Commercial

  • November 28, 2022

    REIT CEO Wins $3.2M In Case Against Co-Founder

    A New York federal judge ordered the co-founder of a real estate investment trust to pay his former business partner $3.2 million, after a jury found the co-founder liable on most counts in a suit alleging a complex scheme to smear his onetime partner's name.

  • November 28, 2022

    Chubb Unit Can't Get Out Of Winery Blaze Lawsuit

    A California federal judge won't let a Chubb unit avoid a lawsuit by Terlato Wine Group Ltd. seeking coverage for damage from two 2020 Napa County wildfires, finding that the wine company alleged a plausible breach-of-contract claim.

  • November 28, 2022

    Wash. Court Upholds Valuation Of Gas Terminal

    A Washington appeals panel upheld a county tax valuation of a liquefied petroleum gas terminal and wharf Monday, ruling against the terminal owner, which had argued that an appraisal overvalued the property.

  • November 28, 2022

    Trump Org. Rests In NY Tax Fraud Trial Defense

    The Trump Organization companies closed their defense case Monday after attempting to show their longtime accountant failed to properly advise them, but prompted a scolding from the judge for dumping a last-minute tranche of evidence to "see what sticks."

  • November 28, 2022

    Justices Told To Pass Up $92M Racketeering Suit

    A Russian citizen urged the U.S. Supreme Court not to review a Ninth Circuit decision reviving his racketeering claims against a former business partner and a Monaco bank, arguing their alleged attempts to thwart a $92 million judgment constitute a "domestic injury" under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

  • November 28, 2022

    Insurer, NY Steakhouse Settle Fire Coverage Dispute

    A New York federal judge dismissed a suit Monday against the insurer of a burned-down steakhouse after the parties reached a settlement, according to court records.

  • November 28, 2022

    Group Drops Suit Challenging New York Airport Privatization

    A business aviation group has dropped its federal lawsuit against East Hampton, New York, after a state judge last month rejected the village's plan to close and privatize its airport in an effort to restrict flights to the affluent beach town, a notice of dismissal filed Monday shows.

  • November 28, 2022

    Kentucky Oil Operator Cops To 2018 Spill

    A Kentucky oil worker pled guilty on Monday to charges that he negligently allowed 100 barrels of oil to spill into a tributary in 2018, in violation of the Clean Water Act.

  • November 28, 2022

    Full 9th Circ. Urged To Review Calif. Amazon Air Cargo Site

    The state of California and community groups have asked the full Ninth Circuit to review whether the Federal Aviation Administration conducted a proper environmental analysis of a planned Amazon air cargo facility, criticizing a revised court opinion issued last month as inadequate.

  • November 28, 2022

    $109M Construction Loan Set For Seattle Office Project

    A new office building will begin taking shape in the Fremont area of Seattle now that developer evolution projects secured a $109 million construction loan arranged by JLL Capital Markets, according to an announcement on Monday.

  • November 28, 2022

    CareTrust REIT Taps Executive VP, And Its Former GC, As CIO

    CareTrust REIT looked to its own executive vice president and former general counsel when it appointed a new chief investment officer, aiming to tap into his years of health care-focused real estate and legal experience.

  • November 28, 2022

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    In a three-day scramble before Thanksgiving, Delaware's Court of Chancery kicked off new cases involving bitcoin mining, Texas real estate and 2016 election claims; got an earful about Shari E. Redstone's emails and texts from Madison Square Garden; and docketed a request for a proposed $26 million fee award.

  • November 28, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Goldstar, Murrs, Brookfield

    Goldstar Group has reportedly landed $83.7 million for a Maryland multifamily project, Michael and Eva Murr are said to have sold a Miami Beach mansion for $36 million, and a Brookfield Asset Management and Deutsche Pfandbriefbank have reportedly loaned $95 million for a D.C. office property.

  • November 28, 2022

    Gunster Expands Into Naples With Grant Fridkin Merger

    Florida business law firm Gunster announced that it has picked up a Naples boutique that will expand the firm's services to every major market across the Sunshine State and add 12 new attorneys.

  • November 28, 2022

    How Firms Are Getting The Most Out Of Their Pro Bono Work

    From BigLaw to boutiques, each law firm has its own way of integrating pro bono. Some make their pro bono commitment public. Others choose to fly under the radar, forgoing the public relations value pro bono can bring. But overall, the goal is the same: making an impact while developing a strong firm culture.

  • November 28, 2022

    The 2022 Law360 Pulse Social Impact Leaders

    Check out our Social Impact Leaders ranking, analysis and interactive graphics to see which firms stand out for their engagement with social responsibility and commitment to pro bono service.

  • November 25, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen the SFO bring legal action against a Lebanese bank with alleged ties to Hezbollah, a Mancunian Blockbuster-themed cocktail bar sued by the video rental shop for copyright infringement, and IGT hoping for the luck of the draw in a fresh procurement claim against the Gambling Commission. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • November 23, 2022

    11th Circ. Links Travel Firms To Cuba Land Confiscation

    The Eleventh Circuit said in two recent opinions that a group of Americans who owned land confiscated by the Cuban government have standing to sue travel companies such as Carnival Cruise Line and Expedia for "trafficking" in the property.

  • November 23, 2022

    Mich. Court Lets City Groups Weigh In On Gun Range Row

    A Michigan federal judge has allowed two nonprofits representing the interests of hundreds of cities and townships in the state to file an amicus brief opposing a firearm supplier's claim that banning long-distance gun ranges through zoning rules violates Second Amendment rights.

  • November 23, 2022

    EB-5 Investors, Developers Spar Over $28M Settlement Payout

    Chinese investors looking to enforce a $27.5 million EB-5 fraud settlement have signaled their intent to resume asset discovery efforts after claiming a group of real estate developers missed their latest installment deadline, but the developers assert they paid on time and the investors are jumping the gun.

  • November 23, 2022

    Pipeline Health Seeks OK For $92M Chicago Hospital Sale

    Bankrupt hospital operator Pipeline Health System asked a Texas judge to approve a $92 million sale of its Illinois medical facilities, saying the transaction will enable those hospitals to remain in operation.

  • November 23, 2022

    NY Gov. Signs 2-Year Crypto Mining Moratorium

    New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed into law a two-year halt to certain types of cryptocurrency mining as a step to address the practice's impact on climate change.

  • November 23, 2022

    Army Corps Sued Over Tugboat Service On Ohio River

    A construction and asphalt company along the Ohio River is suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Ohio federal court, claiming one of their lessees is operating an unauthorized tugboat fleeting service that is causing the plaintiffs to pay penalty fees and lose contracts with shippers.

  • November 23, 2022

    Jack Nicklaus Barred From Endorsements During NY Case

    Jack Nicklaus can't ink commercial endorsement deals while he litigates the terms of a $145 million intellectual property sale, a Manhattan judge ruled Wednesday after hearing testimony from the legendary golfer.

  • November 23, 2022

    TPLC Sues To Uphold Deal With Investors After Proxy Fight

    One of Texas' biggest landowners, Texas Pacific Land Corporation, has sued an investor group led by New York-based Horizon Kinetics that split with the company at its annual meeting in opposing a move to expand the number of shares of company stock.

Expert Analysis

  • Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • How CRE Buyers' Counsel Should Help Negotiate Sales

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    With commercial real estate deals becoming increasingly difficult for buyers in the current economy, it is crucial for buyers' counsel to understand how to push for specific representations and warranties in purchase and sale agreements without jeopardizing the deal, says Etan Moskovic at Cassin & Cassin.

  • Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • Discovery Strategies For Design And Construction Cases

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Lawsuits involving design and construction defects typically involve extensive written discovery, document production and depositions, so it's crucial for defense counsel to develop a sound plan early on, say Angela Caffey and Heather Beam at Thompson Coe.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • Policyholders Are Not To Blame For Social Inflation

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    As part of the controversial assertion that insurers are facing an unprecedented increase in claims costs due to so-called social inflation, a recent Law360 guest article argued that policyholders contribute to social inflation and are therefore responsible for remedying it, but these accusations are unsupported by empirical data, says Benjamin Tievsky at Pillsbury.

  • State-Led Programs Can Speed Up Brownfield Development

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    Too often, publicly funded brownfields programs are not optimized to achieve redevelopment in the near term, but policymakers can address this problem by directing additional resources toward state-level brownfields programs that offer thoughtfully designed tax incentives and liability protection, says Gerald Pouncey at Morris Manning.

  • Questions To Ask Before Making A Lateral Move As Partner

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    Law firm partners considering lateral moves should diligently interview prospects — going beyond standard questions about compensation to inquire about culture, associate retention and other areas that can provide a more comprehensive view, says Lauren Wu at VOYLegal.

  • My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • Calif. Hotel Ruling Holds Lessons On Letters Of Intent

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    A California appellate court's recent decision in Munoz v. Patel, finding a hotel owner's letter of intent to be legally binding, is an important reminder that real estate parties negotiating and drafting letters of intent should make sure to include nonbinding disclaimers, says Jeff Brown at Thompson Coburn.

  • ABA's No-Contact Rule Advice Raises Questions For Lawyers

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    The American Bar Association's ethics committee recently issued two opinions concerning the no-contact rule — one creates an intuitive and practical default for electronic communications, while the other sets a potential trap for pro se lawyers, say Lauren Snyder and Deepika Ravi at HWG.

  • Construction Cos. Can Address Social Media In Settlements

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    Negative social media posts are increasingly factoring into construction disputes, and attorneys must understand what to prioritize when negotiating such issues in settlement agreements, say Gary Strong and Dinora Lopez at Gfeller Laurie.