We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Government Contracts

  • September 24, 2018

    Pentagon Spectrum Expert Predicts More Dynamic Sharing

    As Pentagon spectrum expert Frederick Moorefield Jr. sees it, the rise of mobile services has burdened the airwaves like never before and the government must consider increasingly complex sharing arrangements to accommodate wireless consumers while still securing important military communications.

  • September 24, 2018

    Defense Dept. Falling Short Of Cost Savings Goals, GAO Says

    The U.S. Department of Defense is at least $800 million short, if not more, of a congressionally-mandated goal to slash spending on administrative and support activities with roughly a year left to hit the target, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said in a report Monday.

  • September 24, 2018

    Group Eyes Quick Win In DC Student Loan Servicer Regs Suit

    A student loan servicing trade group has asked a D.C. federal judge for a quick win in its lawsuit that seeks to block the District of Columbia’s recent moves to license and regulate loan servicers operating there, pushing back against the city’s bid to torpedo the case altogether.

  • September 24, 2018

    Ala. Hospital Reaches $4.3M FCA Deal Over Toxicology Tests

    East Alabama Medical Center and its subsidiary Aperian Laboratory Solutions LLC have agreed to pay $4.25 million to settle allegations that they violated the False Claims Act by paying kickbacks in exchange for toxicology lab test referrals, according to the whistleblower’s attorneys.

  • September 24, 2018

    OMB Unveils New Cloud Strategy In Tech Modernization Push

    The White House Office of Management and Budget released a proposed “Cloud Smart” strategy Monday, meant to drive increased federal adoption of cloud computing by slashing red tape and improving related acquisition, employment and cybersecurity practices.

  • September 24, 2018

    Ex-Symantec CEO To Lead DOD Tech Outreach Unit

    Former Symantec CEO Michael Brown, the author of a prominent recent paper on Chinese investment in U.S. technology startups, has been chosen to lead the U.S. Department of Defense's technology industry outreach arm, the Defense Innovation Unit, the DIU announced Monday.

  • September 21, 2018

    United Technologies Lands Parts Contract Worth Up To $2.5B

    United Technologies Corp. will receive up to almost $2.5 billion to provide parts for the U.S. Air Force under a contract modification, while PoleZero Corp. nabbed a nearly $66.7 million award for military aircraft equipment and services, according to a pair of announcements.

  • September 21, 2018

    Labs Lose Challenge To 'Industry Crippling' Medicare Pay Cut

    A D.C. federal judge on Friday tossed a lab industry challenge to purportedly “industry crippling” cuts to Medicare reimbursement, finding that Congress prohibited court review of the disputed payment policy.

  • September 21, 2018

    VA Overhauls Vet-Owned Small Biz Ownership Verification

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs on Friday issued a rule overhauling its veteran-owned small business verification program, putting sole responsibility for verifying veteran ownership and control in the hands of the Small Business Administration.

  • September 21, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a London no dealing desk sue Merrill Lynch for breach of fiduciary duty, more competition claims against Visa and MasterCard and a German shipper bring a suit against Axa and other insurers.

  • September 21, 2018

    Sandia Can't Pause Discovery In Gender Bias Action

    A New Mexico federal judge has denied Sandia Corp.'s motion to stay discovery in a proposed class action from female employees accusing the nuclear weapons research lab operator of systemic bias, finding that allowing discovery to continue would let the case wrap up sooner.

  • September 21, 2018

    Sens. Urge DOJ Watchdog To Probe FBI HQ Project

    A group of Democratic senators has urged a U.S. Department of Justice watchdog to look into the “abrupt” decision to abandon a plan to relocate FBI headquarters, particularly any influence the White House may have had, according to an announcement Friday.

  • September 21, 2018

    Armstrong Doping Whistleblower Appeals Denial of Damages

    The whistleblower who started a successful False Claims Act suit against cyclist Lance Armstrong's former team said Friday he will appeal the D.C. district court’s decision to deny him $32 million in damages for his part in exposing the alleged fraud.

  • September 21, 2018

    $13B Cost Estimate For Space Force Overblown, Analyst Says

    The U.S. Air Force’s recent estimate that a proposal to establish a U.S. Space Force will cost $13 billion is likely too high and an example of “malicious compliance,” a prominent defense analyst said.

  • September 20, 2018

    Debarred Subcontractor Sinks Army Deal, GAO Finds

    The U.S. Army reasonably rescinded nearly $65 million in information technology task orders for the Afghan government when it discovered the main subcontractor was debarred in Afghanistan, the U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled in a decision made public Thursday.

  • September 20, 2018

    Cybersecurity Soon To Be Key To DOD Deals, Official Says

    Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said Wednesday that strong cybersecurity will likely become one of the key pillars for determining U.S. Department of Defense contract awards in the future, also laying out further details on the DOD’s plans for implementing the proposed U.S. Space Force.

  • September 20, 2018

    White House Cyber Plan Calls For Deterrence, Legal Revamp

    The White House warned Thursday that it would authorize offensive cybersecurity operations and "modernize" federal computer crime laws as part of a new national cybersecurity strategy.

  • September 20, 2018

    Award In Saudi Contract Row Should Be Nixed, Court Hears

    A U.S. military contractor urged a Georgia federal court on Wednesday to toss a suit seeking to confirm an emergency arbitral award ordering it not to terminate a subcontract under a deal to help maintain Saudi Arabian military aircraft, arguing that it never agreed to arbitrate the dispute.

  • September 20, 2018

    Chicago Train Subcontractor Says It's Owed $8M For Work

    An engineering subcontractor for a Chicago L train renovation project slapped general contractor Ragnar Benson Construction LLC with an $8 million lawsuit in Illinois federal court Wednesday, alleging the construction firm prevented the engineering company from altering the subcontract to account for excusable delays and withheld payment for services already rendered.

  • September 20, 2018

    Cuomo's Former Right-Hand Man Gets 6 Years For Bribery

    A Manhattan federal judge hit Joe Percoco, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's former top aide, with a six-year prison term Thursday for taking bribes in exchange for helping allies in the energy and real estate sectors with state projects, telling the defendant his actions were "corrosive" to the workings of government.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Block Reviews 'Tough Cases'

    Judge Frederic Block

    In a new, extraordinary book, "Tough Cases: Judges Tell the Stories of Some of the Hardest Decisions They’ve Ever Made," 13 of my judicial brethren have courageously and dramatically humanized the judicial process, says U.S. District Judge Frederic Block of the Eastern District of New York.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Highlights Bid Protester Standing Issues

    Stuart Turner

    There is friction between the need for courts to consider the standing of government contract bid protesters and the exclusive authority of the procuring agency to perform evaluations. The Federal Circuit's decision last week in CliniComp provides an illustration, say Stuart Turner and Nathaniel Castellano of Arnold & Porter.

  • The Insurance And Tax Consequences Of Settling FCA Cases

    Andy Liu

    When you settle a False Claims Act case, will you have to pay the money out of pocket, or could some or all of it be covered by insurance? Can you write off some or all of the amount from your taxes? ​​​​​​​Andy Liu and Jason Lynch of Nichols Liu LLP address these questions and survey the relevant case law.

  • 8 Innovative Ways To Empower Jurors

    Christopher Campbell

    Much time and attention have been focused on improving lawyers' abilities to communicate with and persuade juries in complex trials. But it is equally important to equip and prepare jurors to become better students in the courtroom, say attorneys with DLA Piper and Litstrat Inc.

  • Cloud Computing Clearly The Future For Small Firms

    Holly Urban

    While in-house technology investments on the scale and complexity needed to compete with large firms remain cost prohibitive for small and midsize law firms, cloud-based services offer significant cost savings and productivity gains with little to no capital investment, says Holly Urban of Effortless Legal LLC.

  • Leveraging Today's Lateral Associate Market

    Darin Morgan

    With the Milbank/Cravath pay scale once again equalizing compensation at many Am Law 100 firms, there is even more pressure for firms to differentiate themselves to top lateral associate candidates. This presents strategic considerations for both law firms and lateral candidates throughout the recruitment process, says Darin Morgan of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Aviation Watch: Why The F-35 Has Struggled To Take Flight

    Alan Hoffman

    Seventeen years after the U.S. Department of Defense awarded Lockheed Martin the contract for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and 12 years after the first production aircraft flew in 2006, all versions of the plane remain far from combat-ready, or even fully operational. Recent concerns about cybersecurity have added to the project's woes, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and private pilot.

  • Fed. Circ. Case Steers Agencies Toward Commercial Vendors

    Nathaniel Castellano

    The Federal Circuit's decision last week in Palantir v. U.S. breathed new life into the government’s obligations to prioritize the acquisition of commercial and nondevelopmental solutions. It may prove to be one of the most significant procurement precedents of the decade, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter.

  • How A Hurricane Affects Gov't Contractors

    Joseph Berger

    During and immediately after a catastrophic event such as Hurricane Florence, government contractors must prioritize protection of lives and property. But the work of promptly identifying and documenting the hurricane’s effects on contract schedules and costs must not be forgotten or ignored, say attorneys with Thompson Hine LLP.