Top News

  • March 23, 2017

    MF Global, PwC Settle $2B Malpractice Claim

    MF Global and PricewaterhouseCoopers have settled a $2 billion professional malpractice case in New York federal court to the "mutual satisfaction of the parties," the litigants said Thursday.

  • March 22, 2017

    5 Keys To High Court's Cheerleader Uniform Ruling

    To get you up to speed on the U.S. Supreme Court’s complex decision on copyright law and cheerleading uniforms, here are the key things experts say you need to know, including what the ruling says, what it doesn’t and what comes next.

  • March 22, 2017

    5th Circ. Sides With EPA In Battle Over Texas Haze Rule

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday rejected Texas’ bid to strike down the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s regional haze plan for the Lone Star State, instead granting the EPA’s motion to send the existing regulations back to the agency for revision.

  • March 22, 2017

    Labor Nom. Acosta Questioned On Policy, Budget In Hearing

    Labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta’s confirmation hearing Wednesday focused more on policy than scandal as U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions members asked how the law school dean would handle his predecessor’s legacy and navigate a proposed budget cut.

  • March 22, 2017

    Jury Convicts Drug Return Co., CEO In $116M Fraud Case

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Wednesday convicted a drug refund company, its CEO and its chief financial officer on charges that they stole $116 million worth of refunds from pharmaceutical manufacturers and then obstructed a subsequent investigation into the scheme.

  • March 22, 2017

    Suit Accusing FERC Of Pro-Energy Industry Bias Thrown Out

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday dismissed an environmental group's suit claiming the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's pipeline approval process unconstitutionally favors the energy industry, saying there is no evidence that FERC is biased.

  • March 22, 2017

    High Court Narrows Use Of Structured Dismissals In Ch. 11

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the use of so-called structured dismissals to end Chapter 11 cases must be narrowed, holding that a settlement that effectively wiped out employee claims against a trucking company but paid more junior creditors impermissibly sidestepped the U.S. Bankruptcy Code's creditor priority.

  • March 22, 2017

    High Court Says Cheerleader Uniform Copyrightable

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that decorative elements of a cheerleading uniform could be protected by copyright law, a ruling it said was aimed at resolving “widespread disagreement” on when such designs are eligible for protection.

  • March 22, 2017

    Pharmacist Convicted Of Racketeering, Cleared Of Murder

    A Massachusetts pharmacist was convicted Wednesday of a wide-ranging racketeering scheme for selling deadly drugs, but was cleared of murder charges stemming from the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak.

  • March 21, 2017

    Gorsuch Rebukes Trump, Defends Record To Senate Panel

    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch pushed back Tuesday at attacks on his record and rebuked President Donald Trump’s comments on the judiciary as he sought to persuade a Senate panel to advance his nomination to the nation's highest court.

  • March 21, 2017

    Justices' Laches Decision Could Be Boon For Patent Owners

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision Tuesday that laches cannot be used as a defense in many patent cases could strengthen the hand of patent owners and lead to larger damages in certain instances, while forcing companies who might be targeted with infringement claims to be more wary of older patents.

  • March 21, 2017

    Ex-Dean Foods Chair Lists Years Of Insider Tips To Gambler

    New York federal prosecutors in the insider trading trial of prominent gambler Billy Walters led their star witness, a former Dean Foods chairman and current government cooperator, through his litany of shame as he told the jury he had tipped inside information to Walters so many times that he couldn’t count.

  • March 21, 2017

    Disney Accused Of Stealing Idea For 'Zootopia' Movie

    The Walt Disney Co. was hit with a copyright lawsuit Thursday accusing the studio of stealing much of its smash hit “Zootopia” from a prominent screenwriter’s unproduced treatment.

  • March 21, 2017

    Trump Starts Putting Imprint On Judiciary With 6th Circ. Nom

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday picked Kentucky federal Judge Amul J. Thapar for a spot on the Sixth Circuit, marking the first judicial nomination since the selection of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • March 21, 2017

    Philly DA Hit With Federal Corruption Charges

    Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams on Tuesday was hit with a federal indictment for allegedly accepting gifts and favors from two unidentified business owners in exchange for an appointment as a special adviser, a promise to intervene in a criminal case and other official actions.

  • March 21, 2017

    Tax-Dodging Moneyman Gets Nearly 6 Years, $10M Fine

    A Manhattan federal judge hit onetime Morgan Stanley banker Morris Zukerman with almost six years in prison and a $10 million fine Tuesday, calling the massive tax dodge he admitted to in June a crime of "unmitigated greed."

  • March 21, 2017

    Web Streamers Can't Use TV License, 9th Circ. Says

    The Ninth Circuit sided with the major broadcast networks Tuesday and ruled that internet streaming services cannot use the same automatic copyright license that traditional cable companies use, reversing an earlier decision to the contrary.

  • March 21, 2017

    Justices Greenlight 4th Amendment Claims After Court Date

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday said the Fourth Amendment allows wrongly imprisoned defendants to sue even after the start of a case against them, but the court refused to rule as to whether defendants can sue for malicious prosecution.

  • March 21, 2017

    High Court Throws Out Laches Defense For Patent Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court decided Tuesday that laches cannot be a defense in many patent infringement cases, holding in a case over adult diapers that its 2014 decision largely eliminating the defense in copyright cases applies equally to patent law.

  • March 21, 2017

    High Court Strikes Down Disputed NLRB GC Nomination

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that onetime acting National Labor Relations Board General Counsel Lafe Solomon improperly served as acting counsel while he awaited U.S. Senate confirmation to a permanent appointment, upholding a D.C. Circuit ruling that most of his three-year tenure violated the Federal Vacancies Reform Act.

Expert Analysis

  • 10 Tips For Better Legal Negotiations

    Marc J. Siegel

    Like everything else, the art of negotiation starts by having a conversation. It’s about being respectful, finding common ground, knowing what you want and, most importantly, listening. A conversation between two lawyers can be complicated at best, but by employing a few techniques and tactics, it doesn’t have to be that way, says Marc Siegel of Siegel & Dolan Ltd.

  • Monthly Column

    Gray Matters: Decision Error

    Gray Matters

    Lawyers make hundreds of decisions during the course of advising a client, consummating a transaction or litigating a case. In this new column, dispute resolution experts Bob Creo and Selina Shultz explore the theory, science and practical aspects of how decisions are made in the legal community.

  • Law Schools And Law Firms: Seeking Common Ground

    Randy Gordon

    What we don’t know is whether the teaching and practice of law are undergoing massive structural changes or we’re still digging out from the worst economic collapse since the Depression. But what we do know is that the missions of the most forward-looking law schools and law firms are converging in ways that were unimaginable 10 years ago, says Randy Gordon, a partner at Gardere Wynne Sewell LLP and executive professor of law at Te... (continued)

  • Not From Around Here? Trying A Case As An Out-Of-Towner

    William Oxley

    The importance of authenticity is magnified when trying a case outside your home jurisdiction. While using references to local landmarks or history can help make arguments relatable, adopting local expressions or style in an attempt to ingratiate oneself with the judge and jury almost always backfires, say William Oxley and Meghan Rohling Kelly of Dechert LLP.

  • How The Most Profitable Law Firms Structure Their C-Suites

    Anita Turner

    The most successful Am Law 200 law firms have evolved from being partner-run to being run by a group of highly skilled professionals reporting to firm shareholders. The data collected from our recent survey indicates this model is generally conducive to increased profitability, says Anita Turner, senior director at Colliers International.

  • Settlement Strategy: What Does The Client Really Want?

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    The best outside counsel think like the client. That includes understanding the client’s perspectives and goals with regard to reaching a settlement — because “good results” mean different things for different clients. Outside counsel must ask themselves the right questions, and know the answers, to shape a client-focused settlement strategy, say Kate Jackson of Cummins Inc. and Patrick Reilly of Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Reflections From A Mock Trial

    Lora Brzezynski

    Nerves were high on the day of the trial. While technically client interests were not at stake, our reputations were still on the line. We were not only presenting our case in front of our newly acquainted colleagues, but also for partners at our firm, expert witnesses, federal judges and in-house counsel — potential employers and clients, say attorneys with Dentons, sharing their recent mock trial experience.

  • Data Analytics Now Cost-Effective For Smaller Firms

    Chris Paskach

    A recent survey found that nearly two-thirds of Am Law 200 firms are now using data analytics, compared to only about a tenth of regional and boutique firms. Yet the exploding market for data analytics technology in business is making these productivity tools available for any size matter or firm, say Christopher Paskach of The Claro Group and Douglas Johnston Jr. of Five Management LLC.

  • New Business Opportunities In Shared Workspaces

    Philippe Houdard

    For decades, law firms have taken on considerable expense to acquire or rent opulent office space, often with the intention of signaling seriousness and reliability to their clients. But more recently, solo practitioners and established firms alike have started breaking tradition, says Philippe Houdard, co-founder of Pipeline Workspaces.

  • How A General Counsel Should Think About AI: Part 2

    Bruce J. Heiman

    General counsels face the challenging task of understanding how companies can navigate the rules surrounding uses of artificial intelligence. To get smart on AI, general counsels must ask the right questions about areas such as human resources, intellectual property, liability and insurance, say Bruce Heiman and Elana Reman of K&L Gates LLP.