We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close
Lead Story Picture
Europe’s highest court has ruled that Britain can revoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, allowing it to unilaterally reverse the process of leaving the European Union. (AP)

ECJ Rules UK Can Unilaterally Cancel Brexit Process

The European Court of Justice ruled on Monday that Britain can unilaterally reverse the process of leaving the European Union, boosting a campaign to stop Brexit with a second referendum if Parliament remains deadlocked over the withdrawal agreement now on offer.

  • John Gibbons, Former 3rd Circ. Chief Judge, Dies At 94

    John J. Gibbons, a Gibbons PC name partner and former Third Circuit chief judge known as a champion of civil liberties, staunch constitutionalist and fierce critic of the death penalty, died Sunday at the age of 94, the law firm said.

  • Supreme Court Agrees To Reconsider 'Auer' Deference

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to reconsider a key precedent of administrative law that tells judges to defer to an agency's interpretation of its own ambiguous regulation, taking up a challenge to so-called Auer or Seminole Rock deference, which has been criticized by several conservative justices on the court.

  • UK's May Delays Brexit Vote After Rebellion In Own Ranks

    Theresa May postponed a key parliamentary Brexit vote on Monday to stave off a potentially crippling defeat, as the prime minister succumbed to pressure from inside her own Conservative Party to press the European Union for a better deal.

  • Attys Get $503M In Fees For Syngenta GMO Corn Settlement

    A Kansas federal judge gave final approval Friday to Syngenta AG's $1.5 billion deal to resolve claims filed on behalf of 650,000 corn producers over the agricultural giant's genetically modified corn seed, a deal that handed class counsel a $503 million cut.

  • Mueller Says Manafort Lied About Contact With Trump Admin.

    Paul Manafort lied to prosecutors about several things, including his claim that he was not in contact with the Trump administration earlier this year, in violation of his plea agreement, special prosecutor Robert Mueller told a D.C. federal court Friday.

  • Chinese Cos. Eluding US Scrutiny, Hurting Investors: SEC

    Wall Street regulators issued an unusually strong rebuke Friday of their counterparts in China for continuing to shield reports that could indicate whether public companies based there are playing fairly in U.S. exchanges.

  • CFPB Settles With State Farm Over Credit Reporting Errors

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday settled claims that State Farm Bank FSB improperly obtained consumer reports and gave inaccurate information to credit-reporting agencies, ordering the federal savings association to implement corrective policies without any fines imposed — a move that's drawn the ire of consumer advocates.

  • Kirkland & Ellis Chairman To Retire, Successor Named

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP's longtime chairman Jeffrey Hammes will retire in early 2020 and will be replaced by Jon Ballis, a Chicago-based private equity partner and member of the firm's global management executive committee, according to a Friday internal memo obtained by Law360.

  • Trump Trial Court Pick Unlikely To Get Vote, Grassley Says

    President Donald Trump's choice for a North Carolina federal judgeship will likely be sent back to the White House after prospects for confirmation this year dwindled to nil, the head of the Senate Judiciary Committee said.  

  • FCC Halts $4.5B Subsidy Project To Probe Carrier Data

    The Federal Communications Commission said Friday it's opening an investigation into whether major carriers fudged nationwide coverage maps submitted within a $4.53 billion agency initiative to bring high-speed access to rural areas, pausing the project after early looks at carrier data pointed to "significant violations" of the rules.

  • Michael Cohen Deserves 'Substantial Prison Term,' Feds Say

    Prosecutors told a Manhattan federal judge Friday that Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer and political champion, should be sentenced to a “substantial prison term” — possibly in the range of four years — after Cohen copped to a series of crimes including lying to Congress and tax evasion in two plea hearings.

  • Kirkland Nixes Forced Arbitration For Non-Attorney Staff

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP told employees it would end its policy of requiring arbitration to settle employment disputes for all non-attorney staff, according to a memo obtained Friday by Law360 and following public pressure mounted by a group of Harvard Law School students.