White Collar

  • November 13, 2019

    'Common Thief' Gets Longest 'Varsity Blues' Sentence Yet

    A Boston federal judge blasted a parent who admitted to paying $450,000 to have his children falsely designated as athletic recruits, calling him a "common thief" before sentencing him Wednesday to six months in prison, the longest sentence to date in the “Varsity Blues” college admissions scandal.

  • November 13, 2019

    Pa. Woman Cops To Multimillion-Dollar Medicaid Fraud Plot

    A Pennsylvania home health care worker pled guilty to conspiring to defraud Pennsylvania's Medicaid program, marking the latest development in a federal investigation involving millions of dollars and at least 15 other alleged conspirators, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • November 13, 2019

    Miami Boutique Mark Migdal Adds 2 Experienced Litigators

    Miami-based Mark Migdal & Hayden has added a pair of new partners, who said they were attracted by the litigation boutique's progressive culture and entrepreneurial approach as well as its track record of taking on big cases and prominent clients.

  • November 13, 2019

    Jurors Set To Determine Trump Pal Roger Stone's Fate

    A 12-member jury will begin deliberations Thursday in former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone's criminal trial after prosecutors made their final pitch Wednesday afternoon.

  • November 13, 2019

    Feds Charge 6 In Alleged $27M NJ Money Laundering Ring

    A half-dozen New Jersey residents were slapped with criminal charges on Wednesday alleging they laundered about $27 million worth of proceeds from illegal drug sales through cashier’s checks purchased at area banks.

  • November 13, 2019

    Seyfarth Can Escape Tax Shelter RICO Suit, 7th Circ. Says

    An insurance executive failed to make a racketeering case against Seyfarth Shaw LLP over bad tax shelter advice, the Seventh Circuit has ruled in partly affirming a lower court's dismissal of the suit because the executive didn’t prove ongoing fraud.

  • November 13, 2019

    SEC Urges 11th Circ. To Not Touch Its Win In $5M Fraud Row

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has urged the Eleventh Circuit not to overturn its win in a Georgia federal court case where an Alabama attorney was ordered to pay nearly $5 million for purportedly defrauding former NBA star Charles Barkley and other investors out of millions of dollars.

  • November 13, 2019

    Texas Judge Indicted For Wire Fraud Suspended Without Pay

    A state district court judge in Houston was suspended Tuesday without pay by the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, four days after pleading not guilty to federal charges she used campaign funds for personal expenses.

  • November 13, 2019

    Esformes, Feds At Odds On Frozen Assets To Cover Legal Bill

    The judge overseeing the health care fraud case against convicted nursing home mogul Philip Esformes declined Wednesday to rule on his request to access frozen assets to cover millions of dollars in unpaid legal bills but set the stage for a colleague to address a brewing battle with the government over the issue.

  • November 13, 2019

    5th Circ. Won't Rehear $298M Verdict Against Mortgage Cos.

    The Fifth Circuit declined to revisit a $298 million judgment arising from federal loan insurance fraud during the mortgage crisis, after two mortgage loan companies claimed the original appeals panel twisted a causation standard.

  • November 13, 2019

    'Sham' UN Org Exec Pleads Not Guilty To Crypto Coin Fraud

    The president of a sports group that prosecutors called a "sham" United Nations affiliate pled not guilty in Manhattan federal court on Wednesday to charges that he defrauded investors with a phony cryptocurrency initial coin offering.

  • November 13, 2019

    Ex-Pa. Construction Co. Controller Admits To Stealing $8.7M

    The former controller of a Pittsburgh-area construction firm pled guilty Wednesday to wire fraud and filing false tax returns after prosecutors said she stole more than $8.7 million from her employers over nearly a decade.

  • November 13, 2019

    Reality TV Real Estate Agent Can't End Students' Fraud Suit

    A real estate investor made famous by A&E’s television series "Flip This House" waited too long to try to use a Texas free speech law to end a lawsuit by 423 disgruntled students alleging his seminars and investment lessons were a fraud, a Texas appellate court ruled Wednesday.

  • November 13, 2019

    Genova Burns Dragged Into Suit Against Disbarred NJ Pol

    Genova Burns LLC must face legal malpractice claims over its allegedly negligent supervision of a convicted ex-mayor and disbarred attorney after his onetime running mate convinced a New Jersey state judge Wednesday to let him pull the firm into a suit over the disgraced politician's handling of campaign finance reports.

  • November 13, 2019

    'Varsity Blues' Test Admin Cops To Taking $200K In Bribes

    A former test administrator who prosecutors say reeled in nearly $200,000 in bribes for allowing students to cheat on standardized tests as part of the “Varsity Blues” college admissions case pled guilty Wednesday in Massachusetts federal court.

  • November 12, 2019

    Alsup 'Dumbfounded' By Delay In Ex-Twitter Worker Spy Case

    U.S. District Judge William Alsup held off Tuesday on deciding whether to release a former Twitter employee charged with using his backdoor access to the social media site to steal private information from critics of Saudi Arabia's regime, saying he's "dumbfounded" that prosecutors haven't been able to transfer him from Seattle.

  • November 12, 2019

    Ex-StarKist Exec Admits Price-Fix In Ex-Bumble Bee CEO Trial

    A former StarKist executive testified Tuesday in the criminal price-fixing trial of former Bumble Bee CEO Christopher Lischewski, highlighting for a California federal jury the tuna industry leadership’s close relationships and how he worked with executives at Bumble Bee and Chicken of the Sea to fix prices.

  • November 12, 2019

    Manafort's 'Evil' Ex-Son-In-Law Gets 9 Years For Fraud

    Paul Manafort’s former son-in-law, who "revels in cheating others," was sentenced to more than nine years in prison for scamming investors out of $6.7 million while out on bond after copping to another real estate fraud, the U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday.

  • November 12, 2019

    Feds Fight Texas Doc's New Trial Bid In $40M Kickback Row

    A Texas surgeon convicted for his role in a $40 million kickback scheme to steer patients to a Dallas hospital came up short in his bid for a new trial, prosecutors told a Texas federal judge, saying he can’t show how the anti-kickback statute was unconstitutionally vague.

  • November 12, 2019

    Ex-Phillips 66 Scientist Cops To Stealing Trade Secret

    A Chinese national who worked as a scientist for petroleum giant Phillips 66 pled guilty Tuesday to stealing a trade secret from his former employer related to the manufacture of a product worth more than $1 billion, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • November 12, 2019

    US Reveals Money Laundering Cases Against 2 Guatemalans

    Federal officials on Tuesday announced the arrest of the director of a Guatemalan national bank for alleged money laundering, as well as the unsealing of a money laundering case that resulted in an ex-presidential candidate for the Central American country being sentenced to more than four years in prison.

  • November 12, 2019

    NY Judge Makes Criminal Referral After Axing Woori Bank Suit

    A New York federal judge has reached out to the Manhattan U.S. attorney in connection with a now-dismissed lawsuit that alleged a major South Korean bank stole €8 billion ($8.73 billion), flagging what he said might have been fraud and other related misconduct by the bank's accuser.

  • November 12, 2019

    Feds Want Lawmaker's Atty DQ'd In Campaign Finance Case

    A law firm should be disqualified from representing U.S. Rep. Duncan D. Hunter in litigation over his alleged misuse of campaign contributions on vacations, extramarital affairs and other expenses, as the firm has also counseled witnesses in the case, the federal government has argued.

  • November 12, 2019

    Ind. Judges Suspended After Drunken White Castle Brawl

    The Indiana Supreme Court on Tuesday suspended three judges involved in a drunken fight and shooting outside an Indianapolis White Castle earlier this year, noting in the decision that the judges' actions "were not merely embarrassing on a personal level; they discredited the entire Indiana judiciary."

  • November 12, 2019

    Jones Day Picks Up Ex-SDNY Fraud Unit Co-Chief In NY

    The former co-chief of the Civil Frauds Unit for the Southern District of New York is joining Jones Day as a partner in its health care and life sciences practice in the Empire State, the firm announced Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Courts Keep Rejecting Litigation Funding Discovery Campaign

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    As shown by recent case law, including a New Jersey federal court holding last month in Valsartan Products Liability Litigation, there is no "shifting tide" in favor of disclosing litigation funding arrangements, say Matthew Harrison and Stephanie Southwick of Bentham IMF.

  • How Emotionally Intelligent AI Could Assist With E-Discovery

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    While artificial intelligence has already revolutionized the e-discovery field, the development of emotionally intelligent AI promises to explore data in an even more nuanced and human way, thereby further reducing the burden on legal teams, say Lisa Prowse and Brian Schrader at e-discovery services provider BIA.

  • FinCEN 'Travel Rule' Update Sets Challenges For Crypto Cos.

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    It is unclear how the virtual currency sector will find a practical way to comply with the recent expansion of the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network regulation known as the travel rule, but any solution is likely to have both unintended consequences and unintended benefits, say attorneys with King & Spalding.

  • Sports Gambling Compliance: Big Money Worth The Wager

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    As America teeters on the edge of a sports betting revolution, both prudent betting operators and the banks they use should roll out tailored compliance programs that effectively manage reputational, regulatory and business risks to avoid civil or criminal penalties, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • Preventable Risks Your Law Firm May Be Overlooking

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    Although most lawyers are well-prepared to defend or justify the value of an insurance claim for clients, often law firms have not clearly identified their own potential liabilities, planned for adequate insurance or established prudent internal risk management practices, says Victor Sordillo at Sompo International.

  • 6 Ethics Tips For Attorneys Making Lateral Transfers

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    With lateral transfers between law firms on the rise, it is more important than ever for partners to understand the steps they must take to adhere to ethics rules and other requirements when making a transition, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Giuliani Faces 4 Privilege Hurdles In Ukraine Call Probe

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    Assuming Rudy Giuliani intends to continue his assertion of attorney-client privilege in response to a House intelligence committee's subpoena concerning communications with Ukrainian officials on behalf of President Donald Trump, he has a difficult road ahead, says Tyler Maulsby at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • DOJ's Qui Tam Approach Seems To Be Shifting

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    In the past, when a whistleblower brought a complaint to the government, it was considered significant if the U.S. Department of Justice declined to intervene. In this short video, David Tolley and BJ Trach of Latham discuss how things have changed in recent years.

  • Opinion

    President’s Private Business Interests Are Not Above The Law

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    President Donald Trump's New York federal court case against the Manhattan district attorney's subpoena of the president's tax returns insists that his private businesses and business associates are immune from state criminal investigation, but this immunity does not appear in the Constitution or any statute or treaty, say Arthur Middlemiss and Marc Scholl at Lewis Baach.

  • What To Look For In White Collar Cases This High Court Term

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    Several upcoming U.S. Supreme Court decisions — involving such varied issues as criminal procedure, statutory interpretation and public corruption — may see traditional liberal-conservative fault lines fall by the wayside and may have a notable impact on white collar criminal defense practice, say Harry Sandick and Jacob Newman of Patterson Belknap.

  • Consider The Power Of Tactical Empathy

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    By employing tactical empathy techniques to understand the interests behind the positions taken by others, attorneys can gain the upper hand in deal negotiations and litigation while still promoting and preserving long-term relationships with opponents, judges and others, say Shermin Kruse of TEDxYouth@Wrigleyville and Ursula Taylor of Strategic Health.

  • The Problem — And Opportunity — Of Implicit Bias In The Bar

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    Law firms are beginning to recognize implicit bias as a problem. But too few recognize that it is also an opportunity to broaden our thinking and become better legal problem solvers, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Thapar Reviews Gorsuch's 'A Republic'

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's new book "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" offers hope for our constitutional system through stories of American greatness, and sheds much-needed light on originalism for skeptics, says Sixth Circuit Judge Amul Thapar.

  • 2 Trends In DOJ Health Care Enforcement

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    As the health care industry continues to evolve, so do the government's enforcement priorities. In this brief video, David Tolley and BJ Trach of Latham discuss two key areas of focus for the U.S. Department of Justice: the opioid crisis, and patient support and assistance programs.

  • Opinion

    True Wellness Requires A Deeper Look At Atty Profession

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    While I applaud all of the law firms that have signed the American Bar Association's campaign to improve attorney well-being, to achieve a truly holistic solution we must ask difficult questions about what we do, how we do it and the expectations we have set for ourselves and our clients, says Edward Shapiro at Much Shelist.

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