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Kirk Ogrosky of Arnold & Porter speaks outside the U.S. District Courthouse in West Palm Beach, Florida, following Thursday's sentencing of his client Dr. Salomon E. Melgen for health care fraud. (Nathan Hale | Law360)

Menendez-Connected Eye Doc Gets 17 Years For $42.6M Fraud

Dr. Salomon E. Melgen, a Florida ophthalmologist who gained notoriety as a co-defendant with U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez in an unsuccessful bribery case, was sentenced Thursday to 17 years in prison and ordered to repay nearly $42.6 million on a conviction of massively overbilling Medicare.

  • LA-Based Ogletree Shareholder Sued For Sexual Harassment

    Less than six weeks after being hit with a $300 million gender discrimination class action, labor and employment law firm Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC was accused Wednesday in a California state suit of allowing one of its Los Angeles shareholders to sexually harass a married, gay, Latino attorney.

  • New SEC Cybersecurity Guidance Dinged By Dems As Rehash

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday issued new guidance to public companies on how they should disclose their cybersecurity risks, but the effort was faulted by the agency’s Democratic commissioners, who said the SEC essentially reissued old advice without providing much new.

  • Companies May Find High Court Whistleblower Ruling Costly

    A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Wednesday narrowing the scope of anti-retaliation protections for corporate whistleblowers could lead to a significant increase in the number of complaints filed directly with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a result companies may find costly, legal experts said.

  • LendingClub Unveils $125M Settlement Of Investor Suits

    LendingClub Corp. on Tuesday said it has reached a $125 million preliminary settlement with the plaintiffs behind two securities class actions in California federal and state court that allege the peer-to-peer lending company misled investors in the run-up to its $1 billion initial public offering in 2014.

  • EU Auto Shippers, Part Cos. Settle Cartel Probes For $673M

    European Union antitrust officials on Wednesday announced three separate settlements totaling €546 million ($673 million) with maritime car shippers and automotive parts suppliers that admitted price-fixing and improper coordination via cartels that allocated customers.

  • Disney Suit Against Redbox Is Copyright Misuse, Judge Says

    A California federal judge on Tuesday refused to give Walt Disney Co. a court order that would have barred Redbox from renting digital movies at its kiosks, calling the studio’s case a misuse of copyright law.

  • Andrews Kurth, Hunton & Williams Will Combine In April

    After months of rumors and negotiations, the merger between Texas-based Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP and Virginia's Hunton & Williams LLP has been resoundingly approved by partner votes at both firms, and the union is on track to completion by the end of the quarter, the firms announced Wednesday.

  • Supreme Court Narrows Definition Of Whistleblower

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled in favor of a narrow definition of the term "whistleblower," a decision that will significantly limit the scope of anti-retaliation measures meant to protect whistleblowers under the Dodd-Frank Act.

  • Justices Say Guilty Pleas Don't Stop Constitutional Claims

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled 6-3 that criminal defendants can challenge the constitutionality of laws they already pled guilty to breaking if they didn't explicitly waive the right to do so.

  • Wilmington Suit Over Ex-Chesapeake CEO's $464M Debt Stays

    A New York federal judge on Friday largely left intact a suit brought by Wilmington Trust National Association over a $464 million loan guaranty from the late Chesapeake Energy CEO and part-owner of the NBA's Oklahoma City Thunder, finding the court has jurisdiction to hear the case.

  • GM, Bosch Can't Dodge Drivers' Emissions-Cheating Claims

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday denied bids by General Motors LLC and Robert Bosch LLC to escape a proposed class action claiming that so-called defeat devices similar to those used in Volkswagen’s diesel cars are installed in some GM vehicles, saying the drivers plausibly alleged a conspiracy.

  • High Court Turns Away Fannie, Freddie Investor Appeals

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday denied a plea from investors hoping for reconsideration of their case challenging the federal government’s conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, reinforcing a lower court’s ruling that the Federal Housing Finance Agency cannot be sued over its role in managing the mortgage finance duo.