Life Sciences

  • April 28, 2017

    Atty Deception Kills Pharma Whistleblower Suit, Judge Rules

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Friday sanctioned a whistleblower’s attorneys for misconduct in a suit alleging false claims to Medicare by tossing the case, ruling that the complaint wouldn’t have survived the dismissal phase had it not relied on unethically sourced evidence.

  • April 28, 2017

    10th Circ. Backs Law School Lecture Penalty For Okla. Atty

    The Tenth Circuit on Friday affirmed an Oklahoma federal judge’s decision ordering a lawyer to give lectures at the University of Tulsa law school, finding that the lower court had properly found that he mishandled a lawsuit over unwanted sales calls he claimed came from a supplement company.

  • April 28, 2017

    Warning Would Have Kept Woman From J&J Talc, Jury Told

    A woman who alleges her daily use of Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products over decades caused her to develop ovarian tumors testified for a Missouri jury on Friday, saying she wouldn’t have used the company’s products had they included any warnings about cancer risks.

  • April 28, 2017

    11th Circ. Backs Georgia 'Pill Mill' Doc's 20-Year Sentence

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday upheld a 20-year sentence for a doctor charged with 92 federal counts arising from his participation in two Georgia pain management clinics that purportedly operated as “pill mills,” saying he failed to prove error in the trial court's handling of the case.

  • April 28, 2017

    Retrophin Waived Privilege Over Atty Docs, Shkreli Says

    Retrophin Inc.’s cooperation with the government in the criminal case against Martin Shkreli and the company’s separate action against its former CEO amounts to a “wholesale waiver” of privilege over communications key to Shkreli’s defense, his attorneys told a New York federal court.

  • April 28, 2017

    6 Cos. Price IPOs Totaling $1B To Conclude Flurry Of Deals

    Six companies raised nearly $1 billion from initial public offerings late Thursday in a blitz of deals capping a busy week, including technology “unicorn” Cloudera Inc., which raised $225 million after pricing above range and promptly saw its shares rally in debut trading Friday.

  • April 28, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Paytm, M1, BASF

    Indian mobile payment platform Paytm has received a $1.87 billion investment from SoftBank, multiple suitors have placed bids for Singaporean wireless operator M1 and BASF will not pursue an acquisition of Akzo Nobel's chemical business.

  • April 28, 2017

    Brand Battles: Google, Instagram, Bayer, 'Mad Men'

    In Law360’s latest roundup of new actions at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, Google responds to threats of litigation with a cancellation proceeding against what it says is a generic cloud computing term, Instagram faces a hurdle to registering its new neon logo, Bayer says its rights to "Claritin" are nothing to sneeze at, and Lions Gate takes action over a "Mad Men" barbershop.

  • April 28, 2017

    5 Firms Set To Launch May With 6 IPOs Surpassing $1.7B

    Five firms will steer six initial public offerings projected to raise more than $1.7 billion during the first week of May, including two energy issuers, three biotech companies and a private equity-backed real estate finance company, extending the IPO market's second-quarter momentum.

  • April 28, 2017

    New Allergan Fat-Freezing Unit Hit With False Ad Suit

    A recently acquired Allergan PLC unit is capitalizing on a confusing element of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s marketing process to trick customers into thinking its fat-freezing system has the agency’s approval, according to a proposed class action in California on Thursday.

  • April 28, 2017

    Senators Revive Bill To Speed Up Generic Drug Approval

    A bipartisan group of U.S. senators on Thursday revived the CREATES Act, a bill aimed at lowering drug prices by streamlining the process to get generic drugs on the market.

  • April 28, 2017

    Judge OKs Med Device Injury Claim Under Pa. Tort Law Ruling

    A federal judge on Thursday greenlighted claims against Stryker Corp. over an allegedly faulty bone implant after finding that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s overhaul of products liability law in the state more than two years ago did not bar strict liability claims against medical device manufacturers.

  • April 28, 2017

    Taxation With Representation: Skadden, Wachtell, Allen

    In this week’s Taxation With Representation, medical supply company Becton Dickinson buys out competitor C.R. Bard for $24 billion, Allen & Overy and Cravath guide a $4.3 billion acquisition in the pharmaceutical industry, and a merger creates a lodging REIT heavyweight with a $4.2 billion market capitalization in Maryland.

  • April 28, 2017

    Galena Biopharma Investor Claims Stock Votes Miscounted

    An investor in Galena Biopharma Inc. launched a putative class action in the Delaware Chancery Court late Thursday, claiming that at two shareholder meetings, the company improperly counted stockholder votes and then went ahead as if its proposals had passed when they actually didn’t.

  • April 28, 2017

    Health Hires: 8 Firms Add Health, Life Sciences Experts

    The last few weeks have seen Cooley LLP, DLA Piper, Faegre Baker Daniels Consulting, Fox Rothschild LLP, King & Spalding LLP, Nossaman LLP, Polsinelli PC and Porzio Bromberg & Newman PC expand their expertise in the health and life sciences worlds.

  • April 28, 2017

    J&J Hit With $20M Pelvic Mesh Verdict In Philly

    A Pennsylvania state jury hit Johnson & Johnson on Friday with a $20 million verdict over injuries suffered by a New Jersey woman after receiving a vaginal mesh implant, the third consecutive eight-figure award against Johnson & Johnson in the pelvic mesh mass tort program in Philadelphia County court.

  • April 28, 2017

    Aventis Says K&L Gates Fee Bid Survives High Court Ruling

    Sanofi-Aventis told a federal judge in California on Thursday that its demand for fees from generic-drug maker Amphastar and an ex-K&L Gates LLP attorney for allegedly withholding documents is perfectly consistent with the Supreme Court’s recent decision setting boundaries on litigation sanctions.

  • April 27, 2017

    FDA Approves Batten Disease Treatment Priced At $702K

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved Brineura, BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc.’s treatment for an ultra-rare type of Batten disease, which will reportedly cost about $702,000 per year.

  • April 27, 2017

    Investors Want Venture Funds Kept Out Of Theranos Suit

    Investors who purchased Theranos Inc. stocks through venture funds on Wednesday urged a California federal court not to rope the funds into the litigation, arguing there’s no risk of double recovery and that the securities fraud lawsuit won’t be hindered without their presence.

  • April 27, 2017

    Generic Drug Patent Cases Fell By One-Third In 2016: Report

    The number of patent suits over generic drugs filed in 2016 dropped by 32.5 percent over the previous year, according to a report released on Thursday by Lex Machina, a decline that an attorney says may be due to the rise of inter partes reviews and other factors.

Expert Analysis

  • Why Medical Marijuana Delivery May Soon Be Legal In LA

    Michael Rosenblum

    California has authorized licensed dispensaries to deliver medical marijuana to qualified patients, but allows municipalities to ban such deliveries. San Jose and other cities have recently lifted their delivery prohibitions. Los Angeles retains its ban, but a recently passed ballot measure and shifting public sentiment suggest that this may change in the coming months, says Michael Rosenblum of Thompson Coburn LLP.

  • The Mediator’s Proposal As A Tool For Litigants

    Dennis Klein

    Mediators’ proposals, which call for an unconditional and confidential acceptance or rejection, are resolving high-value disputes on a regular basis. Dennis Klein of Critical Matter Mediation examines why this is happening and the tactical implications for litigants in anticipating that a mediator’s proposal could resolve litigation.

  • Justices Struggle With BPCIA Enigma

    Tasha Francis

    Amgen v. Sandoz is the U.S. Supreme Court's first opportunity to weigh in on the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act. At oral argument on Wednesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s role in interpreting and applying the BPCIA provisions took center stage, say Tasha Francis and Jenny Shmuel of Fish & Richardson PC.

  • Expectations After The Trump Administration's First 100 Days

    Jim Flood

    In its first 100 days, the Trump administration has had mixed results and may be behind where it wants to be. The biggest threat to President Donald Trump’s domestic policy agenda beyond the first 100 days is the difficulty of reconciling the Freedom Caucus Republicans, moderate Republicans and Democrats, say Jim Flood and Cari Stinebower of Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • Addressing Personal Jurisdiction Limits At The High Court

    Grant Esposito

    State court decisions in Bristol-Myers Squibb v. Superior Court of California and BNSF Railway v. Tyrrell both adopted an expansive view of personal jurisdiction that is seemingly at odds with the U.S. Supreme Court’s efforts to cabin that doctrine. If the recent oral arguments before the Supreme Court in these cases are any indication, the state courts will probably lose again, say attorneys with Morrison & Foerster LLP.

  • UK Product Liability Law Moves Toward US Norms

    Marilyn Moberg

    Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis litigation is still in its infancy in the United Kingdom, but a landmark English High Court decision in one such case adopts many of the product liability doctrines and principles that apply in the U.S. This is welcome news for manufacturers who sell medical products in the U.K., say Marilyn Moberg and Kathryn Bond of Reed Smith LLP.

  • Thinking Fast And Slow About Class Action Reform

    Michael Donovan

    Corporate interests lobbying for H.R. 985, the anti-class action bill recently passed by the U.S. House of Representatives, are the same ones that pushed the Class Action Fairness Act in 2005. That law caused most significant class actions to migrate to federal courts. Ironically, the new bill could return many class actions to state courts, says Michael Donovan of Donovan Litigation Group LLC.

  • 'Milking' The 1st Amendment To Defend Food Label Claims

    Andre Timothy Hanson

    The Eleventh Circuit's decision in Ocheesee Creamery v. Putnam could have potentially significant ramifications for the labeling and advertising of foods and pharmaceuticals. The opinion shows that it may be time for companies to more aggressively defend their First Amendment rights, say Andre Timothy Hanson and Saul Howard Perloff of Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP.

  • The 9-Year Winning Streak Of Virginia ‘Rocket Docket’

    Bob Tata

    Out of 94 district courts, the Eastern District of Virginia has been the fastest civil trial docket in the country for nine straight years. Without micromanaging the process, the EDVA's judges, magistrate judges, and clerks and staff continue to perform at a stunningly efficient level, says Bob Tata of Hunton & Williams LLP.

  • Scott Gottlieb And The Future Of The FDA

    Kristi Wolff

    The Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions recently held a hearing on the nomination of Scott Gottlieb to be the next commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. His comments on FDA policy issues including drug pricing and approvals, food safety and labeling, and the tobacco “deeming” rule offer guidance on the future of the agency, say attorneys from Kelley Drye & Warren LLP.