White Collar

  • October 05, 2022

    NJ Man Sentenced For Defrauding Shipping Insurance Co.

    A former associate director for a London-based maritime shipping insurance claims servicer was sentenced to 27 months in prison after pleading guilty to embezzling from the company and dodging payroll taxes.

  • October 05, 2022

    Bank Investor Wants Maduro-Connected Board Members Out

    A majority shareholder of Florida's Eastern National Bank is seeking to oust board members with ties to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro who allegedly devised a self-enriching stock compensation plan, adding that the bank's operations could cease over $20 million in losses stemming from a U.S. government investigation.

  • October 05, 2022

    Rancher Gets 11 Years For $244M 'Ghost Cattle' Scam

    A Washington cattle rancher has been sentenced to 11 years in federal prison and to repay millions for defrauding Tyson Foods and another company out of more than $244 million by fabricating invoices for the costs of taking care of hundreds of thousands of cattle that didn't exist, according to a sentencing document.  

  • October 05, 2022

    BREAKING: Jury Convicts Ex-Uber Exec Of Obstruction Over 2016 Hack

    A California federal jury on Wednesday convicted Uber's former security chief Joseph Sullivan of criminal obstruction and concealment of a felony for hiding a massive 2016 data breach from authorities, crimes that could put the former federal prosecutor and cybersecurity expert behind bars for years.

  • October 05, 2022

    Ex-Blue Bell CEO Gets 2023 Retrial Date In Listeria Case

    Prosecutors could have another chance in 2023 at a conviction for Blue Bell Creameries Inc.'s former CEO after his first trial in August ended with a jury unable to decide whether he fraudulently hid positive listeria tests in some of the company's products.

  • October 05, 2022

    Calif. Man Gets 10 Years For Pro Athlete Tax Fraud, PPP Scam

    A California tax preparer was sentenced to 10 years in prison on Wednesday for his role in a scheme to obtain inflated returns on behalf of professional athlete clients and another plot to defraud the Paycheck Protection Program.

  • October 05, 2022

    Trustee Asks 2nd. Circ. To Toss Kossoff's 'Mystifying' Appeal

    The bankruptcy trustee for defunct real estate law firm Kossoff PLLC slammed sole member Mitchell Kossoff's "mystifying" attempts to upend a contempt order mandating that he turn over firm records, arguing his incarceration on criminal charges moots his self-incrimination fears.

  • October 05, 2022

    11th Circ. Fast-Tracks DOJ's Appeal Of Trump Special Master

    The Eleventh Circuit agreed Wednesday to expedite the government's appeal of a Florida federal judge's decision to appoint a special master to screen documents seized at former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate.

  • October 05, 2022

    MVP: Dechert's Andrew J. Levander

    Andrew J. Levander, chair of Dechert LLP, represented a billionaire antiquities collector during an intense investigation that concluded with no criminal charges and negotiated a $200 million settlement between JPMorgan and federal regulators over the bank's failure to track employees' electronic communications, earning him a spot as one of Law360's 2022 White Collar MVPs.

  • October 05, 2022

    Jones Day Adds Ex-SDNY Money Laundering Chief In NY

    Jones Day announced Tuesday that it has added a former New York federal prosecutor to its investigations and white collar defense practice.

  • October 05, 2022

    Ex-Amazon Coder Avoids Prison For Capital One Data Breach

    A former Amazon.com coder who was convicted of compromising 100 million people's personal data in the 2019 Capital One breach received a sentence of five years probation and three years of house arrest Tuesday.

  • October 04, 2022

    Inside A Boutique's $900M FCA Deal, Its Latest Milestone Case

    A $900 million settlement of doctor-bribing allegations against Biogen shattered False Claims Act records and gave a boutique Boston firm its second history-making lawsuit under the FCA. The lead counsel for whistleblowers in each case spoke with Law360 about how the resolution could change the pharmaceutical industry's kickback culture, how his earlier suit improved drugmaker conduct, and how he built two of the FCA's seminal cases.

  • October 04, 2022

    Ex-Trump Ally Implies UAE Ties Were Routine Business

    An attorney for Thomas Barrack on Tuesday sought to show jurors during the illicit lobbying trial of the Colony Capital Inc. founder that his close relationship with United Arab Emirates officials was just a normal part of doing business for the globe-trotting former adviser to former President Donald Trump, pointing to the executive's numerous contacts with other world leaders. 

  • October 04, 2022

    Fla. Doctor Pleads Guilty To Charge In $681M Fraud Scheme

    A Palm Beach County, Florida, doctor pled guilty Tuesday to operating a $681 million scheme to bill for fraudulent tests and treatments for vulnerable patients seeking treatment for drug and alcohol addiction.

  • October 04, 2022

    Michigan Officials Dodge Felonies Over Flint Conduct

    A Michigan state judge on Tuesday tossed charges against seven current and former state and local officials who were accused of criminal misconduct through their roles in the Flint lead-tainted drinking water crisis.

  • October 04, 2022

    The CFTC Commish Who Wants Wrongdoers To Fess Up

    U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission member Christy Goldsmith Romero has become the lone voice calling for changes to the way the agency pursues settlements with alleged wrongdoers, but she told Law360 that she's determined to bring her fellow commissioners on board with her proposal to require more defendants to face the music and admit they broke the rules. 

  • October 04, 2022

    9th Circ. Won't Undo SEC's Win Against Settlement Holdouts

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission will keep its win against three defendants who, unlike their 15 co-defendants, refused to settle over allegations they posed as retail investors to buy and "flip" municipal bonds, the Ninth Circuit ruled Tuesday, saying they behaved as brokers despite not being registered.

  • October 04, 2022

    As Celebs Shill Crypto, SEC Aims To Be Ultimate Influencer

    Kim Kardashian's $1.26 million run-in with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for touting the "crypto security" EthereumMax on Instagram without disclosing that she was a paid promoter sends a blaring warning to influencers that crypto promotion on social media is not immune from securities laws.

  • October 04, 2022

    Doc Says SDNY Judge Showed Bias In $30M Injury Scam Case

    A New York doctor charged with conducting unnecessary surgeries in a $30 million trip-and-fall fraud scheme asked a Manhattan federal judge to remove himself from the case Tuesday, saying the judge's string of scathing comments shows he has "prejudged" the outcome.

  • October 04, 2022

    Trump Asks High Court To Intervene In Mar-A-Lago Docs Case

    Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to step in and reverse an Eleventh Circuit order that allowed the U.S. Department of Justice to review classified documents seized from his Florida resort and residence, arguing that the appellate court lacks jurisdiction.

  • October 04, 2022

    Girardi Victims Hit NY Law Firm With $6.3M Conversion Suit

    Girardi Keese founder Tom Girardi illegally gave $6.3 million from a burn victim's settlement to a New York lawyer who founded a litigation lending company, the victim's family says in a new lawsuit filed in Los Angeles.

  • October 04, 2022

    Northeastern University Manager Staged Explosion, Feds Say

    A manager at Northeastern University who claimed that he was injured by an explosion at the school actually staged the incident, Boston federal prosecutors said Tuesday as they announced charges against him. 

  • October 04, 2022

    Ex-Calif. Atty Gets 3 Years For Forging Court Docs

    A disbarred California lawyer was sentenced to 37 months in prison Monday on charges that he lied to clients and forged court documents to get paid for cases he had never filed.

  • October 04, 2022

    Cooperator In Failed $500M Fraud Case Asks For No Prison

    A defendant who cooperated with the government during the failed fraud prosecution of his family's real estate business is asking a New York federal court to receive no jail time, probation or restitution because of the lenient sentences given to his co-defendants and his assistance in the investigation.

  • October 04, 2022

    Cayuga Nation Invokes Tribal Immunity In Pot Sales Fight

    The Cayuga Nation is asking a New York federal court to throw out counterclaims lobbed against it in a suit seeking to bar a group of people and their businesses from selling cannabis illegally on its land, saying as a sovereign nation, it has immunity from those claims.

Expert Analysis

  • Limiting The Scope Of Representation Is Critical For Lawyers

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    A Mississippi federal court's recent decision in Kee v. Howard L. Nations PC highlights the importance of well-written engagement letters, and specifically why it is vital for attorneys to specify exactly which services they intend to supply, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Whistleblowers Will Be Key To Curbing Cannabis Fraud In NY

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    As New York begins accepting license applications for its legal marijuana market, qui tam suits brought by whistleblowers under the New York False Claims Act will be a valuable tool for safeguarding the integrity of the developing industry, especially with regard to combating tax fraud, say Max Rodriguez and Sidney Cobb at Pollock Cohen.

  • Fine Over Bank Texts Signals Books, Records Crackdown

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    Federal securities regulators' recent $1.8 billion settlement with 15 broker-dealers and an investment adviser for failing to preserve employees' communications on unauthorized messaging apps demonstrates heightened regulatory focus on books and records requirements, and highlights compliance considerations for financial institutions, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • No-Poach Plea Hiccups Point To DOJ's Unsound Theory

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    After a series of setbacks, the U.S. Department of Justice could soon obtain its first no-poach conviction, but complications in a recent change-of-plea hearing demonstrate that the government’s problems may continue as long as it incorrectly insists that labor cases are the same as any other antitrust conspiracy, say Mark Butscha and Matthew Ridings at Thompson Hine.

  • Attys Shouldn't Assume Judicial Critique Is Protected Speech

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    As it becomes more commonplace to see criticism of the judiciary in the media, licensed attorneys are well advised to remember that they may have less freedom than nonlawyers to make protected speech critical of the judiciary, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • 2nd Circ. Trump Ruling Is A Tale Of 2 Statutory Interpretations

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    In Carroll v. Trump, a split Second Circuit used tried-and-true methods of statutory interpretation to rule the 45th president was a U.S. employee, showing that reasonable minds can reach opposite conclusions concerning the meaning of a statute, say David McTaggart and Kevin Savarese at Duane Morris.

  • DOJ Corporate Enforcement Shift May Chill Self-Disclosures

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    Recent changes to the U.S. Department of Justice’s corporate criminal enforcement policy promise more sticks than carrots, which could make companies less likely to self-disclose misconduct and cooperate with the government, leading to fewer criminal cases against entities and individuals, say attorneys at V&E.

  • Implications Of SEC's Latest Insider Trading Charges

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recently settled insider trading charges against officers of a mobile internet company highlights the danger of setting up Rule 10b5-1 plans while even arguably in possession of material nonpublic information, and provides some clues about proposed changes to the rules governing such plans, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • 13 Cognitive Distortions That Plague Defense Witnesses

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    In civil litigation, witnesses exhibiting negative thought patterns can spell trouble — so defense counsel should familiarize themselves with the most common cognitive distortions that can cripple their witnesses' testimony, and try to intervene to help reframe their perceptions, say Bill Kanasky Jr. and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • COVID Relief Borrowers, Lenders May See Increased Scrutiny

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    Armed with a recently extended statute of limitations, federal prosecutors are building increasingly complex fraud cases focused on misuse of COVID-19 relief loans, involving larger dollar amounts and more defendants, and necessitating vigilance from lenders, say attorneys at Polsinelli.

  • Series

    Keys To A 9-0 High Court Win: Practicality Over Perfection

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    When I argued for the petitioner in Wooden v. U.S. last year, I discovered that preparation is key, but so is the right kind of preparation — in giving decisive answers to the U.S. Supreme Court justices' hypothetical questions I was not aiming for perfection, just the best response available, says Allon Kedem at Arnold & Porter.

  • What New Bar Exam Means For Law Students And Schools

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    Stephanie Acosta at UWorld discusses how law students and law schools can start preparing now for the new bar exam launching in 2026, which is expected to emphasize real-world lawyering skills-based tasks over rote memorization.

  • Uncertainty Lingers Around DOJ's Antitrust Leniency Shift

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    As evidenced by discussions at the International Cartel Workshop, the debate continues over the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent decision to tighten the criteria to qualify for leniency in antitrust investigations, raising questions about whether the amendments did more harm than good to future enforcement, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Apple's New Messaging Features Will Complicate E-Discovery

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    Apple's newest mobile operating system allows users to edit and recall messages and recover deleted messages, which could significantly increase the time, burden and expense of processing and analyzing cellphones if messages or their associated metadata become an area of scrutiny in a case, says Jarrett Coco at Nelson Mullins.

  • Making The Argument For A Meaningful Sentence Reduction

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    As a recent case in Florida federal court shows, when a criminal defendant accepts responsibility but still faces a sentencing guideline that exceeds a statutory cap, counsel should rely on Eleventh Circuit precedent to argue in favor of a meaningful reduction of prison time, say Joseph DeMaria and Marissa Kingman at Fox Rothschild.

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