Environmental

  • October 05, 2022

    Bankrupt Mining Co.'s Receiver Can't Keep Mining W.Va. Site

    A West Virginia federal judge blocked the receiver of a bankrupt mining company from surface mining on one of its predecessors' sites as part of its reclamation plan, ruling on Wednesday that the work is not "necessary and incidental to reclamation" as required by a 2016 decree.

  • October 05, 2022

    Shipping Cos. Want Ga. County's Oil Spill Suit Tossed

    Hyundai's logistics arm and two other shipping companies urged a Georgia federal judge to toss a suit blaming them for an oil spill that contaminated natural resources and tourist hot spots, arguing the claims are overreaching.

  • October 05, 2022

    Wash. Cement Co. Inks $537K Deal In Illegal Dumping Suit

    One of North America's largest cement producers will pay more than half a million dollars, most of which will go toward environmental cleanup, to end a lawsuit in which it was accused of dumping toxic waste into a Washington state river that empties into the Puget Sound, near Seattle.

  • October 05, 2022

    MDL Panel Denies Bid To Centralize Irrigation Litigation

    The U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has rejected a bid by the Klamath Irrigation District to centralize seven suits, currently in California and Oregon federal courts, over the use of water from the federal Klamath Project, which provides irrigation water in southern Oregon.

  • October 05, 2022

    DOI Launches New Rules For Policing Of Tribes And Parks

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it is implementing new rules to promote safe and accountable policing practices for law enforcement agents at the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service.

  • October 05, 2022

    EPA Eases Regulatory Path For Electric Vehicle Chemicals

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday said it's streamlining the process to approve new chemicals that can be used in batteries, electric vehicles, semiconductors and renewable energy generation.

  • October 05, 2022

    Chippewa Tribe Slams Enbridge Over Bid To Exclude Experts

    Tribal leaders in Wisconsin are defending a group of energy and transportation experts who they say help illustrate that a major oil and gas pipeline on their reservation is expendable, and berating the pipeline owner, Enbridge Energy Co., for an "ill-conceived" bid to preclude their testimony.

  • October 05, 2022

    2 Firms Seek OK Of $1.8M Fee In Pipeline Suit Deal Redo

    Halloran Farkas + Kittila and Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz continue to urge the Delaware Chancery Court to approve a $1.8 million fee as part of a deal to end litigation over a 2015 California oil spill, after being asked to provide more details justifying the request.

  • October 04, 2022

    Dow, PPG Cleanup Trial Stalls Over City's Expert Disclosure

    A California judge delayed trial and refused Tuesday to let the city of Modesto call a vapor expert out of order in its case over claims Dow Chemical and PPG Industries must cover the city's dry-cleaning chemicals cleanup costs, agreeing with the companies that the change was disclosed too late.

  • October 04, 2022

    Colo. Panel Tries To Untangle Emissions Rule Deadlines

    A panel of Colorado appellate judges grappled Tuesday with what state lawmakers expected of regulators when they passed a pair of greenhouse gas reduction bills in 2019 with differing timelines, leading one jurist to grill an environmental attorney on why legislators passed two measures in the first place.

  • October 04, 2022

    DC Circ. Questions States' Standing In Water Standards Case

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday challenged a group of states' standing to sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for delaying a rule limiting copper and lead in drinking water, questioning the states' argument that being directly affected by the delay was enough to allow a suit.

  • October 04, 2022

    Tribes Say DOI Botched Superfund Land Swap Approval

    The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes have urged an Idaho federal judge to grant them a quick win in their suit challenging a U.S. Department of the Interior-approved land transfer to expand a plant at a Superfund site near tribal land, saying the DOI's review gave short shrift to the Tribes' treaty rights, environmental justice and several federal laws.

  • October 04, 2022

    Ian Renews Calls For Better Building, Flood Management

    Hurricane Ian's devastating effects across southwest Florida have renewed calls for stronger building codes and resiliency measures that could allow households to better withstand natural disasters and avoid frequently uninsured damages like flooding.

  • October 04, 2022

    Michigan Officials Dodge Felonies Over Flint Conduct

    A Michigan state judge on Tuesday tossed charges against seven current and former state and local officials who were accused of criminal misconduct through their roles in the Flint lead-tainted drinking water crisis.

  • October 04, 2022

    Cummins Inks $3.9M Deal To End Dodge Ram Defect Suit

    Dodge Ram drivers have reached a $3.9 million deal with Cummins Inc. to end claims that the engine maker knew it had provided defective diesel engines to Fiat Chrysler that were then outfitted in their trucks, according to new filings in Michigan federal court.

  • October 04, 2022

    Wilson Sonsini Guides Aquaron Acquisition SPAC In $50M IPO

    Guided by Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC, blank-check company Aquaron Acquisition Corp. began trading on the Nasdaq Tuesday after raising $50 million in its initial public offering by selling 5 million units at $10 per share.

  • October 04, 2022

    Georgia-Pacific Sued Over Wash. Paper Mill Cleanup

    Georgia-Pacific LLC should be responsible for environmental cleanup at a Washington paper mill that was sold more than three decades ago, Nippon Paper Industries USA said in a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Washington federal court, accusing the fellow papermaker of violating an asset purchase agreement for the mill.

  • October 04, 2022

    Feds Fight Delay Of Cherokee Trust Audit Ruling

    The federal government has urged a D.C. federal judge to block the Cherokee Nation's request for a full audit of tribal funds held in federal trust, saying the tribe's request for additional information fails to identify which facts are still needed.

  • October 04, 2022

    Fla. Condo's Multimillion Irma Bad Faith Suit Stays Alive

    A Florida condo association can continue with its bad-faith suit against an AIG unit over coverage for millions of dollars of damage from Hurricane Irma, a Florida judge decided Tuesday.

  • October 04, 2022

    EPA Admits It Didn't Consider Studies In Fungicide Approval

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Monday it failed to consider relevant human health and wildlife studies when it approved a fungicide, asking the Ninth Circuit for a chance to withdraw the decision itself.

  • October 04, 2022

    V&E Loses Ace Tax Atty To Kirkland In Houston

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP has added a partner with a broad range of expertise in tax controversy to its Houston office.

  • October 04, 2022

    Conservationists Say Miami Water Park Threatens Habitat

    Two conservation groups and a resident argued Tuesday that Miami-Dade County breached a voter referendum with its June decision to allow a developer to build a hotel and water park on land that's home to a series of endangered species and rare plants.

  • October 04, 2022

    Davis Wright Tremaine Adds Ex-FERC, Stinson Atty

    An energy attorney who spent the past 12 years with Stinson LLP and has prior experience working for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, has moved to Davis Wright Tremaine LLP's Washington, D.C. office, the firm announced Monday.

  • October 03, 2022

    Dow, PPG Owe For Modesto Site Contamination, Jury Told

    The city of Modesto told a California jury Monday during opening statements that Dow Chemical Co. and PPG Industries Inc. offered negligent safety standards for decades on how to handle a chemical now known to be toxic that resulted in dangerous contamination of the ground at a former dry cleaning site.

  • October 03, 2022

    Sterigenics Fights Ga. County Over Sterilization Plant Closure

    Sterigenics U.S. LLC and the Georgia county in which the company has operated a medical sterilization plant for 50 years have sought opposing rulings from a Georgia federal court over whether the county was authorized to shut down the facility in 2019 amid widespread public concern about ethylene oxide emissions.

Expert Analysis

  • Limiting The Scope Of Representation Is Critical For Lawyers

    Author Photo

    A Mississippi federal court's recent decision in Kee v. Howard L. Nations PC highlights the importance of well-written engagement letters, and shows why it is vital for attorneys to specify exactly which services they intend to supply, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • What EPA's Interim PFAS Standards Mean For Water Suppliers

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recent announcement of significantly lower interim health advisory levels for four per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances may mean new obligations for municipal water and wastewater treatment plant operators — but the availability of public funds for controlling PFAS threats is good news, say Timothy Bergère and Zach Beach at Armstrong Teasdale.

  • How Cos. Can Prep For Calif. Ban On PFAS In Food Packaging

    Author Photo

    California’s ban on a group of chemicals known as PFAS is three months away, meaning food packaging and cookware manufacturers have little time to implement the big changes this law requires, lest they face enforcement actions such as injunctive relief and steep civil penalties, say John Epperson and Peter McGaw at Buchalter.

  • Attys Shouldn't Assume Judicial Critique Is Protected Speech

    Author Photo

    As it becomes more commonplace to see criticism of the judiciary in the media, licensed attorneys are well advised to remember that they may have less freedom than nonlawyers to make protected speech critical of the judiciary, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • EPA's Permitting FAQ Goes Beyond The Letter Of The Law

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recent guidance on environmental justice and civil rights in permitting has no legally binding effect, but the question is whether it will have a coercive effect — and if so, to what degree regulatory authorities will feel pressured to adopt the agency's recommendations, say Karen Bennett and Cameron Dorais at Lewis Brisbois.

  • 13 Cognitive Distortions That Plague Defense Witnesses

    Author Photo

    In civil litigation, witnesses exhibiting negative thought patterns can spell trouble — so defense counsel should familiarize themselves with the most common cognitive distortions that can cripple their witnesses' testimony, and try to intervene to help reframe their perceptions, say Bill Kanasky Jr. and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • How Crypto Miners Can Support A Cleaner Energy System

    Author Photo

    While cryptocurrency mining uses enormous amounts of energy, the industry is aware of the need to reduce its carbon footprint — and positive practices such as decarbonizing power grids and supporting dispatchable supply can allow it to do so, say Dennis Elsenbeck and David Flynn at Phillips Lytle.

  • EPA Microfiber Pollution Report Sets Stage For Regulation

    Author Photo

    A new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency draft report that cites the textile and fashion industries as the leading sources of microfiber pollution may lay the groundwork for future regulation, making it increasingly important for companies to monitor how the government defines and handles microfibers, say Byron Brown and Preetha Chakrabarti at Crowell & Moring.

  • Series

    Keys To A 9-0 High Court Win: Practicality Over Perfection

    Author Photo

    When I argued for the petitioner in Wooden v. U.S. last year, I discovered that preparation is key, but so is the right kind of preparation — in giving decisive answers to the U.S. Supreme Court justices' hypothetical questions I was not aiming for perfection, just the best response available, says Allon Kedem at Arnold & Porter.

  • 5 Considerations When Seeking Federal EV Funding

    Author Photo

    A recent White House fact sheet shows how federal efforts to support the full scope of the electric vehicle industry have moved the needle, but some details about how to use those funds are still being ironed out, and there are a few issues to watch, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • What New Bar Exam Means For Law Students And Schools

    Author Photo

    Stephanie Acosta at UWorld discusses how law students and law schools can start preparing now for the new bar exam launching in 2026, which is expected to emphasize real-world lawyering skills-based tasks over rote memorization.

  • Apple's New Messaging Features Will Complicate E-Discovery

    Author Photo

    Apple's newest mobile operating system allows users to edit and recall messages and recover deleted messages, which could significantly increase the time, burden and expense of processing and analyzing cellphones if messages or their associated metadata become an area of scrutiny in a case, says Jarrett Coco at Nelson Mullins.

  • Civil Suit Trends Cos. Can Expect From State AG Enforcement

    Author Photo

    Companies can prepare for possible future claims from private plaintiffs and manage litigation risks by understanding the priorities and enforcement trends of state attorneys general — from greenwashing to missed commitments on diversity, equity and inclusion, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Law Firm Inclusion Efforts Often Overlook Business Staff

    Author Photo

    Law firms committed to a culture of universal inclusion can take steps to foster a sense of belonging in their business services teams, says Jennifer Johnson at Calibrate Consulting.

  • EPA Guidance Signals Greater Enviro Justice Focus In Permits

    Author Photo

    A list of frequently asked questions recently released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emphasizes environmental justice and civil rights considerations in permitting for a wide range of commercial activities across many industries, and is likely to reverberate loudly in environmental permitting for years to come, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!