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The justices will hear five cases the week of Feb. 26, including the federal government's bid to force Microsoft Corp. to hand over emails stored on overseas servers. (AP)

Up Next At The High Court: Antitrust Rule, Public Unions

The U.S. Supreme Court is closing out its February oral argument session with a blockbuster docket, taking on a key doctrine of antitrust law in a case involving American Express Co. and pondering the fate of public sector unions.

  • Tribe Not Immune From Restasis IP Challenges, PTAB Says

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board ruled Friday that tribal sovereign immunity does not apply to inter partes reviews and dismissed a motion from the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe to toss generics companies' challenges to patents for the dry-eye drug Restasis, which Allergan Inc. sold to the tribe last year.

  • 2nd Circ. Gives 2nd Shot To Schwab's Libor Claims

    A Second Circuit panel on Friday breathed new life into claims brought by Charles Schwab Corp. against a slew of the world’s largest banks over their alleged manipulation of the London Interbank Offered Rate, finding that the investment firm should be given a chance to replead some of its case.

  • Manafort Associate Pleads Guilty In Mueller Probe

    Richard Gates, an ex-business associate of President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and himself a former member of the campaign, pled guilty Friday to charges brought as a part of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

  • Judge Nixes BLM's Delay Of Obama Methane Flaring Rule

    A California federal judge on Thursday lifted the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s block of an Obama-era rule limiting methane venting and flaring from natural gas wells on public and tribal lands, saying the agency’s rationale isn’t likely to pass muster.

  • Patent Agent Emails Merit Privilege, Texas Justices Say

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday sided with an inventor and upended a trial court's order that he turn over more than 300 emails between himself and his nonattorney patent agent in a dispute over restaurant technology, holding that the communications are privileged under the state's evidence rules.

  • Ex-Tech Co. CEO Admits Insider Trading In Co.'s Securities

    The former head of a Silicon Valley-based fiber optics company that Corning Inc. bought for more than $300 million in April 2016 has pled guilty to insider trading and tender offer fraud, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

  • 4th Circ. Resurrects Medical Device Co. Investor Suit

    A split Fourth Circuit panel on Thursday revived a stock fraud suit stemming from accusations that the maker of a spinal surgery system encouraged surgeons using its system to seek fraudulent reimbursement from insurers, finding in part that the company’s alleged failure to disclose the purported scheme counted as an actionable omission.

  • Ex-Foley & Lardner Partner Gets Prison For Insider Trading

    Former Foley & Lardner LLP real estate partner Walter “Chet” Little was sentenced on Thursday to over two years in prison for insider trading, following his admission that he cashed in on confidential merger information about the law firm’s clients.

  • White House Atty: Chevron Deference A Priority For Judges

    President Donald Trump has prioritized rolling back the "administrative state," White House Counsel Don McGahn said Thursday, and part of that is looking at potential judicial nominees' experience with government regulation and major guideposts like Chevron deference.

  • Trump's Ex-Campaign Officials Face New Tax, Fraud Charges

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Thursday unsealed a slew of new tax- and bank fraud-related criminal charges against President Donald Trump's former campaign officials Paul Manafort and Richard Gates, alleging they filed false income tax returns and failed to report foreign bank accounts.

  • Immigration Law Allows Trump's Travel Ban, High Court Told

    The Trump administration on Thursday defended its ban on travel to the U.S. by nationals of several predominantly Muslim countries, telling the U.S. Supreme Court that the president acted at the height of his powers under federal immigration law and the U.S. Constitution.

  • Menendez-Connected Eye Doc Gets 17 Years For $42.6M Fraud

    Dr. Salomon E. Melgen, a Florida ophthalmologist who gained notoriety as a co-defendant with U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez in an unsuccessful bribery case, was sentenced Thursday to 17 years in prison and ordered to repay nearly $42.6 million on a conviction of massively overbilling Medicare.