Pennsylvania and North Carolina threatening the same. These actions are a serious threat to judicial independence, says Jan van Zyl Smit of the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Fogel Reviews 'Good Judgment'

    Judge Jeremy Fogel

    In this time of partisan conflict over judicial selection, a new book by Canadian jurist Robert J. Sharpe —​ "Good Judgment" — represents a refreshing, deeply thoughtful departure from binary arguments about how and why judges make decisions, says U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel, director of the Federal Judicial Center.

  • 10 Ways To Prevent E-Discovery Woes

    Debbie Reynolds

    E-discovery is not easy, but employing these 10 strategies may help minimize future headaches, say Debbie Reynolds and Daryl Gardner of EimerStahl Discovery Solutions LLC.

  • 4 Key Components To New Firm Partnership Agreements

    Russell Shinsky

    A well-drafted partnership agreement protects a law firm's founders, establishes a process for new and outgoing partners, and sets forth guidelines for navigating conflict along the way. Startup firms can begin with something less complex, but there are important elements that every agreement should include, says Russell Shinsky of Anchin Block & Anchin LLP.

  • Rebuttal

    Japan SEP Licensing Guide Also Aims To Prevent Abuse

    Jay Jurata

    In a recent Law360 guest article, David Kappos wrote that the Japan Patent Office's new licensing guide reflects a balanced approach to standard-essential patents. We agree. But some of the article's characterizations of the issues underlying SEP disputes are misguided, say Jay Jurata and Emily Luken of Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.

  • Opinion

    Open The Federal Courthouses

    David Oscar Markus

    Forget about cameras, reporters in the Manafort trial were not even permitted in the courtroom with their phones, tablets or computers. That meant no live reporting on Twitter and no emails to the newsrooms with updates. In a world focused on information and news as it happens, this is unacceptable, says trial attorney David Oscar Markus.

  • Assessing 'Concreteness' Under Spokeo In Northern Illinois

    Alex Egbert

    The U.S. Supreme Court's Spokeo decision left lower courts to flesh out history's and Congress' “important roles” when developing a workable legal standard for deciding whether an intangible injury is sufficiently “concrete.” Not surprisingly, the Northern District of Illinois “concreteness” determinations relying on Congress’ role tend to be ad hoc, say Alex Egbert and Tony Hopp of Steptoe & Johnson LLP.