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A federal judge said the Federal Trade Commission did not bring the "type of strong proof" that would justify its $4 billion case against DirecTV. (AP)

DirecTV Ducks Most Of FTC’s $4B False Ad Case

A California federal judge culled most of the Federal Trade Commission's $4 billion false advertising suit against DirecTV on Thursday, ruling that the agency didn't have evidence strong enough to meet the "extraordinary ambition" of showing that over 40,000 ads deceived consumers.

  • Equitable Mootness Applies In Ch. 9 Cases, 11th Circ. Says

    The Eleventh Circuit handed a group of Jefferson County, Alabama, sewer ratepayers a loss Thursday when it ruled that equitable mootness applies to Chapter 9 bankruptcy and extinguished their appeal of a bankruptcy confirmation plan for the county.

  • Rakoff Shaves Objector Atty's Fee Bid In $3B Petrobras Deal

    U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff has ruled that the Center for Class Action Fairness can have just a small fraction of the nearly $200,000 in attorneys' fees requested for it by its client, an objector to the $3 billion class action settlement resolving securities fraud claims against Brazilian oil giant Petrobras.

  • Trump Taps Sidley Austin Partner For San Francisco US Atty

     A partner at Sidley Austin LLP will be nominated as U.S. attorney in San Francisco, the White House announced Thursday, as it also revealed nominees for spots in Florida, Illinois and North Dakota.

  • Electronics Giants Agree To Settle Battery MDL For $43.5M

    Indirect purchasers who allege a slew of battery makers engaged in price-fixing lithium ion batteries told a California federal court on Wednesday that Samsung SDI Co. Ltd., NEC Tokin Corp. and Toshiba Corp. have agreed to settle their multidistrict litigation claims for a total of $43.5 million.

  • DEA To Cut Drugmaker Production Of Most-Abused Opioids

    The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Thursday moved to curtail drugmaker production of the most commonly abused prescription opioids, saying the cut will inhibit illicit sales of narcotic painkillers.

  • Nat'l Archives Pans Committee's Release Of Kavanaugh Docs

    The National Archives, which has found itself in the middle of a bitter struggle over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s documents from his Bush White House service, on Wednesday sought to put some distance between its review process and that of the current Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • Ex-BP Economist Gets Prison In Bitcoin Extortion Plot

    A former BP America Inc. economist who pled guilty to attempting to extort the company out of more than $300,000 by demanding bitcoin payment in exchange for not releasing classified documents was sentenced on Thursday by a federal judge in Houston to 27 months in prison.

  • Fed. Circ. Reverses Part Of $7.3M Apple Patent Verdict

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday upended a jury verdict that required Apple Inc. to pay $7.3 million to Core Wireless Licensing SARL, which claimed iPads and iPhones infringed two of its patents covering wireless communications technology.

  • Senate Confirms 2 Trump Nominees To 4th Circ.

    The Senate Thursday voted to confirm a pair of Trump nominees to serve on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, giving favorable votes to federal Judge A. Marvin Quattlebaum and prosecutor Jay Richardson, both of South Carolina.

  • 'Indefensible' Fees Request Slashed In ACA Birth Control Row

    In a sternly worded opinion, an Oklahoma federal judge rejected a request for $3.1 million in attorneys' fees from lawyers representing a group of Catholic institutions that sued over Affordable Care Act rules concerning birth control, ruling that the request was "indefensible" and reducing it by more than 75 percent.

  • Mayer Brown Partner's Brother-In-Law Charged With Murder

    Mayer Brown LLP appellate practice leader Stephen Shapiro's brother-in-law had been receiving financial assistance from Shapiro's wife Joan for several months and was told "she would no longer just give him money" in the days before he fatally shot Shapiro and tried to kill her, a state prosecutor told an Illinois state court judge Thursday.

  • State Dept. Must Do New Study For New Keystone XL Route

    A Montana federal judge Wednesday ordered the U.S. Department of State to supplement an environmental review it submitted for an old version of the Keystone XL pipeline’s planned route through Nebraska, while declining to vacate the permit of approval issued by President Donald Trump.