Technology

  • November 25, 2020

    Facebook, Twitter Sued Over IP Used To Quash COVID-19 Lies

    Many of the core functions of Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat, like targeted advertising, notifications and even tools used for flagging fake COVID-19 news, are infringing patents owned by a Xerox subsidiary, the company said Wednesday in three suits filed in California federal court.

  • November 25, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Backs PTAB Win For Twitter On Video Patent

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday upheld the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's invalidation of a VidStream social media patent, rejecting the patentee's argument that Twitter had not proven that the book that rendered the patent obvious was available to the public.

  • November 25, 2020

    Texas A&M Sued After Supervisor's Restroom Spying Arrest

    A Texas A&M employee has sued the university and her former supervisor, who was arrested on suspicion of secretly recording women using the restroom, claiming her employer did not stop him from sexually harassing her or properly investigate the incident.

  • November 25, 2020

    EU Floats IP Plan, Eyes Standard-Essential Patents

    The European Union is going to take new steps to overhaul intellectual property law in an effort to "reduce frictions" and litigation over standard-essential patents in the tech sector, the bloc's top antitrust and digital technology official announced.

  • November 25, 2020

    Wells Fargo Loses PTAB Challenge Over Check Deposit IP

    Two United Services Automobile Association mobile check deposit patents have escaped Patent Trial and Appeal Board review unscathed after a determination that challenger Wells Fargo, which a jury said should pay $200 million for infringing one of the patents and a separate patent, didn't show the claims were obvious.

  • November 25, 2020

    What To Watch As High Court Takes On Computer Crime Law

    A computer crime law whose scope has been hotly debated since it was passed in 1984 will be in the limelight Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court considers whether a Georgia police officer violated federal law by abusing his access to an online government database. Here's a breakdown of three key questions that may arise and could decide where the court ultimately comes down.

  • November 25, 2020

    Sen. Presses Twitter, Facebook On 'Coordinated Censorship'

    Republican Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., submitted additional questions to Facebook and Twitter regarding their practices of content moderation and user data tracking, after he grilled the CEOs of both companies when they spoke before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week.

  • November 25, 2020

    GAO Says $75M DOD Health IT Support Deal Was Fair

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office denied a protest over a $75.3 million Defense Health Agency program management deal, saying the awardee wasn't advantaged by access to the protester's personnel information, much of which was public on LinkedIn anyway.

  • November 25, 2020

    Microsoft Unit Targeted In Food Delivery App Fight Doc Bid

    A Microsoft unit that provides hosting for software development is being targeted by a Luxembourg company for information to help it fend off arbitration initiated by the founder of Hungerstation, Saudi Arabia's largest food delivery app, over control of the company.

  • November 25, 2020

    Facebook's $650M Biometric Privacy Deal Draws 1.5M Users

    More than 1.5 million Illinois Facebook users are seeking to claim a share of a proposed $650 million deal to resolve biometric privacy claims brought against the social media company in California federal court, according to a Wednesday filing by counsel for the parties, who had previously said that roughly 6 million consumers were eligible to participate in the settlement.

  • November 25, 2020

    Apple Says Skin Tones Used In Emojis Can't Be IP

    Apple Inc. is urging a Texas federal judge to kill a copyright infringement lawsuit over its emojis with diverse skin tones, contending the company suing it can't claim rights to "naturally occurring" human characteristics like skin color.

  • November 25, 2020

    Goodwin Steers Mass Spectrometry Biz Eyeing $75M IPO

    Mass spectrometry company 908 Devices on Wednesday filed for an initial public offering guided by Goodwin Procter LLP that is preliminarily estimated to bring in about $75 million.

  • November 25, 2020

    FCC Won't Reverse Move Labeling ZTE As Nat'l Security Risk

    The Federal Communications Commission held to its designation of Chinese telecom ZTE as a national security threat and its decision to deny federal funds to telecom companies that use its equipment, saying the company hasn't taken solid steps to reduce risks to U.S. networks.

  • November 25, 2020

    Media, Energy-Focused SPACs Raise $561M In Market Debuts

    Two blank-check companies, one led by former Disney executives and the other backed by Apollo Global Management, started trading Wednesday after raising a combined $561 million in initial public offerings.

  • November 24, 2020

    SAIC Beats Fired Male Worker's Sexual Harassment Suit

    A Virginia federal judge shut down a sex discrimination lawsuit brought by a fired Science Applications International Corp. communications adviser who alleged a female supervisor sexually harassed him, noting Tuesday that "general unfairness" isn't against the law.

  • November 24, 2020

    AT&T Hit With Lawsuit Over Long-Dead 'Cingular' Trademark

    After a loss at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board earlier this year, a company that wants to revive the brand name "Cingular" is suing AT&T Inc. for "deliberately obstructing" its right to reuse the old name.

  • November 24, 2020

    Don't Validate Price-Gouging Rules, Egg Co-Op Tells 6th Circ.

    United Egg Producers Inc. has urged the Sixth Circuit to ignore a bid by 30 attorneys general for a broad declaration that price gouging prohibitions are always a valid exercise of state policing powers, particularly during emergencies such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

  • November 24, 2020

    Apple Tells Fed. Circ. To Undo WiLAN's $85M Patent Win

    Apple has urged the Federal Circuit to overturn an $85 million verdict against it for infringing WiLAN's patented wireless technology, saying that the licensing firm has been "stretching its patents" and otherwise "overreaching" at every stage in the case.

  • November 24, 2020

    4 Firms Steer TransDigm's $965M Deal For Aerospace Biz

    Aerospace company TransDigm said Tuesday it will buy U.K.-based antenna and radio business Cobham Aero Connectivity in a roughly $965 million deal steered by BakerHostetler, Reed Smith, Jones Day and Weil Gotshal.

  • November 24, 2020

    Defense Committees Told To Stay Wary Of Ligado Interference

    Congress shouldn't remove a set of provisions from the U.S. Department of Defense's budget aimed at shoring up the effects of the Federal Communications Commission's decision to let Ligado Networks build out a mobile network next to airwaves used by the military, industry heavyweights say.

  • November 24, 2020

    Debevoise Guides Russian E-Commerce Firm's Near-$1B IPO

    Russian e-commerce platform Ozon Holdings PLC went public Tuesday after raising nearly $1 billion in an upsized initial public offering, steered by Debevoise & Plimpton LLP and underwriters counsel Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • November 24, 2020

    Top EU Court Says Hotel Can Sue Over Booking.com Policies

    The European Court of Justice on Tuesday gave a German hotel the go-ahead to sue Booking.com in the establishment's home country for allegedly violating German laws against abuse of market dominance rather than requiring the case to play out in Holland, where the reservation site is headquartered.

  • November 24, 2020

    Kansas Atty Suspended After Copping To Role In Cyberattacks

    Oklahoma's highest state court on Tuesday suspended for over two years a Kansas personal injury lawyer who pled guilty last year to knowing about cyberattacks waged on his behalf against Leagle.com and others.

  • November 24, 2020

    Networks Say Looser Ownership Rules Could Save Broadcast

    The U.S. Supreme Court must not seal a bleak future for TV networks by maintaining Federal Communications Commission ownership restrictions that prevent local stations from combining, major broadcasters wrote in amicus briefs filed Monday.

  • November 24, 2020

    Samsung Says Expert Ruined Batteries In Vape Explosion Suit

    A Samsung unit asked a Tennessee federal judge Tuesday to sanction a man who sued the company over an exploding battery, claiming his expert sawed open batteries that were going to be used in discovery before they could be safely tested.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    The Ill-Fated Emergence Of The Bitcoin Balance Sheet

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    Other corporations may follow MicroStrategy's lead and invest in problematic Bitcoin, in what appears to be a new chapter of irresponsible corporate behavior, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

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    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • 5 Tips For In-House Counsel Anticipating Cyber Class Actions

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    In light of a 270% increase in data breaches this year, and the attendant class actions, in-house counsel can prepare to efficiently manage litigation by focusing on certain initial steps, ranging from multidistrict litigation strategy to insurance best practices, say David McDowell and Nancy Thomas at MoFo.

  • When It Comes To SEPs, Act Locally But Enforce Globally

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    Because recent standard-essential patent decisions in the U.S., the U.K., China and Germany may signal a trend toward a greater international influence on global royalty rates by individual national jurisdictions, potential licensors and licensees may need to adjust their enforcement strategies, says Mauricio Uribe at Knobbe Martens.

  • 3 Fed. Circ. IP Cases For Gov't Contractors To Watch

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    Nathaniel Castellano at Arnold & Porter discusses recent oral arguments at the Federal Circuit in three cases — Boeing v. Secretary of the Air Force, Bitmanagement Software v. U.S. and Harmonia Holdings v. U.S. — and the broad implications the decisions will have on government contractors and agencies dealing in proprietary data and software.

  • Del. Solera D&O Decision May Have Limited Impact

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    While the Delaware Supreme Court's recent decision in Solera is a blow for companies in the state seeking protection for certain key appraisal proceedings, the ruling hinges on the insurers' narrow definition of a violation that will trigger directors and officers coverage for securities-related claims, making it unlikely that other jurisdictions will follow suit, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

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    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Expect Major Changes In Aerospace And Defense Under Biden

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    President-elect Joe Biden is expected to significantly shift aerospace and defense industry priorities, revoke certain Trump administration government contractor policies, strengthen "Buy American" requirements, and increase use of defense and NASA budgetary authority to combat climate change, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Avoiding Copyright Liability For Tattoo Depiction In Media

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    Two recent diverging copyright decisions concerning Take-Two video games' depiction of professional athletes' tattoos provide guidance on strategically using the implied license and fair use defenses when digital reproductions may infringe copyrighted tattoos, says Rowley Rice at Munger Tolles.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

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    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • 3rd Circ. Could Select Middle Path On Foreign Discovery Law

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    In a circuit split over whether a U.S. foreign discovery law may be used for private arbitration, the Third Circuit in Axion Holding Cyprus may choose a middle ground by finding that private arbitration under the U.K. Arbitration Act involves sufficient judicial oversight to make it subject to the statute, says Adrienne Koch at Katsky Korins.

  • Tech Cos. Could Face Stiffer SEC Enforcement Under Biden

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    Ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's appointment of a new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission chair, Silicon Valley should expect greater scrutiny of whistleblowers, earnings management, risk disclosures and insider trading — all potentially influenced by the federal courts in serving as a check on the agency's enforcement, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

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    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Beware Atty Ethics Rules When Reporting COVID-19 Fraud

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    Attorneys considering blowing the whistle on False Claims Act violations by recipients of COVID-19 relief may face a number of ethical constraints on their ability to disclose client information and file qui tam actions, say Breon Peace and Jennifer Kennedy Park at Cleary.

  • Looking For Judicial Activists? Check The Footnotes

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    U.S. Supreme Court nominees typically face intense questioning over potential judicial activism, but a better way to gauge judges' activist tendencies may be to look at the footnotes in their opinions, say Christopher Collier at Hawkins Parnell and Michael Arndt at Rohan Law.

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