Top News

  • May 26, 2017

    McDonald's Grills Bookkeeping Expert In Unpaid OT Trial

    McDonald’s on Friday grilled an accountant who testified the company could owe potentially $41 million in statutory penalties for arranging overnight shifts at its company-run stores in California so as to stiff thousands of workers on overtime, questioning the accountant’s qualifications and methodologies during cross-examination in the damages trial.

  • May 26, 2017

    DC Circ. Rejects Challenges To TSA Body Scanner Rule

    The D.C. Circuit held Friday that none of the arguments raised in a challenge by several advocacy groups to the Transportation Security Administration’s final rule on airport body scanners merited a published decision, saying the regulation sufficiently responded to their concerns and the panel would defer to the agency’s judgment.

  • May 26, 2017

    Judge Reopens ParkerVision Patent Suit Against Apple, LG

    A Florida federal judge on Friday reopened wireless communications company ParkerVision Inc.'s smartphone patent dispute against Apple, LG and Qualcomm after the end of a related U.S. International Trade Commission investigation.

  • May 26, 2017

    Inheritance Interference Claim Won't Fly, Texas Justices Say

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday rejected the appeal in a family dispute of some heirs of a wealthy landowner who alleged that harmful interference by a Jackson Walker LLP partner caused them to lose out on a 2,400-acre Eagle Ford Shale ranch and underlying interests worth $3 million, holding that Texas does not recognize a claim for tortious interference with an inheritance.

  • May 26, 2017

    Google, DOL Fight Over Withheld Compensation Data

    Google and the U.S. Department of Labor duked it out Friday over whether the tech giant must hand over employee pay data related to the government’s look into Google’s equal opportunity program, with the DOL arguing in a California administrative hearing that Google isn’t “too big to comply” with its data requests.

  • May 26, 2017

    Supplier Pays $95M To End FCA Case In Iraq War Food Deal

    Logistics company Agility will pay $95 million to settle a False Claims Act suit related to alleged overcharging on $8.5 billion in Iraq War food supply contracts, it announced Friday, following the earlier resolution of related criminal and contractual disputes.

  • May 26, 2017

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink RJ Reynolds Win In $50M ERISA Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday said it would not review a panel decision upholding R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.’s victory in an Employment Retirement Income Security Act class action alleging that the improper divestiture of Nabisco stock by the tobacco giant’s retirement plan following the 1999 breakup of RJR Nabisco Inc. cost plan participants more than $50 million.

  • May 26, 2017

    J&J's Aveeno Settles 'Natural' Labeling Suit For $6.75M

    Johnson & Johnson will pay $6.75 million and remove an “Active Naturals” label from a line of Aveeno products after consumers complained the name was deceptive since the products contained synthetic ingredients, according to a settlement agreement filed in New York federal court on Friday.

  • May 26, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Won't Rule On Interest In Halo, Pulse IP Case

    The Federal Circuit on Friday dismissed an appeal from Pulse Electronics over a prejudgment interest award on a $1.5 million patent infringement verdict for Halo Electronics in a 10-year-old suit that last year led the U.S. Supreme Court to determine a new standard for enhanced damages.

  • May 26, 2017

    NJ's Top Federal Judge Passing Torch To 1st Hispanic Chief

    U.S. District Judge Jerome B. Simandle will soon hand over his role as the leader of New Jersey's federal court to the soon-to-be first Hispanic chief judge of this busy but understaffed jurisdiction, though Judge Simandle's days of balancing the scales of justice are far from over.

  • May 26, 2017

    Penthouse Must Return Control Of Websites To FriendFinder

    A group of adult websites must be returned to FriendFinder Networks Inc. after a Delaware Chancery Court judge determined Friday they shouldn’t have been included in a sale of its Penthouse business unit in 2016.

  • May 26, 2017

    2nd Circ. Eyes Trader's Recordings In $83M Lehman Pay Spat

    A fabulously wealthy former Barclays Capital Inc. trader invited the Second Circuit on Friday to order the Lehman Brothers Inc. estate to make him richer by $83 million, but a three-judge panel seemed hard-pressed to ignore once-secret recordings the trader made that prompted lower courts to deny him the extra haul.

  • May 26, 2017

    2nd Circ. Won't Save Ex-Venezuela Ambassador's RICO Case

    A former U.S. ambassador to Venezuela and anti-corruption consultant who accused two wealthy Venezuelans of paying bribes and defaming him failed to convince the Second Circuit to revive his case, with the court saying Friday the allegations underlying his racketeering suit were barely related.

  • May 26, 2017

    J&J Hit With $2.16M Verdict In 4th Philly Mesh Case

    Johnson & Johnson continued a string of losses in Philadelphia’s pelvic mesh mass tort program Friday, but the $2.16 million award in favor of a Pennsylvania woman was the lowest figure yet in the four cases tried to verdict and the first to not include punitive damages.

  • May 26, 2017

    BlackBerry Gets $940M Award In Qualcomm Licensing Row

    Canada-based BlackBerry Ltd. announced on Friday that chipmaker Qualcomm Inc. has agreed to pay it $940 million to resolve all payments tied to an arbitration panel’s decision in a licensing dispute, which placed the interim award in favor of BlackBerry at nearly $815 million.

  • May 25, 2017

    UPS Hit With $247M Judgment In Tobacco Shipping Row

    A New York federal judge ordered UPS to pay $247 million to the Empire State and New York City for helping move untaxed cigarettes from tribal lands, saying Thursday the shipping giant had shown a “lack of willingness to change” without a hefty punishment.

  • May 25, 2017

    Teva To Pay $1.6M To Resolve Calif. Counties' Opioid Suit

    Teva Pharmaceuticals Inc. will pay $1.6 million for substance abuse treatment to resolve a lawsuit brought in state court by two California counties over allegedly misleading marketing practices involving opioid painkillers, according to media reports Thursday.

  • May 25, 2017

    GM Hit With Emissions-Cheating Claims

    General Motors on Thursday became the latest automaker to be caught up in allegations of emissions cheating, as a proposed class action filed in Michigan federal court claims that defeat devices — similar to those used in Volkswagen’s diesel cars — are installed in certain models of its diesel trucks.

  • May 25, 2017

    Cleary Gottlieb Beats Ex-Atty's Amended Race Bias Suit

    Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP beat a former project attorney’s suit alleging he was let go because of his race when a Washington, D.C., federal judge found Wednesday that he had failed to show he performed as well as or better than white colleagues kept on after work slowed down.

  • May 25, 2017

    Citing Trump's Kasowitz Hire, Lieberman Quits FBI Job Search

    Joseph Lieberman, the former senator, Democratic vice presidential hopeful and current Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP counsel, has pulled his name out of the running to be the next head of the FBI.

Expert Analysis

  • My Milkshake Is Better Than Yours: Part 2

    Jill Dessalines

    In the second installment of this two-part series on disruptive innovation among mid-size law firms, Jill Dessalines, founder of Strategic Advice for Successful Lawyers and former senior vice president at McKesson Corp., explores a number of ideas for keeping clients and maintaining market position.

  • My Milkshake Is Better Than Yours: Part 1

    Jill Dessalines

    As I sat there listening, incredulous to learn that "Milkshake" was not only a real song but also a chart-topper, it reminded me of Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen’s work on disruptive innovation — and how it pertains to mid-size law firms, says Jill Dessalines, founder of Strategic Advice for Successful Lawyers and former assistant general counsel of McKesson Corp.

  • Attorneys, Your Input Is Needed On Deposition Rule

    Frank Silvestri, Jr.

    Every lawyer who’s handled a civil case in federal court knows about Rule 30(b)(6), governing deposition procedures. But for many real-world deposition dilemmas, the rule offers little guidance. Last year, an Advisory Committee on Civil Rules subcommittee began considering whether the rule should be amended. Now attorneys must advise the subcommittee how to proceed, says Frank Silvestri Jr. of Verrill Dana LLP.

  • How Client Feedback Programs Benefit Law Firms And Clients

    Elizabeth Duffy

    Despite an increase in engagement with client feedback programs over the last 15 years, law firms — and their clients — have a way to go before realizing the maximum benefits such programs can deliver, says Elizabeth Duffy of Acritas US Inc.

  • Solving The Legal Industry's Data Protection Breakdown

    Jeff Ton

    Most law firms today aren't using common security and data protection measures that other industries employ to protect sensitive data. Options like continuous data replication and backups have various pros and cons, but most importantly, law practices must understand the need for a two-tiered approach to data protection, says Jeff Ton of Bluelock LLC.

  • 5 Things To Know About Justice Gorsuch’s First 30 Days

    Charles Webber

    Justice Neil Gorsuch joined the U.S. Supreme Court a little more than 30 days ago, on April 7, 2017. And while it is too early for him to have written any opinions, Gorsuch participated in the final 13 oral arguments of the 2016 term. Charles Webber of Faegre Baker Daniels LLP offers five takeaways from his first month on the job.

  • 5 Mistakes That End Law Firms

    Randy Evans

    Although the end often comes quickly, law firms do not fail overnight. Randy Evans of Dentons and Elizabeth Whitney of Swiss Re Corporate Solutions review five mistakes that expedite law firm failures.

  • What Lawyers Should Know To Avoid Online Scams

    J. S. Christie Jr.

    Scams resulting in access to confidential information are probably a lawyer’s greatest technology and cybersecurity risk. But hackers are more likely to gain access to a lawyer’s computer systems through human error, usually responding to a scam, than a brute force attack, says J. S. Christie Jr. of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP.

  • Opinion

    Let's Talk About Half-Hearted Innovation

    Michael Moradzadeh

    Allowing attorneys to telecommute may seem like a great fix for law firms. But without significant changes to the firm's culture, telecommuting is just a patch applied to the problem of attrition, says Michael Moradzadeh, founding partner of Rimon PC.

  • Monthly Column

    Gray Matters: The Attorney-Client Team

    Robert Creo

    A 1979 study of attorney-client interactions revealed startling information: Despite years of education and training to hone their legal expertise, attorneys were not acting as independent counselors but rather allowing their clients to control them. Our experience is that this trend has accelerated, say dispute resolution experts Robert Creo and Selina Shultz.