We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close
Lead Story Picture
Broadcasters Sinclair Broadcast Group, Raycom Media, Tribune Media, Meredith, Griffin Communications and Dreamcatcher Broadcasting have reached a deal with the Department of Justice to resolve allegations they shared ad pricing information. (AP)

6 Broadcasters Settle With DOJ To Resolve Antitrust Probe

The U.S. Department of Justice has reached a settlement with six broadcast television companies to resolve a complaint by the DOJ's Antitrust Division in D.C. federal court that the companies shared pricing information, the department announced Tuesday.

  • Palm Families Get More Than $73M In Royalty Fees, Rent

    A New York state judge on Tuesday awarded family members behind the famous Palm steakhouse — who say they were cheated out of intellectual property licensing by the cousins who built a single trendy outpost into an empire — at least $73 million in royalties and lost rent.

  • Dems Up Ante As Fla. Recount Litigation Piles Up

    With Florida's 67 counties hurrying to recount the votes in the races for U.S. senator, governor and agriculture commissioner, related litigation kept mounting Tuesday as Democrats sought extended deadlines and challenged rules for determining voter intent in two new suits.

  • NHL Ends Concussion MDL With $19M Tentative Settlement

    The National Hockey League has agreed to pay nearly $19 million to end multidistrict litigation brought by more than 300 retired players alleging they endured long-term problems from head trauma suffered on the ice, a deal some experts said fell short of expectations after the league put up a stiff defense.

  • Toys R Us Wins Approval Of Ch. 11 Creditor Payment Plan

    A Virginia bankruptcy judge on Tuesday approved a Chapter 11 plan to facilitate the wind-down of Toys R Us Inc., putting in place a means for the iconic brand to survive in a limited form and its creditors to receive some means of recovery.

  • EPA Regional Head Indicted On Ala. Ethics Charges

    An Alabama grand jury on Friday indicted the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Southeastern regional office on ethics charges, including the use of his office for personal gain, just over a year after he was appointed.

  • No Quick Win For Feds In Haitian Refugee Status Suit

    A Brooklyn federal judge declined to toss a suit Tuesday claiming racism motivated the Trump administration to revoke the temporary protected status of 50,000 Haitians in the wake of an earthquake, giving parties only two months to prepare for trial.

  • Maryland Challenges Acting AG Whitaker's Appointment

    The state of Maryland on Tuesday challenged both the legality and the constitutionality of acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's controversial appointment in Maryland federal court, seeking to declare his mandate void in the state's lawsuit over the Affordable Care Act.

  • Trump Picks Regulatory Czar For Kavanaugh's DC Circ. Seat

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday named the chief of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs for the D.C. Circuit post vacated by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, setting off a nomination fight for what's viewed as the nation's second-highest appeals court.

  • Repped By Gibson Dunn, CNN Sues Trump Over Acosta Ban

    CNN and attorneys from Gibson Dunn filed a lawsuit against President Donald Trump on Tuesday over the decision to revoke reporter Jim Acosta's access to the White House, calling it an "unabashed attempt to censor the press” that violates the First Amendment.

  • Simpson Thacher Leads Johnson Controls In $13.2B Unit Sale

    Johnson Controls, advised by Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP, said Tuesday it will sell its power solutions business for $13.2 billion to Brookfield Business Partners LP and other investors, as the technology and industrial company looks to cut noncore assets and improve its financial position.

  • Justices To Consider FCC Deference In Junk Fax Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to consider how much deference to give the Federal Communications Commission’s view of what counts as an “advertisement” under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, in a dispute that could impact the judiciary’s power to interpret agency rules.

  • NCAA Argues Fans ‘Overwhelmingly Oppose’ Paying Athletes

    The NCAA defended its rules limiting athlete compensation in a landmark antitrust California federal bench trial on Friday, arguing that college sports fans value amateurism and “overwhelmingly oppose” paying student athletes.