Ohio

  • December 09, 2022

    Tribe Says Insurer Must Cover $5.3M Casino Voucher Fraud

    An Ohio-based insurance company has unlawfully refused to cover the more than $5 million stolen from a Florida Native American tribe's casino through a multiyear "ghost credits" scheme, the tribe alleged in a Thursday lawsuit against the insurance provider.

  • December 09, 2022

    AGs Have Nothing New On $4B Albertsons Payout, Court Told

    Albertsons urged a D.C. federal judge Thursday to again reject the efforts of state attorneys general to block its planned $4 billion shareholder payout, arguing enforcers have offered nothing new to reverse prior conclusions that the dividend is separate from a planned merger with Kroger.

  • December 09, 2022

    Ohio Mansion Owner Can't Demolish Zoning Law, Panel Says

    The owner of a historic mansion in a suburb of Cleveland can't do away with a local zoning law that prevents her from converting the property into condos, a state appeals court has said, finding that the ordinance reflects a legitimate interest in preserving the town's character.

  • December 09, 2022

    Arnold & Porter Advises $356M Self-Storage Transaction

    Florida self-storage investor SROA Capital has closed on a $356 million mortgage covering a series of self-storage properties in five states, in a transaction advised by Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP.

  • December 09, 2022

    Ohio Dry-Cleaning Startup Fraud Suit Halted Amid Ch. 11

    An Ohio federal judge has halted the fraud suit a Cincinnati investment firm filed over the collapse of an online dry-cleaning delivery startup after the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

  • December 08, 2022

    Exotic Dancer Says Ohio Club Pays Low Wages, Siphons Tips

    An Ohio nightclub has been hit with a proposed class and collective action in federal court alleging it cheated exotic dancers out of adequate pay and siphoned a portion of their tips, in violation of state and federal wage laws.

  • December 08, 2022

    Ex-Federal Prosecutor's Sex Harassment Sanction Deal Nixed

    An Ohio board has rejected a deal between attorney disciplinary authorities and a former federal prosecutor who admitted to sexually harassing an intern, saying it wanted to hear the lawyer testify at a hearing.

  • December 08, 2022

    Pa. Record Label Sues Ohio Co. Over Blown Festival Budget

    An Ohio-based concert production company overshot its budget for a Pittsburgh-area music festival and kept the event's revenue without permission, according to a federal lawsuit filed in Ohio by the record label behind the festival.

  • December 08, 2022

    Teamsters Pension Fund Gets $36B To Stave Off Benefit Cuts

    President Joe Biden said Thursday that the federal government will give $36 billion to the Central States pension fund to avert steep benefit cuts at one of the largest multi-employer pension plans in the country.  

  • December 08, 2022

    Senate Confirms Ohio Judge, Committee Advances 5 Picks

    The Senate confirmed an Ohio district court pick Thursday and advanced the nominations of judges for the Third and Fifth Circuits, setting up confirmations for as soon as next week.

  • December 08, 2022

    6th Circ. Takes On Kentucky Abortion Clinic's 'Buffer Zone'

    Sixth Circuit judges on Thursday weighed the constitutionality of a Louisville, Kentucky, law creating a 10-foot "buffer zone" around the entrance of an abortion clinic, continuously citing a 2014 U.S. Supreme Court case and questioning how the justices' unanimous holding should apply to the present case.

  • December 07, 2022

    Chauvin Prosecutor Among 4 Attys Elevated To Federal Bench

    The Senate on Wednesday confirmed four nominees for district courts in Pennsylvania and Minnesota, including a BakerHostetler partner in Philadelphia and the Minneapolis attorney who served as a special prosecutor in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who was convicted of the murder of George Floyd.

  • December 07, 2022

    3rd Circ. Rules FERC Can Defend Power Market Subsidy Rule

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission can defend a substantial energy market change resulting from a commission deadlock, a Third Circuit panel ruled Wednesday, rejecting a challenge to the agency's engagement in a case brought by power producers and two state utility regulators.

  • December 07, 2022

    6th Circ. Mulls Rejecting 2-Step FLSA Collective Procedure​​​​​​​

    A panel of Sixth Circuit judges on Wednesday pondered whether to become the second federal appeals court to disapprove the common two-step procedure district courts use for certifying Fair Labor Standards Act collectives in suits covering multiple workers.

  • December 07, 2022

    Ohio Justices Send Solar Fees Case Back To Clarify Tax Issue

    The Buckeye State's high court on Wednesday mostly upheld the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio's order directing utility companies to collect fees for a $20 million fund incentivizing solar energy production, though it sent a case challenging it back to the commission to clarify if customers should be stuck with a commercial tax.

  • December 07, 2022

    Trump Resort Wants Out Of Contract Spat Over Rock Festival

    The Trump International Beach Resort in Florida is looking to dodge a federal lawsuit accusing it of backing out of an arrangement to host a rock music festival, telling an Ohio federal judge it has zero contacts with the state and should never have been sued there.

  • December 07, 2022

    Horse-Racing Authority Given Too Much Power, 6th Circ. Told

    The Sixth Circuit on Wednesday weighed a constitutional challenge to the regulatory power held by a private entity tasked with establishing certain horse-racing rules, as states and industry organizations urged a panel to find the law that created the entity takes too much power away from the Federal Trade Commission.

  • December 07, 2022

    6th Circ. Judge Says GM's Line On Ill Worker 'A Little Harsh'

    A Sixth Circuit panel grappled Wednesday with whether a General Motors worker who was diagnosed with a brain tumor after getting fired should get another shot at her disability bias suit, with one judge calling the company's stance "a little harsh."

  • December 06, 2022

    Ohio Justices Say Fleeing Doc Can't Wait Out Med Mal Suits

    A split Ohio Supreme Court on Tuesday said the time limit to file medical malpractice claims can be extended if the medical practitioner being sued absconds from the state, a ruling that is expected to revive many lawsuits against a Cincinnati surgeon who fled following his indictment.

  • December 06, 2022

    6th Circ. Revives DACA Recipient's Deportation Arrest Suit

    The Sixth Circuit has ruled that the Kentucky federal court shouldn't have dismissed a lawsuit from a beneficiary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program challenging her deportation arrest, saying courts can review arrests of people protected from removal.

  • December 06, 2022

    Ohio Atty Accused Of Hiding Past In New Career Bid

    An Ohio lawyer who gained notoriety for producing fake child pornography images and using them in court made false statements on his application to obtain his physician assistant license, according to a disciplinary complaint.

  • December 06, 2022

    FTC Extends Review Of Kroger, Albertsons $24.6B Deal

    Regulatory scrutiny of the proposed merger of The Kroger Co. and Albertsons grocery chains deepened with a second request from the Federal Trade Commission for more information about the deal, according to a Tuesday announcement.

  • December 06, 2022

    Insurer Doesn't Owe Coverage For Ga. Water Pollution Claims

    Grange Insurance does not owe coverage to a Georgia thermoplastics recycling facility in a proposed class action over the alleged release of so-called forever chemicals into state waterways, a Georgia federal court ruled, finding the policy's total pollution exclusion unambiguously bars coverage.

  • December 06, 2022

    GOP-Led States Want Full 8th Circ. Hearing On Carbon Metrics

    A group of Republican-led states has asked the full Eighth Circuit to hear a challenge to the way the Biden administration calculates greenhouse gas pollution harm, arguing a court panel decision allowed the executive to circumvent mandatory public process when it put the new metric into effect.

  • December 05, 2022

    AGs Want 'Breakneck' Speed In Albertsons Payout Challenge

    The District of Columbia, California and Illinois asked a D.C. federal court on Monday to approve a "breakneck" briefing schedule of a matter of days for their effort to block Albertsons' planned $4 billion shareholder payout, arguing that it's necessary because the payout could occur as early as Dec. 9.

Expert Analysis

  • 6th Circ. Clarifies Notice Rules For Intermittent FMLA Leave

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Render v. FCA, centered on employee obligations under the Family and Medical Leave Act to provide notice before taking intermittent leave, suggests four takeaways for employers and practitioners navigating the minefield of FMLA administrative and regulatory requirements, says Robert Dare at Clark Hill.

  • 3 Pricing Trends In Law Firm Use Of Litigation Funding

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    As BigLaw firms increasingly include litigation funding as a financing option for clients, internal pricing groups are taking the lead on standardizing and centralizing firm processes, and aggregating risk budgets, says Brendan Dyer at Woodsford Group.

  • Reviewing Separation Agreement Compliance Before Layoffs

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    As a potential recession triggers layoff considerations, employers should begin reviewing their separation agreement templates to ensure they include the desired protections for the employer while complying with applicable, and recently amended, state laws, says Victoria Hubona at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Safeguarding Attorneys' Greatest Asset: Our Mental Health

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    Attorneys who understand that mental fitness is their most valuable characteristic should prioritize mental health care accordingly, including with certain activities they may not realize qualify as self-care, says Wendy Robbins at Holland & Knight.

  • How 6th Circ. Flint Ruling Adds To 5th Amendment Case Law

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    The Sixth Circuit’s recent decision in Walters v. Snyder, holding that witnesses can testify at deposition but later invoke their right against self-incrimination at trial in the same case, is significant and long overdue in Fifth Amendment jurisprudence — but its practical effect is limited in parallel proceedings, say Ronald Blum and Rebecca Kimmel at Manatt.

  • Could State Ownership Solve US Cannabis Policy Issues?

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    Provincial cannabis wholesalers in Canada are enjoying huge profits, begging the question of whether a government-owned cannabis model could eventually be replicated in the U.S. to tackle issues ranging from social equity to overproduction — but this would undoubtedly introduce other complex challenges, says Hilary Bricken at Harris Bricken.

  • Why The EPA Has Made Little Progress On EJ Litigation

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    Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken numerous steps to promote environmental justice goals, recent court cases show little progress in achieving those goals through judicial enforcement — and the lack of such cases may not be the agency's fault, says Jeffrey Corey at Parsons Behle.

  • Property Policies Could Cover Organized Retail Crime Losses

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    Following a recent surge in organized retail crime, policyholders can look to case law that suggests they may be able to skirt property policy loss exclusions if they can produce evidence of theft, says Micah Skidmore at Haynes Boone.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • State AG Consumer Protection Shift Isn't An Election Fad

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    We are starting to see the first signs of a new state attorney general consumer enforcement paradigm emerge — with creative use of most favored nation clauses as structural tools — and that is unlikely to end when the last ballot is counted for the 2022 election, says O.H. Skinner at Alliance for Consumers.

  • Ohio Tax Talk: One Step Closer To Telework Income Tax Clarity

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    An Ohio court's recent ruling in Morsy v. Dumas that Cleveland must reimburse city tax on income an employee earned while she worked from another state during the pandemic is limited in the time period to which it applies, but may have important ramifications for the Ohio municipal income tax system as a whole, say Raghav Agnihotri and Rachael Chamberlain at Frost Brown.

  • Questions To Ask Before Making A Lateral Move As Partner

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    Law firm partners considering lateral moves should diligently interview prospects — going beyond standard questions about compensation to inquire about culture, associate retention and other areas that can provide a more comprehensive view, says Lauren Wu at VOYLegal.

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