Top News

  • March 24, 2017

    After Repeal Fails, GOP Faces Pressure To Make ACA Work

    The collapse of Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act leaves GOP lawmakers and President Donald Trump facing strong pressure to help implement a law they have bitterly opposed for years, experts say.

  • March 24, 2017

    9th Circ. Nixes Ruling That 'Red Gold' TM Is Generic

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday revived a California jeweler’s trademark lawsuit against Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy Inc. over the term “red gold,” tossing out a trial judge’s decision that the phrase is generic.

  • March 24, 2017

    Dewey Staffer Says She Didn't Think She Committed Crimes

    A former Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP finance staffer told a Manhattan federal jury Friday she did not think she was committing a crime by making improper accounting entries into the law firm’s books, and confirmed that former Executive Director Stephen DiCarmine never told her to do anything inappropriate.

  • March 24, 2017

    Texas Jury Hits Motorola For $9M In HD Voice Patent Trial

    A Texas federal jury on Friday hit Motorola Mobility LLC with a $9 million verdict, finding willful infringement of five patents related to voice quality on phone calls and rejecting Motorola’s claims the patents are invalid.

  • March 24, 2017

    Ex-PSU Prez Found Guilty Of Child Endangerment

    Ex-Penn State University president Graham Spanier was found guilty of one count of child endangerment on Friday after a jury in Harrisburg agreed that his failure to report a suspected child abuse incident involving Jerry Sandusky more than 15 years ago had left children at risk from the recently convicted sex offender.

  • March 24, 2017

    ACA Repeal Bill Collapses In House

    House Republicans on Friday called off a vote to repeal and replace much of the Affordable Care Act, a dramatic setback after President Donald Trump shut down negotiations and tried to force the legislation ahead.

  • March 24, 2017

    Trump Grants Cross-Border Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline

    The U.S. Department of State on Friday issued a cross-border permit for TransCanada Corp.'s Keystone XL pipeline, fulfilling President Donald J. Trump's vow to move the controversial project forward after it was rejected by former President Barack Obama.

  • March 23, 2017

    Dan Aykroyd Breaks Down Booze Bottle Angles In IP Trial

    Comedy legend Dan Aykroyd on Thursday told a California federal jury that a tequila company had ripped off his Crystal Head Vodka brand’s unique skull-shaped bottle, pulling out a ruler to dissect what he said are obvious similarities between the two bottles.

  • March 23, 2017

    Dean Foods Chairman Feared His Wife Was Wired By Feds

    The defense in the insider trading trial of prominent gambler Billy Walters in a New York federal court hammered the government’s star witness on his lies and swindle, little and large, and reveled in revealing former Dean Foods chairman Tom Davis took his wife to a cemetery and asked her whether she was wearing a wire.

  • March 23, 2017

    Dewey Finance Staffer Says She Cooked The Books

    A former Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP finance department staffer told a Manhattan jury Thursday she improperly reversed accounting entries on the law firm’s books and lied to partners and others who questioned the suspect treatments.

  • March 23, 2017

    DirecTV Settles DOJ's Dodgers Channel Info-Sharing Suit

    DirecTV and AT&T reached a deal Thursday to settle the U.S. Department of Justice's claims that the companies illegally shared sensitive information about negotiations to carry the Dodgers’ official local broadcast partner, agreeing to crack down on their executives' conversations with rivals.

  • March 23, 2017

    House Sets Climactic Friday Vote On ACA Repeal

    The U.S. House of Representatives will vote Friday on whether to repeal and replace much of the Affordable Care Act, marking a high-stakes test for President Donald Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress.

  • March 23, 2017

    Tax Court Backs Amazon In $1.5B Transfer Pricing Dispute

    Amazon won a major victory in its $1.5 billion tax dispute with the Internal Revenue Service on Thursday when the U.S. Tax Court ruled that the methods it used to determine payments from its Luxembourg subsidiary for the licensing of intellectual property for online European operations were reasonable.

  • March 23, 2017

    DC Court Rejects Feds' Bid To Save Amtrak Regulatory Power

    A D.C. federal judge on Thursday rejected the government’s bid to preserve a federal statute allowing Amtrak to set performance and scheduling standards along the nation’s passenger railways, saying the D.C. Circuit unequivocally struck down the statute as unconstitutional last year.

  • March 23, 2017

    MF Global, PwC Settle $2B Malpractice Claim

    MF Global and PricewaterhouseCoopers have settled a $2 billion professional malpractice case in New York federal court to the "mutual satisfaction of the parties," the litigants said Thursday.

  • March 22, 2017

    5 Keys To High Court's Cheerleader Uniform Ruling

    To get you up to speed on the U.S. Supreme Court’s complex decision on copyright law and cheerleading uniforms, here are the key things experts say you need to know, including what the ruling says, what it doesn’t and what comes next.

  • March 22, 2017

    5th Circ. Sides With EPA In Battle Over Texas Haze Rule

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday rejected Texas’ bid to strike down the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s regional haze plan for the Lone Star State, instead granting the EPA’s motion to send the existing regulations back to the agency for revision.

  • March 22, 2017

    Labor Nom. Acosta Questioned On Policy, Budget In Hearing

    Labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta’s confirmation hearing Wednesday focused more on policy than scandal as U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions members asked how the law school dean would handle his predecessor’s legacy and navigate a proposed budget cut.

  • March 22, 2017

    Jury Convicts Drug Return Co., CEO In $116M Fraud Case

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Wednesday convicted a drug refund company, its CEO and its chief financial officer on charges that they stole $116 million worth of refunds from pharmaceutical manufacturers and then obstructed a subsequent investigation into the scheme.

  • March 22, 2017

    Suit Accusing FERC Of Pro-Energy Industry Bias Thrown Out

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday dismissed an environmental group's suit claiming the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's pipeline approval process unconstitutionally favors the energy industry, saying there is no evidence that FERC is biased.

Expert Analysis

  • Google, NASA, Planes And A Stronger Legal Team

    Nicholas Cheolas

    Why did minor mechanical issues bring down two airplanes, while a catastrophic engine explosion did not bring down a third? The answers lie, in part, in research conducted by NASA in the wake of those crashes and, more recently, by Google. And those answers can help organizations build better teams to meet today’s legal industry challenges, says Nicholas Cheolas of Zelle LLP.

  • 10 Tips For Better Legal Negotiations

    Marc J. Siegel

    Like everything else, the art of negotiation starts by having a conversation. It’s about being respectful, finding common ground, knowing what you want and, most importantly, listening. A conversation between two lawyers can be complicated at best, but by employing a few techniques and tactics, it doesn’t have to be that way, says Marc Siegel of Siegel & Dolan Ltd.

  • Monthly Column

    Gray Matters: Decision Error

    Gray Matters

    Lawyers make hundreds of decisions during the course of advising a client, consummating a transaction or litigating a case. In this new column, dispute resolution experts Bob Creo and Selina Shultz explore the theory, science and practical aspects of how decisions are made in the legal community.

  • Law Schools And Law Firms: Seeking Common Ground

    Randy Gordon

    What we don’t know is whether the teaching and practice of law are undergoing massive structural changes or we’re still digging out from the worst economic collapse since the Depression. But what we do know is that the missions of the most forward-looking law schools and law firms are converging in ways that were unimaginable 10 years ago, says Randy Gordon, a partner at Gardere Wynne Sewell LLP and executive professor of law at Te... (continued)

  • Not From Around Here? Trying A Case As An Out-Of-Towner

    William Oxley

    The importance of authenticity is magnified when trying a case outside your home jurisdiction. While using references to local landmarks or history can help make arguments relatable, adopting local expressions or style in an attempt to ingratiate oneself with the judge and jury almost always backfires, say William Oxley and Meghan Rohling Kelly of Dechert LLP.

  • How The Most Profitable Law Firms Structure Their C-Suites

    Anita Turner

    The most successful Am Law 200 law firms have evolved from being partner-run to being run by a group of highly skilled professionals reporting to firm shareholders. The data collected from our recent survey indicates this model is generally conducive to increased profitability, says Anita Turner, senior director at Colliers International.

  • Settlement Strategy: What Does The Client Really Want?

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    The best outside counsel think like the client. That includes understanding the client’s perspectives and goals with regard to reaching a settlement — because “good results” mean different things for different clients. Outside counsel must ask themselves the right questions, and know the answers, to shape a client-focused settlement strategy, say Kate Jackson of Cummins Inc. and Patrick Reilly of Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Reflections From A Mock Trial

    Lora Brzezynski

    Nerves were high on the day of the trial. While technically client interests were not at stake, our reputations were still on the line. We were not only presenting our case in front of our newly acquainted colleagues, but also for partners at our firm, expert witnesses, federal judges and in-house counsel — potential employers and clients, say attorneys with Dentons, sharing their recent mock trial experience.

  • Data Analytics Now Cost-Effective For Smaller Firms

    Chris Paskach

    A recent survey found that nearly two-thirds of Am Law 200 firms are now using data analytics, compared to only about a tenth of regional and boutique firms. Yet the exploding market for data analytics technology in business is making these productivity tools available for any size matter or firm, say Christopher Paskach of The Claro Group and Douglas Johnston Jr. of Five Management LLC.

  • New Business Opportunities In Shared Workspaces

    Philippe Houdard

    For decades, law firms have taken on considerable expense to acquire or rent opulent office space, often with the intention of signaling seriousness and reliability to their clients. But more recently, solo practitioners and established firms alike have started breaking tradition, says Philippe Houdard, co-founder of Pipeline Workspaces.