Telecommunications

  • November 25, 2020

    Wells Fargo Loses PTAB Challenge Over Check Deposit IP

    Two United Services Automobile Association mobile check deposit patents have escaped Patent Trial and Appeal Board review unscathed after a determination that challenger Wells Fargo, which a jury said should pay $200 million for infringing one of the patents and a separate patent, didn't show the claims were obvious.

  • November 25, 2020

    What To Watch As High Court Takes On Computer Crime Law

    A computer crime law whose scope has been hotly debated since it was passed in 1984 will be in the limelight Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court considers whether a Georgia police officer violated federal law by abusing his access to an online government database. Here's a breakdown of three key questions that may arise and could decide where the court ultimately comes down.

  • November 25, 2020

    Notice Dispute Can't Block TV Co. From Malpractice Coverage

    A D.C. federal judge on Tuesday handed a partial win to a TV station fighting for insurance coverage of underlying malpractice claims, ruling that the company may be able to go after its lawyer's onetime insurer for damages even if the attorney ran afoul of notification requirements under the insurance policy.

  • November 25, 2020

    Sen. Presses Twitter, Facebook On 'Coordinated Censorship'

    Republican Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., submitted additional questions to Facebook and Twitter regarding their practices of content moderation and user data tracking, after he grilled the CEOs of both companies when they spoke before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week.

  • November 25, 2020

    FCC Won't Reverse Move Labeling ZTE As Nat'l Security Risk

    The Federal Communications Commission held to its designation of Chinese telecom ZTE as a national security threat and its decision to deny federal funds to telecom companies that use its equipment, saying the company hasn't taken solid steps to reduce risks to U.S. networks.

  • November 25, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Ahead of the long weekend, when Americans are most known for gathering and traveling, Thanksgiving-minded governors laid down more restrictions as COVID-19 cases continued surging over the past week.

  • November 25, 2020

    Media, Energy-Focused SPACs Raise $561M In Market Debuts

    Two blank-check companies, one led by former Disney executives and the other backed by Apollo Global Management, started trading Wednesday after raising a combined $561 million in initial public offerings.

  • November 25, 2020

    Intuit Will Ditch Credit Karma Tax Biz To Save $7.1B Deal

    Intuit will have to sell off Credit Karma's tax business to win the U.S. Department of Justice's blessing for its $7.1 billion acquisition of the credit reporting upstart, the agency revealed Wednesday.

  • November 24, 2020

    AT&T Hit With Lawsuit Over Long-Dead 'Cingular' Trademark

    After a loss at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board earlier this year, a company that wants to revive the brand name "Cingular" is suing AT&T Inc. for "deliberately obstructing" its right to reuse the old name.

  • November 24, 2020

    Apple Tells Fed. Circ. To Undo WiLAN's $85M Patent Win

    Apple has urged the Federal Circuit to overturn an $85 million verdict against it for infringing WiLAN's patented wireless technology, saying that the licensing firm has been "stretching its patents" and otherwise "overreaching" at every stage in the case.

  • November 24, 2020

    4 Firms Steer TransDigm's $965M Deal For Aerospace Biz

    Aerospace company TransDigm said Tuesday it will buy U.K.-based antenna and radio business Cobham Aero Connectivity in a roughly $965 million deal steered by BakerHostetler, Reed Smith, Jones Day and Weil Gotshal.

  • November 24, 2020

    Defense Committees Told To Stay Wary Of Ligado Interference

    Congress shouldn't remove a set of provisions from the U.S. Department of Defense's budget aimed at shoring up the effects of the Federal Communications Commission's decision to let Ligado Networks build out a mobile network next to airwaves used by the military, industry heavyweights say.

  • November 24, 2020

    Kansas Atty Suspended After Copping To Role In Cyberattacks

    Oklahoma's highest state court on Tuesday suspended for over two years a Kansas personal injury lawyer who pled guilty last year to knowing about cyberattacks waged on his behalf against Leagle.com and others.

  • November 24, 2020

    Networks Say Looser Ownership Rules Could Save Broadcast

    The U.S. Supreme Court must not seal a bleak future for TV networks by maintaining Federal Communications Commission ownership restrictions that prevent local stations from combining, major broadcasters wrote in amicus briefs filed Monday.

  • November 24, 2020

    Swiss Electronics Co. Seeks Subpoena For ICC Arbitration

    A Swiss electronics maker has asked a California judge to let it subpoena a U.S. telecommunications company for information it wants to use in a confidential arbitration proceeding before the International Chamber of Commerce.

  • November 24, 2020

    FTC's Zoom Deal Signals New Data Security Plan Under Dems

    The Federal Trade Commission's two Democrats offered a detailed strategy for boosting the agency's data security and privacy enforcement approach in an objection to a recent nonmonetary settlement against Zoom, laying out a plan that could soon come to fruition as their party readies to take the helm of the agency next year.

  • November 24, 2020

    Dish, Altice Sued Over Infringing Network Patents

    Dish and Altice are accused of infringing patents issued in the early 2000s with smart devices that use technology to reduce antenna interference and synchronize communication systems, according to a flurry of lawsuits leveled in a Texas federal court this week.

  • November 24, 2020

    FCC Finds Verizon Paid 'Unjust' Pole Attachment Charges

    The Federal Communications Commission has found that an electric utility company that operates in Maryland made Verizon pay unreasonable charges for attachments on their utility poles and handed down a maximum rate the utility company could charge the telecom giant.

  • November 24, 2020

    GOP Reps. Seek GAO Audit Of Ag Dept. Rural Broadband Pilot

    Nearly a dozen House Republicans have asked the Government Accountability Office to probe the operations of a pilot program run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fund rural broadband projects, saying they worry millions of dollars are going to waste.

  • November 24, 2020

    Trump Campaign Rally Auto-Text TCPA Suit Tossed

    A federal judge has dismissed a proposed class action accusing President Donald Trump's reelection campaign of sending unsolicited text messages using an autodialer, more than two weeks after Minnesota residents and the company that handles most of the president's political ads reached a stipulation to end the case.

  • November 23, 2020

    FCC Again Rejects Bidding Credits For Telecoms Tied To Dish

    The Federal Communications Commission on Monday again turned down requests from two telecoms for bidding credits available to "very small" businesses under a spectrum auction because the agency determined the companies are effectively controlled by Dish Corp., their main investor.

  • November 23, 2020

    NHTSA Eyes New Self-Driving Car Regulatory Framework

    The U.S. Department of Transportation has signaled that it may eventually adopt new safety standards for vehicles with automated driving systems, taking a big step that could boost development of passenger-carrying autonomous vehicles while ensuring that new technologies still undergo sharp scrutiny.

  • November 23, 2020

    Lawmakers Urge FCC To Initiate 'Rip And Replace' Effort

    A bipartisan pair of U.S. House members urged the FCC on Monday to start rolling out a congressionally mandated plan to pay internet providers for the replacement of network equipment that could pose national security risks.

  • November 23, 2020

    Volkswagen Knocks Out 2 Cellular Network Patents At PTAB

    Volkswagen has notched a pair of victories at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, which has invalidated claims in two Carucel Investments LP patents covering a mobile communications system after finding them obvious in light of earlier patents.

  • November 23, 2020

    Comcast Gets Technician's Age Bias Suit Sent To Arbitration

    An Illinois federal judge ruled Monday that a former Comcast network technician must arbitrate an age bias suit claiming he was hit with bogus misconduct allegations and then fired, unswayed by his argument that he did not recall entering an arbitration pact with Comcast.

Expert Analysis

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

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    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • When It Comes To SEPs, Act Locally But Enforce Globally

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    Because recent standard-essential patent decisions in the U.S., the U.K., China and Germany may signal a trend toward a greater international influence on global royalty rates by individual national jurisdictions, potential licensors and licensees may need to adjust their enforcement strategies, says Mauricio Uribe at Knobbe Martens.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

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    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Expect Major Changes In Aerospace And Defense Under Biden

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    President-elect Joe Biden is expected to significantly shift aerospace and defense industry priorities, revoke certain Trump administration government contractor policies, strengthen "Buy American" requirements, and increase use of defense and NASA budgetary authority to combat climate change, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

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    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

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    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Beware Atty Ethics Rules When Reporting COVID-19 Fraud

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    Attorneys considering blowing the whistle on False Claims Act violations by recipients of COVID-19 relief may face a number of ethical constraints on their ability to disclose client information and file qui tam actions, say Breon Peace and Jennifer Kennedy Park at Cleary.

  • Looking For Judicial Activists? Check The Footnotes

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    U.S. Supreme Court nominees typically face intense questioning over potential judicial activism, but a better way to gauge judges' activist tendencies may be to look at the footnotes in their opinions, say Christopher Collier at Hawkins Parnell and Michael Arndt at Rohan Law.

  • Best Practices For Legal Technology Adoption

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    The pandemic has accelerated the need to improve the practice of law through technology, but law firms and in-house legal departments must first ensure they have employee buy-in and well-defined processes for new digital tools, say Dan Broderick at BlackBoiler and Daryl Shetterly at Orrick.

  • Opinion

    FTC Exceeded Its Authority In Zoom Cybersecurity Settlement

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    In light of the Federal Trade Commission's requirement, in excess of its statutory authority, that Zoom overhaul its data security as part of a recent deceptive practices settlement, companies shouldn't assent to unfounded relief even when challenging the agency could result in costly litigation, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • The Pandemic's Long-Term Impact On Law Firm Operations

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    Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey looks at how pandemic-era remote work has changed the way law firms operate — from shifts in secretarial functions to associate professional development — and explains why some alterations may be here to stay.

  • Treasury Stance On Ransomware Payment Could Hurt Targets

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    Recent statements from two U.S. Department of the Treasury offices indicate that paying off ransomware with cryptocurrency may trigger certain registration requirements and U.S. sanctions scrutiny, placing a significant regulatory burden on cybervictims and their incident response consultants, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Opinion

    Lack Of Access To Remote Court Proceedings Is Inexcusable

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    Blanket rules that bar recording or dissemination of remote public court proceedings impede presumptive common law and First Amendment right of access, greatly expand courts' powers over nonparties, and likely run afoul of U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Matthew Schafer at ViacomCBS.

  • OFAC Cyber Ransom Guidance Has Insurance Implications

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    A new advisory from the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control will likely cause delay in insurance coverage determinations for ransom payments, but there are steps policyholders can take to secure coverage for restoration costs when a ransom is not paid, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Opinion

    Why Attacks On Trump's Election Lawyers Are Problematic

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    The vilification of Jones Day and Porter Wright for their involvement in President Donald Trump's election lawsuits is an attack on lawyers' duty to advocate for their clients' causes fearlessly and zealously within the bounds of the law, says Pierce O'Donnell at Greenberg Glusker.

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