Top News

  • December 3, 2009

    $203M Kickback Verdict For SC Johnson Upheld

    A Wisconsin appeals court has affirmed a $203.8 million judgment in favor of S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. stemming from an alleged kickback scheme between S.C. Johnson employees and trucking companies that bilked the company of millions of dollars.

  • December 3, 2009

    Jury Convicts Petters In $3.6B Ponzi Trial

    A jury has convicted fallen business magnate Thomas J. Petters of carrying out a $3.6 billion Ponzi scheme, and the founder of Petters Group Worldwide LLC now faces the possibility of spending the rest of his life behind bars.

  • December 2, 2009

    EPA To Mull Quashing Bush-Era Fuel Emissions Rule

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the withdrawal of a Bush administration rule that went into effect the day President Barack Obama was sworn into office exempting certain manufacturing byproducts used for fuel from hazardous waste regulations.

  • December 2, 2009

    Amazon Loses Bid To Challenge Google Books Deal

    The federal judge overseeing the ongoing suit over the use of copyrighted works in Google Inc.'s online library has refused Amazon.com Inc.'s request to reconsider his preliminary approval of a revised settlement in the case, saying the court would address the nuanced issues during a fairness hearing in February.

  • December 2, 2009

    House Committee OKs New Federal Insurance Office

    Legislators have thrown their support behind the creation of a Federal Insurance Office that would have some authority to negotiate international insurance agreements and make recommendations regarding industry regulations.

  • December 2, 2009

    Ex-CFTC Chair Calls For Tougher OTC Derivative Regs

    Over-the-counter derivatives must be more heavily regulated to avoid a repeat of the current financial crisis, former U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission chair Brooksley Born told members of Congress in a hearing Wednesday.

  • December 2, 2009

    Senate Builds Support For Lowering Civil Pleading Bar

    U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., on Wednesday vowed to pass legislation reversing two recent Supreme Court rulings raising the civil pleading standard, saying the pair of narrow decisions are effectively closing citizens out of courthouses and undermining Congress.

  • December 2, 2009

    House Panel OKs Agency To Break Up Major Cos.

    The U.S. House of Representatives' Financial Services Committee on Wednesday approved a controversial bill giving federal authorities broad new powers to shrink and dismantle systemically significant companies, advancing a key piece of Democrats' financial regulatory reform package.

  • December 1, 2009

    Rothstein Pleads Not Guilty To $1.2B Ponzi Scheme

    South Florida lawyer Scott W. Rothstein has pled not guilty to federal charges that he operated a $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme out of his firm Rothstein Rosenfeldt & Adler PA.

  • December 1, 2009

    21 States Win $25M Settlement In Vitamin Suit

    Twenty-one states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have won a $25 million settlement from a group of vitamin makers that allegedly conspired to fix vitamin prices between 1988 and 2000.

  • December 1, 2009

    European Vioxx Claims Don't Stand In US: 5th Circ.

    A federal appeals court has nixed a bid by a group of foreign citizens to join multidistrict product liability litigation in the U.S. over Merck & Co.'s painkiller Vioxx, clearing the way for those cases to be heard in their respective foreign forums.

  • December 1, 2009

    Law Firms Likely To Hike Billing Rates In 2010: Survey

    Law firms are likely to raise average billing rates by about 3.2 percent in 2010 despite pressure from clients to continue at past or discounted rates, a new survey reports.

  • December 1, 2009

    Drugmakers Fined $6M Over Viagra, Cialis, Levitra

    The Swiss Competition Commission has fined Pfizer Inc., Eli Lilly & Co., and Bayer AG a total of 5.7 million francs ($5.71 million) for allegedly fixing the prices of erectile dysfunction medications.

  • November 30, 2009

    Dubai World Restructuring Won't Spark Exodus: Experts

    Dubai's announcement that it will restructure state-owned investment company Dubai World could create more work and opportunities for certain law firms, while harming others, but no one expects international lawyers to begin fleeing the city-state en masse, according to experts based in the area.

  • November 30, 2009

    Wal-Mart Wins Union Closure Suit In Canada High Court

    Canada's highest court has handed Wal-Mart Canada Corp. a victory against former employees who claimed they were wrongly fired when the retail giant shuttered one of its Quebec locations, allegedly to put an end to the company's first union in North America.

  • November 30, 2009

    EU President Taps New Antitrust Chief, Other Top Jobs

    The president of the European Commission has picked Spanish socialist Joaquin Almunia to be Europe's new top antitrust regulator, moving Almunia from his current position as head of Europe's economic and monetary affairs commission to the increasingly prestigious and powerful post of competition commissioner.

  • November 30, 2009

    Supreme Court Denies Ford's Appeal Of $83M Award

    Effectively ending a messy four-year court battle, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Monday not to hear Ford Motor Co.'s last-ditch effort to overturn an $82.6 million ruling in favor of a woman who claimed that a vehicular defect rendered her a paraplegic.

  • November 30, 2009

    Generic-Drug Labels Must Provide Warnings: 8th Circ.

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit has determined that generics manufacturers have a responsibility to provide adequate warnings on the labels of their drugs, in the first federal preemption case of this kind to be ruled on at the appellate level.

  • November 30, 2009

    Supreme Court To Take Up 'Foreign-Cubed' Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case examining the question of whether anti-fraud provisions of U.S. securities laws should extend to transnational securities issues, breaking with the opinion of the solicitor general that the high court should skip the case.

  • November 25, 2009

    Hyundai Must Pay $8M For Ducking Discovery: Court

    Washington state's high court has reinstated an $8 million default judgment against Hyundai Motor Co., siding with a trial court that said the carmaker frustrated discovery in a case brought by a paraplegic claiming a Hyundai seat defect caused his injury.