Government Contracts

  • October 21, 2021

    CDC Backs COVID-19 Booster Shots For All 3 Vaccines

    The Centers for Disease Control on Thursday recommended COVID-19 booster shots for millions of Americans, officially endorsing additional shots of all three available vaccines available in the U.S. just a day after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave its blessing to Moderna and Johnson & Johnson boosters.

  • October 21, 2021

    Texas, Missouri Sue To Force Biden To Build Border Wall

    Texas and Missouri on Thursday asked a Lone Star State federal court to force President Joe Biden to restart construction on the Southern border wall, arguing that his administration broke the law when it halted construction even though Congress already designated billions for the project.

  • October 21, 2021

    5 Accused Of Laundering Funds From Venezuela Bribery Plot

    A grand jury indictment was unsealed Thursday in federal court in Miami charging three Colombian citizens and two Venezuelans with using U.S. accounts to launder a portion of $1.6 billion they allegedly obtained from contracts with the Venezuelan government secured through bribes to provide food and medicine.

  • October 21, 2021

    Claims Court Backs Space Force's Decision To Nix $113M Deal

    A Court of Federal Claims judge handed the U.S. Air Force a win Thursday against Florida engineering consulting firm Yang Enterprises Inc.'s allegations that the agency arbitrarily canceled a solicitation for support services worth an estimated $113 million at a tracking station in the South Atlantic called Ascension Island.

  • October 21, 2021

    OIG Says NSA Lacks Oversight On Cost-Type Contracts

    The National Security Agency's process for verifying claimed costs on its cost-reimbursement contracts is inefficient and insufficient, leading to hundreds of millions of dollars in questionable cost claims, according to a watchdog report.

  • October 21, 2021

    Flint Council Can't Stop McLaren Settlement Payment

    A Michigan federal judge said the Flint City Council's inaction can't stand in the way of McLaren Healthcare Corp.'s promise to pay $5 million into a proposed civil settlement over the lead water crisis, an amount that is down from the $20 million the medical center initially proposed.

  • October 21, 2021

    Dems Bring Human Rights Arms Trade Bill To The House

    Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday introduced their version of a bill aimed at blocking oppressive regimes' access to U.S. weapons, following up on identical arms trade legislation brought before the U.S. Senate earlier this year.

  • October 20, 2021

    'Mix-And-Match' COVID-19 Boosters Win FDA Clearance

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved the emergency use of "mix-and-match" COVID-19 vaccine boosters, meaning eligible individuals can get a booster shot of a vaccine that's different from the vaccine they initially received.

  • October 20, 2021

    Aussie Mining Co. Asks DC Judge To Nix Pakistan's New Info

    An Australian mining company has urged a D.C. federal judge to disregard additional information that Pakistan has introduced in the country's bid to pause a $6 billion arbitration award enforcement suit against it, saying the stay decisions it mentions add nothing new.

  • October 20, 2021

    Biden's Embrace Of Border Tech Raises Privacy Concerns

    President Joe Biden hasn't shied away from using controversial technologies for immigration enforcement, raising concerns that his predecessor's pet project to build a border wall is being replaced with a "virtual wall" rife with privacy and civil liberties problems.

  • October 20, 2021

    No Delaying Key Deposition In $100M AECOM Fraud Suit

    A Louisiana federal court has refused to delay the deposition of a former AECOM employee accused of doctoring reports to defraud the Federal Emergency Management Agency out of $100 million, over the company's protests that the scheduled January 2022 deposition was too soon.

  • October 20, 2021

    8th Circ. Sends Civilians' 3M Earplug Suits To State Court

    The Eighth Circuit on Wednesday sent to state court civilians' claims that they were not warned about the alleged dangers of earplugs originally designed for the military by a company now owned by 3M Co., saying the military's specifications did not constrain what warnings the company put in the commercially sold models.

  • October 20, 2021

    5th Circ. Wants DOJ Input On Full Court Review Of ICE Policy

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday asked the federal government to respond to Texas and Louisiana's petition for the full appellate court to review a panel's decision allowing the Biden administration's policy curbing immigration enforcement operations to remain in place.

  • October 20, 2021

    EPA Settles Bee Die-Off Pesticide Suit With NRDC

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday agreed to analyze within three years whether certain active ingredients used in pesticides might impact endangered species, after an environmental group challenged approvals for the chemicals.

  • October 19, 2021

    CFPB's 1st Case Under Chopra Hits Prison Prepaid Card Co.

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Tuesday that a leading private-equity-backed provider of financial services to prisons must pay a $2 million fine and refund $4 million in restitution as part of the first enforcement action brought by the agency since Rohit Chopra took over as its director.

  • October 19, 2021

    Fla. Doctor Escapes Inmate's Amputation Suit

    A Florida federal judge tossed claims by a formerly imprisoned man who said inadequate treatment by a correctional facility doctor led to a heart attack and the amputation of both his legs, finding that while the physician's care was wanting it was also not deliberately indifferent.

  • October 19, 2021

    GEO Group Can't Pull ICE Director Into $1-A-Day Wage Retrial

    A Washington federal judge denied GEO Group's request that he order U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement's director to testify in the middle of a retrial over its $1-a-day wages for migrant detainees at a Tacoma holding center.

  • October 19, 2021

    Drop DOD Vax Mandate, Top Armed Services GOP Sen. Says

    Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., has urged the U.S. Department of Defense to halt its COVID-19 vaccine mandate, arguing that it's "politically motivated," "haphazardly implemented" and would negatively affect military readiness and morale.

  • October 19, 2021

    High Claims Volume In Design-Build Makes Insuring Onerous

    As design-build construction projects have been growing more popular, the high potential project losses and number of claims has made insuring these projects more expensive, according to experts.

  • October 19, 2021

    Oil Co. Wins Discovery For Ukraine's Unpaid $112M Award

    A District of Columbia federal judge on Monday ordered Ukraine to comply with discovery requests from Russian oil company PAO Tatneft, slamming Ukraine for "stonewalling" Tatneft in its efforts to enforce a $112 million arbitration award the company won.

  • October 19, 2021

    DOD Denies Flouting Immigrant Soldier Citizenship Order

    The Pentagon denied foreign-born soldiers' contention that it was flouting an injunction to process their citizenship requests, telling a Washington, D.C., court that it was complying and close to doubling the number of requests that are processed annually.

  • October 19, 2021

    CEO Of Defense Contractor Faces Navy Bribery Charge

    The CEO of a defense contractor accused of bribing U.S. Navy officials and defrauding the Navy through inflated invoices has appeared before a D.C. federal judge after voluntarily returning to the U.S., the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • October 19, 2021

    Ex-Perkins Coie Atty Rejoins Cooley To Lead Gov't Contracts

    A former Perkins Coie LLP partner is returning to Cooley LLP as the leader of its government contracts practice, the firm said Tuesday, as it looks to build on its capabilities in areas including export control and the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

  • October 18, 2021

    Arapaho Tribe Received Full Health Payments, 10th Circ. Told

    The federal government has told the Tenth Circuit it has no duty to reimburse the Northern Arapaho Tribe for third-party costs billed by Medicare, Medicaid and private insurers beyond what it has already paid under an annual agreement, saying the tribe has received all the money it's owed.

  • October 18, 2021

    Senate Panel Proposes $726B Defense Funding Bill For 2022

    The Senate Appropriations Committee on Monday released a draft $725.8 billion bill to fund defense operations for fiscal year 2022, a nearly $30 billion increase on 2021 defense funding.

Expert Analysis

  • What To Watch In Telehealth Enforcement

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    Telehealth providers should pay attention to three enforcement trends that have emerged at the U.S. Department of Justice and take certain steps now to reduce the risk of fraud, say Kate Driscoll and Logan Wren at MoFo.

  • Financial Planning Tips For Retiring Law Firm Partners

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    As the pandemic accelerates retirement plans for many, Michael Delgass at Wealthspire Advisors outlines some financial considerations unique to law firm partners, including the need for adequate liquidity whether they have capital accounts or pension plans.

  • State Actions Put Federal Contractors In COVID Vaccine Bind

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    As state-level efforts — such as an executive order in Texas and a new law in Arkansas — aim to counteract President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 vaccination mandates, government contractors are caught in a whipsaw because complying with both sets of requirements is not possible, says Karla Grossenbacher at Seyfarth.

  • Preparing Remote Deposition Defenses For Corporate Entities

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    As remote depositions will remain common for the foreseeable future, attorneys defending a deposition notice or subpoena to a corporation should implement certain strategies to mitigate unique challenges, such as less planning time and increased difficulty of establishing rapport with witnesses, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Perspectives

    Why Law Schools Should Require Justice Reform Curriculum

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    Criminal defense attorney Donna Mulvihill Fehrmann argues that law schools have an obligation to address widespread racial and economic disparities in the U.S. legal system by mandating first-year coursework on criminal justice reform that educates on prosecutorial misconduct, wrongful convictions, defense 101 and more.

  • How Canceling The Border Wall Affects Gov't Contractors

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    President Joe Biden's cancellation of the border wall project has left some federal contractors in the lurch, but including protective flow-down termination clauses in their contracts can guard against subcontractor liability and ensure recovery, says Adrien Pickard at Shapiro Lifschitz.

  • New Contractor Insights On 'Other Transaction' Bid Protests

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    Based on recent case law, including the U.S. Court of Federal Claims’ recent ruling in Kinemetrics v. U.S., contractors interested in protesting so-called other transaction agreements should focus not on whether to file but on which federal court is appropriate for doing so, say Locke Bell and Krista Nunez at MoFo.

  • 4 Antitrust Risk Areas To Watch For Government Contractors

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    To plan for the increased likelihood of detection and stiff penalties for antitrust violations following the anticipated passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, compliance efforts should focus on joint bidding, dual distribution, legal certifications, and hiring and compensation, say Andre Geverola and Lori Taubman at Arnold & Porter.

  • Girardi Scandal Provides Important Ethics Lessons

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    The litigation and media maelstrom following allegations that famed plaintiffs attorney Thomas Girardi and his law firm misappropriated clients' funds provides myriad ethics and professional responsibility lessons for practitioners, especially with regard to misconduct reporting and liability insurance, says Elizabeth Tuttle Newman at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Takeaways From DC Circ. Medicare Overpayment Ruling

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent decision in UnitedHealth v. Becerra, reinstating a rule that requires Medicare Advantage organizations to refund certain overpayments, is a near-complete victory for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, but arguably abandons the rule's negligence standard, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Jabil GC Talks Compliance Preparation

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    Tried-and-true compliance lessons from recent decades can be applied to companies’ environmental, social and governance efforts, especially with regard to employee training and consistent application of policies — two factors that can create a foundation for ESG criteria to flourish, says Robert Katz at Jabil.

  • 3 Ways CLOs Can Drive ESG Efforts

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    Chief legal officers are specially trained to see the legal industry's flaws, and they can leverage that perspective to push their companies toward effective environmental, social and governance engagement, says Mark Chandler at Stanford Law School.

  • Qui Tam Order Shows Concern Over FCA Plaintiffs' Leverage

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    In Jehl v. GGNSC Southaven, a Mississippi federal court's recent decision to sidestep the question of False Claims Act liability in a health care fraud case questions the fairness and appropriateness of the significant leverage provided to plaintiffs in FCA qui tam actions, say Jack Selden and Kya Henley at Bradley Arant.

  • How Law Firms Can Rethink Offices In A Post-Pandemic World

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    Based on their own firm's experiences, Kami Quinn and Adam Farra at Gilbert discuss strategies and unique legal industry considerations for law firms planning hybrid models of remote and in-office work in a post-COVID marketplace.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing, Line Items, Source Selection

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Alissandra Young and Michaela Thornton at MoFo look at three decisions from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and the U.S. Government Accountability Office, each involving a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs solicitation and each with its own important reminder for disappointed bidders.

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