Transportation

  • September 30, 2022

    Ex-Uber Exec Put Reputation Over Law, Jury Told In Closing

    Former Uber security chief Joseph Sullivan put his reputation and the company's "over his obligations," a federal prosecutor told jurors Friday at the close of Sullivan's criminal obstruction trial on charges he concealed a massive security breach from authorities investigating a similar incident from two years prior.

  • September 30, 2022

    The 5 Biggest Cases This Supreme Court Term

    The reversal of constitutional abortion protections last term has court watchers wondering: Is affirmative action next? But the lawsuits against Harvard University and the University of North Carolina are far from the only blockbusters on the docket in what is likely to be another landslide term for conservatives. Here, Law360 breaks down five cases to watch. 

  • September 30, 2022

    Judge Guts Navajo Nation's Suit Against Relocation Office

    An Arizona federal judge has rejected the Navajo Nation's bid for him to oversee the office tasked with relocating Navajo citizens from Hopi Tribe land in northern Arizona, calling it the kind of "broad programmatic attack" against a federal agency that can't be brought in the courts.

  • September 30, 2022

    Importer Seeks Re-Export Guarantee After Forced Labor Flop

    The company behind the first administrative law challenge to an import block tied to forced labor has asked the U.S. Court of International Trade to guarantee its right to re-export its palm oil after failing to clear its provenance.

  • September 30, 2022

    CBD Cos. Urge 2nd Circ. To Toss Racketeering Claim

    Three CBD companies have urged the Second Circuit to uphold a lower court's ruling that tossed RICO claims brought by a former trucker who allegedly lost his job after consuming a product containing detectable amounts of THC, saying the law clearly does not cover damages for personal injury.

  • September 30, 2022

    Law360's The Term: A New Normal For The Supreme Court?

    As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares for the 2022-2023 term with a slate of new blockbuster cases, the fallout from last term's Dobbs decision and its leaked draft is still reverberating. And while pandemic-era restrictions at the court are loosening, the hosts discuss with veteran court reporter Amy Howe what kind of "new normal" to expect at the high court.

  • September 30, 2022

    Boeing Wants Air Force One False Claims Act Suit Tossed

    Boeing has urged a Washington federal court to dismiss a False Claims Act suit alleging it used an unqualified subcontractor on a $3.9 billion contract to build Air Force One aircraft, saying the relator hadn't alleged any specific false claims.

  • September 30, 2022

    SPAC Cancels Merger Plans With Chinese Automaker Chijet

    A special purpose acquisition company that was set to acquire and take public Chinese automaker Chijet Motor Co. at a valuation of $2.55 billion has terminated merger plans, according to a securities filing Friday.

  • September 30, 2022

    Insurers, Construction Co. Settle Suit Over Sunken Barge

    An Alaskan construction company seeking coverage from several insurers for costs stemming from the sinking of a barge notified a federal court that the parties have reached a settlement agreement.

  • September 30, 2022

    No Signs Of Supreme Court's Conservatives Slowing Down

    The U.S. Supreme Court's last term was considered by many to be the most consequential in a generation as the court's conservative justices delivered key victories on abortion and guns. But one quick glance at the new term's docket suggests this new supermajority has only just begun shifting the law to the right.

  • September 30, 2022

    Clark Partington Facing DQ Bid In Fla. Whistleblower Case

    A former client of Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse PA has asked a federal judge to disqualify the firm from representing a commercial pilot in a whistleblower case against him over his alleged illegal monopoly control of a northwest Florida airport.

  • September 30, 2022

    How Well Do You Know Supreme Court History?

    As the U.S. Supreme Court kicks off its October 2022 term, it's the perfect time to dive into the court's history. Law360 will try to stump you with this 10-question quiz about the court. 

  • September 30, 2022

    Mass. Law Doesn't Spare Drivers From Arbitrating OT Fight

    Two drivers must arbitrate their claims that a last-mile delivery company misclassified them as independent contractors and dodged providing them overtime pay, a Virginia federal judge ruled, saying that Massachusetts law can't apply.

  • September 30, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen German software company Topalsson face a breach of contract claim from law firm CMS, Pfizer and BioNTech look for the cure to their patent woes in a claim against Moderna, and Alaska Airlines ready for departure in a commercial contracts claim against Virgin Aviation. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • September 30, 2022

    Ex-Bankruptcy Judge Sontchi To Referee Twitter Trial Prep

    Delaware's chancellor appointed retired U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Christopher S. Sontchi on Friday to serve as a special master for remaining discovery disputes between Elon Musk and Twitter Inc. in Twitter's suit to force the Tesla Inc. CEO to close on a $44 billion offer for the social media giant.

  • September 30, 2022

    American Airlines Accused Of Ridiculing Passenger's Weight

    A passenger has accused American Airlines of humiliating her on a flight from North Carolina last year after a flight attendant requested over the loudspeaker that she change seats for "weight and balance" reasons.

  • September 30, 2022

    3 Things To Watch At High Court Wetlands Oral Arguments

    The federal government's ability to regulate and require permits under the Clean Water Act will hang in the balance Monday as the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments from landowners and business groups pushing for a narrow statutory interpretation and the government and environmentalists seeking more expansive authority.

  • September 30, 2022

    Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson Takes Bench, Makes History

    Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson received her official commission Friday in a ceremony attended by President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, becoming the first Black female justice to take the nation's top bench in its 230-year history.

  • September 30, 2022

    Chinese Carmaker Geely Buys 8% Stake In Aston Martin

    Chinese automotive manufacturer Geely said Friday that it has taken an almost 8% stake in British luxury carmaker Aston Martin, as part of a £654 million ($726 million) capital raise.

  • September 29, 2022

    NY Follows Calif. With Regs To End Gas Car Sales By 2035

    New York will require all vehicles sold in the state to produce zero emissions starting in 2035, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced Thursday, following the lead of California, which finalized a similar plan earlier this year.

  • September 29, 2022

    Md. Climate Change Suits Can Stay In State Court

    A Maryland federal judge on Thursday sided with two local governments that said their lawsuits claiming that fossil fuel giants concealed the climate change effects of their products belong in state court.

  • September 29, 2022

    IP Forecast: Philip Morris Looks To Snuff Out ITC Ban

    Two of the largest tobacco companies in the world head to the Federal Circuit to fight over a ban R.J. Reynolds won at the U.S. International Trade Commission that blocked Philip Morris from importing IQOS-branded heated tobacco products into the U.S. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • September 29, 2022

    Uber Threw Ex-Security Chief Under Bus, Ex-PR Exec Testifies

    The criminal defense for a former Uber security chief accused of concealing a massive 2016 data breach from authorities concluded Thursday with testimony from an ex-communications executive for the ride-hailing giant, who said Uber wrongly portrayed Joseph Sullivan as a "bad apple" to distance itself from the hacking.

  • September 29, 2022

    Georgia Developer Sues County For Nixing I-20 Travel Plaza

    An Atlanta-area county's rule barring new truck stops unlawfully thwarted plans for a QuikTrip-branded travel plaza near Interstate 20, a Georgia real estate company said, alleging violations of a federal statute and the Constitution in federal court.

  • September 29, 2022

    Shipping Group Calls Puerto Rico Jones Act Waiver Unlawful

    A coalition representing U.S. vessel owners, operators, mariners, shipyards and other domestic stakeholders said Thursday the U.S. Department of Homeland Security skirted federal law by giving a pass to a foreign-flagged ship to engage in "disaster arbitrage" in ferrying fuel to hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Keys To A 9-0 High Court Win: Practicality Over Perfection

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    When I argued for the petitioner in Wooden v. U.S. last year, I discovered that preparation is key, but so is the right kind of preparation — in giving decisive answers to the U.S. Supreme Court justices' hypothetical questions I was not aiming for perfection, just the best response available, says Allon Kedem at Arnold & Porter.

  • 5 Considerations When Seeking Federal EV Funding

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    A recent White House fact sheet shows how federal efforts to support the full scope of the electric vehicle industry have moved the needle, but some details about how to use those funds are still being ironed out, and there are a few issues to watch, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • What New Bar Exam Means For Law Students And Schools

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    Stephanie Acosta at UWorld discusses how law students and law schools can start preparing now for the new bar exam launching in 2026, which is expected to emphasize real-world lawyering skills-based tasks over rote memorization.

  • State COVID Insurance Rulings Highlight Errors In Dismissals

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    Recent California and Vermont decisions in favor of policyholders, along with a $48 million jury verdict in Texas, underscore the error that courts are making by dismissing COVID-19 business interruption lawsuits at the pleading stage without consideration of the facts and evidence in each case, say Joseph Niczky and Michael Levine at Hunton.

  • Apple's New Messaging Features Will Complicate E-Discovery

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    Apple's newest mobile operating system allows users to edit and recall messages and recover deleted messages, which could significantly increase the time, burden and expense of processing and analyzing cellphones if messages or their associated metadata become an area of scrutiny in a case, says Jarrett Coco at Nelson Mullins.

  • Law Firm Inclusion Efforts Often Overlook Business Staff

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    Law firms committed to a culture of universal inclusion can take steps to foster a sense of belonging in their business services teams, says Jennifer Johnson at Calibrate Consulting.

  • EPA Guidance Signals Greater Enviro Justice Focus In Permits

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    A list of frequently asked questions recently released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emphasizes environmental justice and civil rights considerations in permitting for a wide range of commercial activities across many industries, and is likely to reverberate loudly in environmental permitting for years to come, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • An Associate's Guide To Rebounding After A Layoff

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    Law firm associates laid off due to economic conditions can recuperate and move forward by practicing self-care, identifying key skills to leverage during the job search, engaging in self-reflection and more, say Kate Sheikh at Major Lindsey and wellness consultant Jarrett Green.

  • AML Regulation Of Lawyers Is Imminent And Controversial

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    The U.S. House of Representatives' recently passed National Defense Authorization Act subjects lawyers engaged in certain financial-related activities to anti-money laundering regulation under the Bank Secrecy Act, which could pit lawyers against clients in ways harmful to the rule of law and administration of justice, says Jeremy Glicksman at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office in New York.

  • Opinion

    FERC Proposal Conflicts With 'Major Questions' Doctrine

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    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chairman Richard Glick's recent claim that FERC retains the right to evaluate the greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas projects flies in the face of the so-called major questions doctrine laid out by the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this year, says attorney Terry Campo.

  • Key Adaptations For Law Firms Amid Quiet Quitting Movement

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    While quiet quitting may not be sustainable at law firms with billable hour requirements, there are specific steps law firms should take to maintain engagement and otherwise respond to the trend's underlying message that associates won't spend all their waking hours at work if they don't feel it's worthwhile, says Meredith Kahan at Whiteford Taylor.

  • How EU Plan Would Cut Red Tape To Boost Green Hydrogen

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    A recent proposal from the European Parliament would greatly simplify the requirements for production of renewable fuels including green hydrogen and green ammonia — indicating that Europe is moving toward a more flexible and business-friendly regulatory environment for the green hydrogen sector, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • Creating A Hybrid Work Policy? Be Intentional And Inclusive

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    The pandemic has changed expectations for the future of work forever, and as more employees demand hybrid working options, law firms must develop policies and models that are intentional, inclusive and iterative to lead the industry into the future, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • No Inflation Act Boost For EPA Power Over Greenhouse Gases

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    An analysis of the recently passed Inflation Reduction Act indicates that, despite claims to the contrary, it does not grant the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency the authority to broadly regulate greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector, say attorneys at Saul Ewing.

  • 7th Circ. 401(k) Ruling Supports Early ERISA Claim Dismissal

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    The Seventh Circuit’s recent dismissal of 401(k) mismanagement and excessive fee claims in Albert v. Oshkosh may allay concerns that the U.S. Supreme Court's opinion in Hughes v. Northwestern University would influence courts to deny dismissal motions in similar Employee Retirement Income Security Act cases, say attorneys at Proskauer.

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