• March 16, 2018

    Uber Drivers Defend Standing In Data Hack Suit After Zappos

    Drivers alleging Uber lied about a 2014 data breach that compromised their sensitive personal information told a California federal judge Friday that the Ninth Circuit’s recent Zappos ruling underscores that the mere risk of future identity theft from the hack gives them standing to pursue their putative class action.

  • March 16, 2018

    United Airlines Pay Stub Row May Need Calif. Justices' Help

    A Ninth Circuit judge told United Airlines Inc. pilots and flight attendants Friday that courts have clashed on when California law applies in disputes like theirs alleging an employer's pay stubs fall short of state requirements, saying California’s high court may need to weigh in.

  • March 16, 2018

    Vehicle Safety, 5G Futures Hinge On DOT, FCC Moves: Panel

    A leaderless Department of Transportation's indecision on the future of a vehicle safety regulation has left not only carmakers but the wireless industry and Federal Communications Commission in limbo, some on a panel hosted by New America’s Open Technology Institute suggested Friday.

  • March 16, 2018

    Hartford Needn't Indemnify Trucking Co. For Workplace Death

    A Virginia federal judge on Friday ruled Hartford Underwriters Insurance Co. doesn’t have to pay any benefits on a workers' compensation claim made by the widow of a trucking company employee who died as the result of a workplace accident, handing the insurer a quick win in the case.

  • March 16, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler, Bosch Must Face EcoDiesel Emissions MDL

    Fiat Chrysler and Bosch must face consumers’ fraud and racketeering claims in multidistrict litigation in California over Jeep and Ram diesel trucks allegedly outfitted with emissions-cheating devices, a federal judge ruled late Thursday.

  • March 16, 2018

    Delta Flight Attendants Urge 9th Circ. To Revive Wage Suit

    A putative nationwide class of Delta flight attendants asked a Ninth Circuit panel Friday to revive allegations they aren’t compensated on an hourly basis for all their work, arguing that under California law they should be compensated for work performed on the ground in the Golden State before and after flights.

  • March 16, 2018

    Space Travel Co. Demands Sanctions Over Leaked Docs

    A commercial space travel company demanded sanctions and a strict accounting of "privileged" documents leaked to lawyers of a customer claiming the company got him to agree to a $30 million nonrefundable deposit under false pretenses, according to a motion filed in Virginia federal court Friday.

  • March 16, 2018

    Chrysler Slips Punitive Damages Claim In Ch. 11 Ruling

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Thursday dismissed a punitive damages claim from a suit over a 2014 car crash involving a Fiat Chrysler vehicle, saying the claim is barred by a 2009 sale order for Old Chrysler after its bankruptcy.

  • March 16, 2018

    2nd Circ. Case Doesn’t Clear Kelly In GWB Scandal, Say Feds

    Prosecutors on Thursday blasted the defense argument that a recent Second Circuit opinion dealing with a convicted sex offender supports a former public official's claims that she did not violate residents' civil rights to travel freely by allegedly causing gridlock near the George Washington Bridge in a political revenge scheme.

  • March 16, 2018

    Sunoco Faces Class Action Over Pa. Pipeline Work Damage

    The owners of two suburban Philadelphia homes launched a class action against Sunoco Inc. on Thursday alleging that construction of the company’s controversial Mariner East 2 pipeline caused significant property damage and left them at risk of possible catastrophic explosion.

  • March 16, 2018

    5th Circ. Lifts Block On La. Pipeline Project Amid Appeal

    A divided Fifth Circuit panel on Thursday unfroze construction of a crude oil pipeline connected to the controversial Dakota Access pipeline while a Louisiana federal judge's injunction is appealed, with the majority saying it appears that the injunction shouldn't have been granted.

  • March 16, 2018

    A Chat With Littler Info Chief Durgesh Sharma

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Durgesh Sharma, chief information officer at Littler Mendelson PC.

  • March 16, 2018

    9th Circ. Saves OnStar Consumer's Suit From Arbitration

    A federal appeals court resuscitated a potential class action against General Motors unit OnStar LLC on Thursday, saying the case couldn’t be sent to arbitration because the lead plaintiff didn’t really know she was agreeing to arbitrate when she signed up for OnStar.

  • March 15, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler Loses Appeal Of $40M Fatal Jeep Fire Award

    The Georgia State Supreme Court upheld a $40 million award to the family of a boy who died in 2012 when riding in a 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee after the car was rear-ended and burst into flames, finding the salary and benefits of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ CEO were admissible evidence.

  • March 15, 2018

    Auto Seller Seeks Full 11th Circ. Review Of Bias Suit

    An auto sales company whose victory over an employee’s discrimination suit was reversed by an Eleventh Circuit panel asked the full appeals court to reinstate its win on Wednesday, saying the decision to reinstate the case was based on bad evidence and an invalid argument.

  • March 15, 2018

    Sanden's $2.4M Deal With Auto Dealers Gets Judge's 1st OK

    A Michigan federal judge on Thursday granted preliminary approval to auto equipment maker Sanden's $2.4 million settlement with a proposed class of auto dealers who have accused the company of conspiring with other manufacturers to fix prices for vehicle air conditioning systems.

  • March 15, 2018

    BNSF Can't Derail Ruling In Wash. Tribe's Right-Of-Way Suit

    A Washington federal judge Thursday rejected BNSF Railway Co.’s attempt to call into question a tribe's ownership of land on which a disputed railroad runs after losing its argument that the latter’s claims that its increased crude oil shipments breach a right-of-way easement agreement are preempted.

  • March 15, 2018

    Car Rental Tax Constitutional, Ariz. Appeals Court Says

    A car rental tax that helped fund the construction of top-tier sports stadiums in Arizona has been ruled legal under both the Arizona and U.S. constitutions by the Arizona Court of Appeals, generally overturning an Arizona Tax Court ruling.

  • March 15, 2018

    4 Things To Watch In FAA Reauthorization Talks

    With the Federal Aviation Administration’s current authorization expiring at the end of the month, Congress will likely pass a short-term extension to buy time to negotiate other top-flight issues concerning consumer protection, drone oversight and funding for airport upgrades, experts say.

  • March 15, 2018

    Ford Wins DQ Of Calif. Judge In Engine Defect Suit

    Ford Motor Co. won the disqualification of the California Superior Court judge that had been about to oversee a trial in a suit over an alleged F-350 diesel engine defect when a state appeals court ruled Wednesday the company hadn’t kicked off its challenge too late.

Expert Analysis

  • Changes To Rule 23 Are Coming, Are You Prepared?

    Niki Mendoza

    Proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure Rule 23, which governs class actions, are set to take effect on Dec. 1, 2018, pending approval. The amendments would significantly alter class action litigation procedure from notice to settlement, says Niki Mendoza of Garden City Group LLC.

  • How To Negotiate Wireless Infrastructure Agreements

    Walt Sapronov

    When negotiating shared wireless infrastructure contracts in large venues, sponsors should pay close attention to technology specifications, upgrades and interference protection, say Walt Sapronov and Kenneth Klatt of Sapronov and Associates PC.

  • Lawyering A La Carte: Unbundled Dispute Resolution Services

    David Wallace

    There's no reason for limiting unbundled legal services to family law or even pro se litigants. Wider adoption, especially by litigators, presents an opportunity to correct law's distribution and pricing problem, to make justice practically available to all, and to dethrone litigation as the "sport of kings," says New York-based trial lawyer David Wallace.

  • Aviation Update: Air Traffic Control Privatization Stalls

    Alan Hoffman

    Last month saw the end of a congressional effort to privatize the nation’s air traffic control system. The initiative was opposed by groups who saw it as a ploy to hand air traffic control to the airlines. But given its support from the airline industry and the Trump administration, privatization will likely resurface, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and private pilot.

  • You’re Perfect, Now Change: Perfectionism Hurts Lawyers

    Peter Norman

    Like medical professionals, lawyers often resist policies to reduce errors due to the culture of perfectionism that permeates the industry. Autonomy is key to the legal professional's prestige and the outward demonstration of competence is key to maintaining autonomy, says Peter Norman of Winnieware LLC.

  • Will UN Electric Vehicle Regs Live Up To Billing?

    Anurag Maheshwary

    Aspiring to close the gaps between differences in American, European and Chinese approaches to regulating electric vehicle safety, the United Nations recently completed development of a Global Technical Regulation. Anurag Maheshwary, an attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice, reviews the notable features of the GTR and explores its impact on improving safety compared to existing regulations.

  • Opinion

    Grassley, Feinstein Debate Judicial Vetting, Obstruction

    Sen. Chuck Grassley

    It is undisputed that in his first year in office President Trump was able to confirm a significant number of judges to the federal bench. How it happened — and whether it's a good thing — are debated here by Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.

  • FERC Has Options If Court Pulls Pipeline Certificates

    Randall Rich

    The D.C. Circuit recently denied petitions for rehearing filed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and a group of pipeline companies, and might soon vacate FERC’s orders authorizing the Florida Southeast Connection pipelines. FERC and the pipeline operators face the question of how and whether the pipelines could keep operating without certificates, says Randall Rich of Pierce Atwood LLP.

  • Congressional Forecast: March

    Layth Elhassani

    Upcoming congressional action for the duration of March appears likely to resolve the budget and appropriations impasse of the last several months, after U.S. House and Senate leaders and the White House were able to reach an agreement last month on topline spending numbers for fiscal year 2018, say Layth Elhassani and Kaitlyn McClure of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • 10 Tips For Working With IT To Preserve Data

    John Tredennick

    Increasingly, when courts impose a “legal hold” they require legal supervision of the preservation process, meaning lawyers must rely heavily on information technology professionals to execute the mechanics. John Tredennick of Catalyst Repository Systems and Alon Israely of TotalDiscovery offer insights on how legal and IT can work together to make the process more efficient and fulfill the company’s legal obligations.