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Transportation

  • October 4, 2018

    Car Data Co. Wants Discovery Quashed In Antitrust MDL

    A vehicle information services company has urged an Illinois federal judge to shut down a discovery request from a digital registration company in antitrust multidistrict litigation, saying any discovery should wait until its motion to dismiss is resolved.

  • October 3, 2018

    Fees Too Low In $18M Plane Crash Suit Deal, Court Says

    A California appellate panel on Tuesday published an opinion holding that a trial judge’s decision to grant just 10 percent attorneys' fees in an $18.1 million settlement of a wrongful death suit over a plane crash was too low and unreasonable given a much higher contingency fee agreement.

  • October 3, 2018

    Pa. High Court To Review Squatter's Rights Dispute

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to review a decision that only the state, not a city, can claim immunity from squatter's rights in a dispute between the city of Philadelphia and a resident who claims a right to unused land near his home.

  • October 3, 2018

    VW Must Face Claims Of Drivers Who Sold Cars Pre-Scandal

    A California federal judge Wednesday largely rejected bids by Volkswagen AG and electronics engineering firm Robert Bosch LLC to dismiss putative class claims from former owners who sold their affected diesel vehicles before news of an emissions-cheating scandal broke, saying the drivers alleged a sufficiently concrete injury.

  • October 3, 2018

    Emissions Crackdown Stretches To Small Auto Parts Makers

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency’s criminal prosecutions of small businesses that make aftermarket auto components that increase vehicles’ pollution are a show of force that experts say clearly indicates it’s not just giants like Volkswagen that need to be careful about their products’ effects on air quality.

  • October 3, 2018

    American Airlines Ducks Class Action Over Late Check-Ins

    An Illinois federal judge has struck down class action allegations over American Airlines’ alleged unwritten policy of booting passengers who check in too close to their departure time, saying the passengers’ circumstances are too personal to be considered as a group.

  • October 3, 2018

    Supreme Court Hears Trucker's Take On Arbitration Limits

    The U.S. Supreme Court heard a truck driver's arguments Wednesday that Congress had the foresight in the 1920s to prohibit commerce employers such as New Prime Inc. from forcing independent contractors, like all other cross-border workers, into arbitration.

  • October 3, 2018

    US Scraps Decades-Old Iran Treaty After ICJ Sanctions Order

    Hours after the International Court of Justice ordered the U.S. on Wednesday to lift sanctions affecting the trade of humanitarian items and civil aviation-related goods to Iran, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that the U.S. would be terminating an underlying decades-old treaty with the Middle Eastern nation.

  • October 3, 2018

    Things To Watch In The New FAA Reauthorization

    Congress’ swift passage of a five-year reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration advances meaningful infrastructure investment, embraces aviation safety reforms and expands the government’s playbook for integrating drones, industry observers say. Here are a few notable provisions in the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

  • October 3, 2018

    Full 3rd Circ. To Rehear Flyer's TSA Screener Abuse Suit

    The Third Circuit said Wednesday the entire court will hold a rehearing to reconsider its previous decision finding Transportation Security Administration airport screeners to be immune to civil suits over alleged traveler abuse.

  • October 3, 2018

    6th Circ. Won't Rehear Rail Co.'s Tax Discrimination Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Wednesday denied a railroad carrier's request for an en banc rehearing in a dispute over whether Tennessee's diesel fuel sales and use tax on railroad carriers is discriminatory, saying all issues raised had been previously considered.

  • October 3, 2018

    Airline Must Face Passenger's 'Severe Turbulence' Injury Suit

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday found that an Iberia airline passenger's suit claiming injuries sustained from severe turbulence while onboard a flight from Madrid to Milan can proceed under a multilateral treaty that governs airline liability for passenger injury and death.

  • October 3, 2018

    Royal Caribbean Faces 6-Figure Verdict For Ice-Skating Injury

    A Florida federal jury entered a nearly $700,000 verdict Tuesday in a negligence suit brought against Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. by a passenger who broke his ankle while ice-skating aboard one of its ships.

  • October 3, 2018

    Trump Taps DOE Policy Head For FERC Commissioner Slot

    President Donald Trump announced Wednesday his intention to nominate the executive director of the office of policy at the U.S. Department of Energy as a member of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

  • October 3, 2018

    Car Dealer Data Co. Settles With Dealerships In Antitrust Case

    The Reynolds and Reynolds Co. has reached a settlement agreement with a group of car dealerships over their claims in multidistrict litigation accusing the company of working with rival CDK Global LLC to monopolize the car dealership data market.

  • October 3, 2018

    Eagle Ford Shale Cos. Get County's Road Damage Suit Axed

    A Texas appellate court on Wednesday sided with 21 oil and gas companies operating in the Eagle Ford Shale and dismissed them from a lawsuit filed by Dimmit County trying to hold the companies responsible for major road damage in the rural community.

  • October 3, 2018

    NYC DOE Denied $2.9M Fee Award After ERISA Win

    A New York federal judge denied the New York City Department of Education's request for $2.9 million in attorneys' fees after defeating a transit union pension fund's suit alleging that the agency owed it more than $100 million, ruling that fees weren't warranted under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

  • October 3, 2018

    British Automaker Aston Martin Snags £1.1B From IPO

    Luxury automaker Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd. on Wednesday priced its initial public offering below the midpoint of its range, setting its share price at £19 ($24.60), to bring in £1.08 billion for the British car company.

  • October 3, 2018

    Mobile Travel App Locks In $100M In Series D Financing

    Mobile travel application Hopper said Wednesday that it has closed its last funding round with $100 million in contributions led by OMERS Ventures that will be used to expand beyond the U.S. market and develop its artificial intelligence business.

  • October 3, 2018

    Kirkland Steers GM In $2.75B Honda Autonomous Vehicle Deal

    General Motors Corp. on Wednesday said Honda Motor Co. will make a $2.75 billion investment in the company’s efforts to roll out autonomous vehicle technologies on a larger scale, with Kirkland & Ellis LLP guiding the U.S. automaker.

Expert Analysis

  • What Cos. Must Know About The Return Of Iran Sanctions

    F. Amanda DeBusk

    President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Aug. 6 formally re-imposing certain sanctions with respect to Iran. Given the administration’s rapidly shifting approach to international trade and national security issues, businesses should plan for the worst — while continuing to advocate for a more pragmatic approach, say attorneys with Dechert LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • Looking Forward To Oral Argument In BNSF V. Loos

    Christopher Collier

    In the coming term, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument in BNSF Railway v. Michael Loos and decide whether a railroad employer is required to withhold employment tax from work-related personal injury awards. The ruling will affect thousands of claims made by railway workers each year, say Christopher Collier and Michael Arndt at Hawkins Parnell Thackston & Young LLP.

  • Blockchains: A Better Tool For Supply Chain Management

    James Ton-that

    Although commonly associated with cryptocurrencies, blockchain technology can also be implemented to modernize international supply chains, which currently suffer from voluminous documentary requirements, layers of middlemen and immense regulation, say James Ton-that and Ravi Soopramanien of Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.

  • Sidewalks: The Next Mobility Frontier

    Michele Satterlund

    Sidewalks are an increasingly integral part of how people and goods are transported. While some jurisdictions are banning certain technologies from their sidewalks, others are recognizing the importance of expanding mobility options, says Michele Satterlund, an attorney with McGuireWoods LLP and lobbyist with McGuireWoods Consulting.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: How To Play The Long Game

    Arun Subramanian

    One of us was a clerk when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg read her Ledbetter dissent from the bench, inviting Congress to act, and the other clerked a few years later, when RBG's prominently displayed copy of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act served as a daily reminder that dissents are not just for show, say Arun Subramanian and Mark Musico of Susman Godfrey LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: In Pursuit Of Precision

    Trevor Morrison

    As clerks for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we learned early on that, when preparing a memorandum or draft opinion, it was essential to present any opposing argument in its strongest possible light. There is a lesson here for today's public debates, says Trevor Morrison, dean of NYU Law School.

  • NY Offshore Wind Plan Spotlights Jones Act Compliance

    Charlie Papavizas

    Last month, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced an ambitious offshore wind power plan. But to succeed, the plan must comply with the many restrictions of the Jones Act, a federal law that reserves U.S. domestic maritime trade to U.S.-built vessels owned and operated by Americans, says Charlie Papavizas of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: My RBG Guide To Judging

    Goodwin Liu

    I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the days of RBG bobbleheads and “You Can’t Spell Truth Without Ruth” T-shirts. I had no idea I would become a judge, and I feel lucky every day that I had the chance to learn from her, says California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.