Top News

  • March 21, 2017

    Justices Greenlight 4th Amendment Claims After Court Date

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday said the Fourth Amendment allows wrongly imprisoned defendants to sue even after the start of a case against them, but the court refused to rule as to whether defendants can sue for malicious prosecution.

  • March 21, 2017

    High Court Throws Out Laches Defense For Patent Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court decided Tuesday that laches cannot be a defense in many patent infringement cases, holding in a case over adult diapers that its 2014 decision largely eliminating the defense in copyright cases applies equally to patent law.

  • March 21, 2017

    High Court Strikes Down Disputed NLRB GC Nomination

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that onetime acting National Labor Relations Board General Counsel Lafe Solomon improperly served as acting counsel while he awaited U.S. Senate confirmation to a permanent appointment, upholding a D.C. Circuit ruling that most of his three-year tenure violated the Federal Vacancies Reform Act.

  • March 20, 2017

    Dewey Execs Say State's Secrecy Warrants Dismissal

    Former Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP executives Stephen DiCarmine and Joel Sanders asked a New York judge on Monday to dismiss all charges in the middle of their fraud retrial, saying prosecutors' failure to disclose details about witnesses' statements had crippled their defense.

  • March 20, 2017

    Partisan Sparks Fly At Gorsuch Hearing’s First Day

    Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump's pick for the U.S. Supreme Court, pushed back against accusations of bias at the opening of his confirmation hearing Monday, as criticisms over the Senate delay on filling the late Justice Antonin Scalia's seat dominated much of the first day.

  • March 20, 2017

    FBI Confirms Probe Into Possible Trump Team Ties To Russia

    FBI Director James Comey on Monday confirmed that the FBI is investigating both links between, and potential coordination between, election campaign officials for President Donald Trump and the Russian government, while throwing cold water on Trump’s claims that he had been wiretapped by the previous administration.

  • March 20, 2017

    High Court Won't Hear Menendez Corruption Charges Appeal

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday dealt a blow to U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., when the justices refused to review a Third Circuit decision upholding his corruption charges based on an inquiry into the senator's motives to determine whether legislative acts are constitutionally protected.

  • March 19, 2017

    Canada Prevails In $383M Eli Lilly Case

    Canada has prevailed in a CA$500 million ($383 million) arbitration claim filed by U.S. drugmaker Eli Lilly over the alleged wrongful termination of its drug patents.

  • March 17, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Backs Dow's $5.9M Fee Award In Bayer Patent Case

    The Federal Circuit on Friday upheld a lower court's decision that Bayer must pay Dow $5.9 million in attorneys' fees because its suit against Dow over soybean patents was based on a "contorted reading" of a license and "should never have been filed."

  • March 17, 2017

    Treaties Bar Muslim Bias Suit Against Airline, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge on Friday tossed a $120 million discrimination suit from a group of friends who alleged they were kicked off an American Airlines flight from Toronto to New York in 2015 because they looked Muslim, saying their claims are barred by international treaties.

  • March 17, 2017

    Trump Asks DC Circ. For Power To Fire CFPB Chief

    The Trump administration said Friday that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s leadership structure was unconstitutional and asked the D.C. Circuit to allow the U.S. president to fire the bureau’s director at will, but stopped short of asking the court to eliminate the agency.

  • March 17, 2017

    Trump’s DOL To Embrace ‘Humility,’ Acting Solicitor Says

    The new acting solicitor of labor revealed a more compliance-focused agenda for the agency under President Donald Trump on Friday, stressing the need for “a little bit more humility” at the Labor Department following its heavy enforcement and regulatory activity during the Obama administration.

  • March 17, 2017

    EU Regulators Demand Policy Tweaks From Facebook, Twitter

    Social media giants including Facebook Inc. and Twitter Inc. have a month to propose changes to their terms of use policies to comply with European consumer protection laws and address scams that occur via their platforms, or else face “enforcement action,” the European Union’s top regulators said on Friday.

  • March 17, 2017

    Pastor, Tech Expert Guilty Of Bitcoin Bank Bribery Scheme

    A Manhattan federal jury convicted New Jersey pastor Trevon Gross and Florida tech expert Yuri Lebedev on Friday on charges that they schemed to co-opt a small credit union in order to make it easier to process unlawful bitcoin-dollar exchanges and to obstruct a government investigation.

  • March 16, 2017

    Trump's Proposed DOJ Budget Could Cut Civil Rights Funding

    The Trump administration's Thursday proposal to cut the U.S. Department of Justice’s budget even as spending on immigration enforcement and other areas increases is another indication that the new administration will put less emphasis on civil rights, fair lending, antitrust and other areas, experts say.

  • March 16, 2017

    Dewey Defense Takes Aim At Cooperator's Plea Change

    A lawyer for a former Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP executive being tried a second time for fraud sought on Thursday to undermine the credibility of a primary government cooperator by grilling him about his change in guilty plea.

  • March 16, 2017

    Ex-Immigration Atty Gets 40 Years For Kidnapping Scheme

    A Harvard Law graduate and disbarred former San Francisco immigration attorney who admitted to kidnapping a woman and pretending to be an elite criminal in a failed ransom-seeking scheme will spend 40 years in prison for his strange crime spree, according to a Thursday sentencing order.

  • March 16, 2017

    Judge Says Jury In $2B PwC Malpractice Row 'Confused'

    The New York federal judge presiding at MF Global’s $2 billion professional malpractice suit against accounting giant PricewaterhouseCoopers on Thursday suggested that jurors in the case are probably “enormously confused” by the testimony and suggested the jury be given a primer on the evidence they’ve seen so far.

  • March 16, 2017

    De Blasio Will Not Face Federal Fundraising Charges In NY

    The acting top Manhattan federal prosecutor on Thursday announced that New York Mayor Bill de Blasio will not face federal criminal charges following an investigation into claims of fundraising misconduct.

  • March 16, 2017

    Trump Seeks $2.5B Cut For DOL Budget

    The U.S. Department of Labor’s funding would be scaled back by 21 percent to $9.6 billion under a 2018 budget proposal unveiled Thursday by the White House, cutting deeply into job training programs for senior citizens and young people from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Expert Analysis

  • It’s Time To Change The Law Firm Business Model

    Lucia Chiocchio

    Every year, statistics reveal very little change in the number of women and minorities in the ranks of partnership. So how do law firms change this painfully slow rate of progress? It takes more than adding a diversity policy or a women’s leadership program to the current law firm business model, says Lucia Chiocchio, co-chair of Cuddy & Feder LLP's telecommunications and land use, zoning & development groups.

  • Avoiding The Hidden Costs Of Bargain-Priced E-Discovery

    Michael Cousino

    Many organizations are interested in finding electronic discovery partners who offer tantalizingly low prices for electronic discovery services. However, unforeseen gaps, lax security practices, ignorance of global practices and delayed deliverables can all add up to a surprisingly large final cost, says Michael Cousino of Epiq Systems.

  • Saving Lawyers 1 Breath At A Time: Mindfulness In The Law

    Jennifer Gibbs

    As critical as lawyers are to society, they are reported to be the most frequently depressed occupational group in the United States. In response to the inherently stressful nature of the practice of law, more and more lawyers are turning to an ancient contemplative practice called “mindfulness,” says Jennifer Gibbs of Zelle LLP.

  • Understanding How Blockchain Could Impact Legal Industry

    R. Douglas Vaughn

    Blockchain is essentially a computerized public ledger that can apply to almost anything that a person might save into a database or spreadsheet. This versatile technology may enhance the legal industry by providing an improved record keeping system, setting up "smart contracts" and tracking intellectual property and land records, say R. Douglas Vaughn and Anna Outzen of Deutsch Kerrigan LLP.

  • 7 Legal Industry Predictions For 2017

    Haley Altman

    Since 2008, the legal relationship dynamic has consistently evolved, leading clients to demand more "value" for services received. In 2017, investment in and adoption of new technology and prioritizing cybersecurity will lead to an increase in billable hours and shifts in realization rates, says Haley Altman of Doxly.

  • 5 Ways To Fight Costlier Legal Malpractice Claims In 2017

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    There are a number of concrete, practical steps that law firms can take to address the high cost of defending legal malpractice claims, both before and after a claim is made, says Richard Simpson, a partner with Wiley Rein LLP who serves on the ABA Standing Committee on Lawyers’ Professional Liability.

  • The Path To The California Bench

    Judge George F. Bird

    Ever consider applying for a judicial appointment in California? Get the lay of the land from Judge George Bird of the Los Angeles Superior Court and Kimberly Knill, a senior appellate court attorney for the California Court of Appeal. Additionally, hear what several recent appointees to the LA Superior Court thought of the judicial selection process.

  • 3 Tips To Avoid Being On The Outs With In-House Counsel

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    When trial lawyers fail to recognize the unique challenges faced by in-house counsel, it jeopardizes not only the outcome of the case, but also the opportunities for future representation. These few simple strategies are hardly rocket science, but they are too often neglected, says Matthew Whitley
 of Beck Redden LLP.

  • The Horrible Conflict Between Biology And Women Attorneys

    Anusia Gillespie

    Women leave law firms for many of the same reasons men do, but also face challenges including headwinds with respect to assignment delegation and social outings, as well as potential disruptions if they choose to have children. Firms can increase investment in talent management and improve retention and engagement of women attorneys, says Anusia Gillespie of Banava Consulting.

  • Managing Intergenerational Differences Within Your Law Firm

    Najmeh Mahmoudjafari

    We are privileged to be part of an employment market that hosts employees from various generations. While “differences” may imply inherent conflict, intergenerational differences can actually be used to an advantage for organizations — especially law firms, say Najmeh Mahmoudjafari, founder of ImmigraTrust Law, and William Martucci of Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP.