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White Collar

  • September 21, 2018

    Ex-Chevron Oil Trader Gets Probation For Tax Fraud

    A former oil trader for Chevron facing 20 years in prison for his role in an alleged kickback scheme until making a deal with prosecutors was sentenced by a federal judge in Houston on Friday to three years of probation.

  • September 21, 2018

    Online Fundraisers Fraught With Criminal, Civil Risks

    Civil litigation, potential criminal charges and uncertain access for beneficiaries are among the risks of the relatively new concept known as crowdfunding, as highlighted by the the viral story chronicling the legal battle between a homeless veteran and a New Jersey couple. Here are three things attorneys should tell their clients about do-it-yourself fundraisers.

  • September 21, 2018

    Ex-Platinum Partners Exec Dies Ahead Of $1B Fraud Trial

    Former Platinum Partners honcho Uri Landesman, charged for his role in a purported $1 billion securities fraud scheme, died, his lawyer said Friday, ahead of a January trial of hedge fund executives accused of duping bondholders of defunct offshore driller Black Elk.

  • September 21, 2018

    Former Rite Aid Ad Exec To Cop To $5.7M Kickback Scheme

    A former vice president for advertising at Rite Aid Inc. and one of the owners of an Atlanta-based marketing business have agreed to plead guilty to a $5.7 million kickback scheme, while the marketing business's co-owner told Law360 on Friday he will fight related charges.

  • September 21, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a London no dealing desk sue Merrill Lynch for breach of fiduciary duty, more competition claims against Visa and MasterCard and a German shipper bring a suit against Axa and other insurers.

  • September 21, 2018

    Sens. Urge DOJ Watchdog To Probe FBI HQ Project

    A group of Democratic senators has urged a U.S. Department of Justice watchdog to look into the “abrupt” decision to abandon a plan to relocate FBI headquarters, particularly any influence the White House may have had, according to an announcement Friday.

  • September 21, 2018

    Ex-Cocoa Trading Co. Exec Gets 3 Months For $352M Fraud

    U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff on Friday hit a former Transmar Commodity Group Ltd. finance executive with a three-month sentence for his role in a $352 million fraud that bankrupted the cocoa trader and damaged banks, crediting his effort to cooperate but saying the size of the caper required a prison term.

  • September 21, 2018

    Co. Still Liable If Worker Lies That Taxes Paid: 8th Circ.

    A company misled by an errant employee into thinking he paid its taxes is still liable for interest and penalties when he didn’t, the Eighth Circuit said in an opinion Friday upholding a lower-court dismissal.

  • September 21, 2018

    Armstrong Doping Whistleblower Appeals Denial of Damages

    The whistleblower who started a successful False Claims Act suit against cyclist Lance Armstrong's former team said Friday he will appeal the D.C. district court’s decision to deny him $32 million in damages for his part in exposing the alleged fraud.

  • September 21, 2018

    Sentencing Delay In $1.6M Pump-And-Dump Frustrates Judge

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Friday vented her frustration as a man who copped to arranging a $1.6 million pump-and-dump scheme told her hours before he was set to be sentenced that he would not be flying up to Boston for the hearing because he wants to stay in Florida to be with his dying father.

  • September 21, 2018

    Pa. Judge Defends Axing Ex-DA's Suit Against Cosby Accuser

    A trial judge is urging a Pennsylvania appeals court to uphold her ruling axing claims from a former Montgomery County district attorney alleging that Andrea Constand, whom comedian Bill Cosby was convicted for sexually assaulting in April, tanked his bid to regain public office by targeting him with a "bogus" defamation lawsuit.

  • September 21, 2018

    Houston Atty Charged In $18M Offshore Tax Evasion Scheme

    A Houston attorney has been indicted in a Texas federal court on charges of conspiracy and tax evasion for his role in a scheme to repatriate more than $18 million in untaxed earnings from the Isle of Man, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • September 21, 2018

    Ex-SFO Prosecutor Joins Cohen & Gresser’s London Office

    International law firm Cohen & Gresser LLP has enticed a former U.K. Serious Fraud Office prosecutor to join its white-collar defense group in its London offices.

  • September 21, 2018

    Ex-Deutsche Bank Euribor Trader Held In Italy, SFO Says

    A former Deutsche Bank trader who was allegedly involved in manipulating a key European interest rate benchmark has been arrested in Italy and could be extradited to the U.K., the Serious Fraud Office revealed on Friday.

  • September 20, 2018

    2nd Circuit Balks At Bid To Lower No-Fault Fraud Sentence

    The Second Circuit on Thursday expressed reluctance to force a federal judge in Brooklyn to rethink a prison sentence that was longer than prosecutors originally recommended for a man who admitted his role in a no-fault insurance scheme after cooperating with prosecutors to bring in his alleged co-conspirators.

  • September 20, 2018

    NY Times Sues For FCC's Russia-Linked Net Neutrality Docs

    The New York Times hit the Federal Communications Commission with a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit Thursday in New York federal court accusing the FCC of lobbing “a series of roadblocks” as the newspaper seeks records on potential Russian interference in the rulemaking process that repealed net neutrality.

  • September 20, 2018

    Former SEC, FINRA Official Returns To King & Spalding

    King & Spalding LLP announced this week that a former partner will be returning to its Washington, D.C., office to rejoin the firm’s special matters and government investigations team, pulling from his near-decade of experience at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and recent years with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

  • September 20, 2018

    Houston Pill Mill Doc, Clinic Chief Each Get 35 Years In Prison

    A Houston doctor and the owner of the pain management clinic where she worked were each sentenced to 35 years in prison by a federal judge in Texas on Thursday for their roles in running what prosecutors called the “most prolific hydrocodone pill mill in Houston.”

  • September 20, 2018

    Chicago Alderman Sets Date To Plead To Bribery Charges

    A Chicago alderman charged with accepting bribes and using a ward bank account as a personal piggy bank plans to plead guilty at the end of November, according to a judge’s order entered Thursday.

  • September 20, 2018

    Creek Reservation Survived Okla. Statehood, Justices Told

    A Muscogee (Creek) Nation citizen has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold a Tenth Circuit decision nixing his murder conviction in state court on the grounds that the killing took place within the tribe’s reservation boundaries, saying the reservation wasn’t eliminated even when Oklahoma became a state.

Expert Analysis

  • In Calif., Questions Remain On Law Firm Conflict Waivers

    Richard Rosensweig

    In Sheppard Mullin v. J-M Manufacturing Co., the California Supreme Court ruled last month that a law firm's failure to disclose a known conflict with another current client did not categorically disentitle the firm from recovering fees. But the court didn’t provide hoped-for guidance on how to write an enforceable advance conflict waiver, says Richard Rosensweig of Goulston & Storrs PC.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Faegre Client Development Chief Melanie Green

    Melanie Green

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Melanie Green, chief client development officer at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • DOJ Is Getting Creative, And Aggressive, On Opioids

    Michael Blume

    Last month, the U.S. Department of Justice obtained court orders barring two Ohio doctors from selling controlled substances. The statutory provisions it used are broadly worded, and if past is prologue, the DOJ could be getting ready to demand big changes from any entity that is a part of the opioid supply chain, say Michael Blume and Todd Halpern of Venable LLP.

  • Structuring Investigations In Light Of UK Privilege Case

    Mark Beeley

    The English Court of Appeal's much-anticipated decision in Eurasian Natural Resources Corporation means that companies will continue to face difficulties in obtaining the information they need to investigate suspected wrongdoing, without losing the benefit of legal advice privilege under English law, say Mark Beeley and Rebecca Dipple of Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.

  • Guest Feature

    Tom Mesereau Talks MJ, Cosby, Unconventional Choices

    Randy Maniloff

    Tom Mesereau may be recently recognizable as one of the attorneys who defended Bill Cosby, but his biggest claim to fame is successfully defending Michael Jackson in 2005. On the eve of what would have been the King of Pop’s 60th birthday, Randy Maniloff, of White and Williams LLP, spoke to Mesereau about his unconventional path to a remarkable career.

  • Can Kavanaugh Be Impeached For Statements To Congress?

    Barbara Radnofsky

    Sitting U.S. senators and a former congressional staffer have accused Judge Brett Kavanaugh of misconduct, including being untruthful in his nomination and confirmation processes for both the D.C. Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court. Could this subject him to impeachment? Attorney Barbara Radnofsky explores the question through past precedent.

  • How The Beijing Convention Is Changing Aviation Security

    James Jordan

    The recently enacted Beijing Convention has created a new international legal framework around emerging threats to the safety of civil aviation, including illegal transport of biological, chemical and nuclear material. But it may also expose carriers and their employees to criminal liability if legitimate activities are not carefully managed, says James Jordan of Holman Fenwick Willan LLP.

  • What The Arkema Indictment Means For Chemical Cos.

    Benjamin Patton

    Last month, a Texas grand jury indicted Arkema Inc., its CEO and a plant manager for allowing a release of air contaminants during Hurricane Harvey. The indictment is legally significant because it represents a criminal prosecution for a safety incident that involved no fatalities or catastrophic environmental harm, say Benjamin Patton and Mary Balaster of Reed Smith LLP.

  • When Electronic Records Disappear But Legal Issues Linger

    Donna Fisher

    The legal implications of communication tools that automatically delete messages are surfacing in various types of litigation and investigations. As these tools become more popular, a company must constantly evaluate how to reconcile their use with its duty to preserve evidence, say attorneys with Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Widener's Rod Smolla Talks Free Speech

    Rodney Smolla

    In this new series featuring law school luminaries, Widener University Delaware Law School dean Rodney Smolla discusses teaching philosophies, his interest in First Amendment law, and arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court in Virginia v. Black.