More Employment Coverage

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Clears Fujian Jinhua On Feds' Trade Secrets Claims

    A California federal judge has found that the federal government failed to show semiconductor-maker Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Co. Ltd. is guilty of various claims in a suit accusing it of economic espionage in a trade secrets case.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Says Ermi Counterclaims In Qui Tam Case Can Stand

    A Georgia federal judge has refused to free Ermi LLC's former chief compliance officer from counterclaims the company lodged in response to her whistleblower suit accusing the company of fraud and retaliation, with the judge saying the company has adequately alleged breaches of fiduciary duty and contract claims.

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Restaurant Rejects Revamped Wine-Tasting Death Suit

    Citing the statute of limitations and an alleged failure to plead a valid case, a venerable New Haven restaurant has asked a Connecticut state judge to reject an amended lawsuit accusing it of recklessly overserving alcohol at a "mandatory" employee wine tasting event and allegedly causing a worker's drunk driving death.

  • February 27, 2024

    Goldman's $4.6M Exec Compensation Deal OK'd By Chancery

    A Delaware Chancery Court judge on Tuesday approved a settlement deal in a derivative suit against Goldman Sachs Group alleging excessive compensation was paid to nonemployee directors, which includes an agreement by the company to change its compensation practices and reduce executives' pay by an estimated $4.6 million.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ex-NESN Exec Gets 3½ Years In Fraud Scheme

    A former executive at the Massachusetts cable network that broadcasts Red Sox and Bruins games was sentenced Tuesday to 3½ years in prison for embezzling nearly $600,000 from his employer through an elaborate invoicing scheme, crimes a judge called both "deliberate" and "insidious" and the government called "brazen."

  • February 27, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Revive Serbian IT Worker's Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday backed a manufacturing company's defeat of a former information technology employee's suit alleging he was fired because he's Serbian, finding he was let go for improperly accessing another worker's computer, not because of his nationality.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ga. ICE Facility Dismissed From Forced Labor Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Tuesday allowed an immigration detention facility to escape a proposed class action accusing it of forcing detainees to work for as little as $1 per day after it argued it couldn't be sued under Georgia law.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ascension Unit Will Pay $2.6M To End Time Clock BIPA Suit

    Presence Health Network in Illinois is set to pay $2.6 million to settle biometric privacy claims from a group of employees who claimed the health system violated their privacy rights by requiring them to scan their fingerprints for timekeeping without first obtaining consent, after a Chicago state judge signed off on the settlement.

  • February 26, 2024

    Sales Reps Score $1.6M In Fees After Beating RICO Case

    A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered a biotech startup to pay more than $1.6 million in legal fees to two former employees, after the company failed to convince a jury that the pair broke racketeering laws when they worked for a rival that stole proprietary information when setting up shop.

  • February 26, 2024

    FDIC Faces Staffing Crunch Amid Rising Turnover, IG Warns

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. is struggling to hire enough new employees to keep up with retirements and departures, especially in its examinations department, according to a report from the independent agency's inspector general.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ex-Bank CFO Cops To $700K Theft And Life Insurance Scam

    An ex-Eastern International Bank chief financial officer has pled guilty to defrauding the bank out of more than $700,000 to pay his personal expenses, and he admitted to opening life insurance policies in the names of bank employees to benefit his wife, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • February 26, 2024

    Real Estate Co. Resolves Employee, Tenant Data Breach Suit

    Property manager and redeveloper Centerspace LP has settled a putative class action accusing the company of violating state law by waiting nearly eight months to notify the more than 8,000 victims of a November 2021 data breach.

  • February 26, 2024

    Feds Say Fla. Atty Can't Undo COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A U.S. attorney's office has pushed back on a Florida lawyer's bid to vacate her conviction in Georgia federal court of conspiring to defraud a coronavirus pandemic relief program, saying the government doesn't have to prove she was "behind the keyboard" when the applications were submitted to be convicted of the charges.

  • February 26, 2024

    Voters Fight DeSantis' Bid To End Prosecutor Suspension Suit

    Two voters are urging a Florida federal judge not to throw out their suit challenging Gov. Ron DeSantis' suspension of elected prosecutor Monique Worrell, saying the case brings "plausible claims" of "egregious and norm-breaking constitutional violations" by the governor.

  • February 26, 2024

    'Blue Chips' Holds Up 30 Years Later Amid NCAA Rules Chaos

    Thirty years after the premiere of "Blue Chips," one of Hollywood's more memorable and star-studded treatments of corruption in college sports, the NCAA faces unprecedented challenges to long-standing definitions of what is and isn't legal for its athletes. Yet, a legal expert and the film's creators say, what Nick Nolte, Shaquille O'Neal and the rest of the cast depicted in the film has aged well.

  • February 23, 2024

    Top NC Labor Brass Face Retooled 'Incentive' Policy Suit

    A corrosion control company has retooled its claims that North Carolina labor officials incentivized inspectors to issue workplace safety citations, highlighting in a revised complaint the harm caused by the citations after its 2021 lawsuit was tossed last month for failing to make a stronger connection to its alleged injuries.

  • February 23, 2024

    The New BIPA? Attys Warn GIPA Is A 'Live Grenade'

    After notable appellate victories in biometric privacy cases, Illinois plaintiffs have seized upon a previously little-used law protecting workers' genetic privacy, leaving defense attorneys wondering if history will repeat itself and open companies to potentially explosive liability. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Nonprofit Fights To Keep Child Forced Labor Cocoa Suit Alive

    A nonprofit on Friday challenged U.S. Customs and Border Protection's bid to dismiss allegations the agency ignored a four-year petition to ban major chocolate companies from importing cocoa allegedly harvested by children, saying the delay harmed it by impairing its mission.

  • February 23, 2024

    Mich. Ex-Judge Disbarred For Sending Explicit Texts To Client

    A former Michigan state chief judge was disbarred after he sent sexually explicit text messages to a client, encouraged that client to drink while they were on probation, and practiced while his license was suspended following a drunk driving plea.

  • February 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs DOL's Black Lung Benefits Award For Miner

    The Sixth Circuit stood by an administrative law judge's ruling that a former coal miner is entitled to black lung benefits even if his long history of smoking might have also contributed to his pneumoconiosis, denying a petition for review from the man's former employer.

  • February 22, 2024

    Athletes' NCAA Suit Will Wait For JPML

    College athletes fighting for a slice of the broadcasting profits their games earn will have to wait until the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation decides whether to consolidate their case with another similar suit before they continue briefing, a Colorado federal judge has ruled.

  • February 22, 2024

    Coldwell Banker Wins Trade Secrets Fight On Directed Verdict

    A California state judge issued a directed verdict for Coldwell Banker's Orange County division in a case where a rival real estate company accused it of poaching employees and stealing trade secrets.

  • February 22, 2024

    DraftKings Says Ex-Exec's $310K Attys Fees Bid Is Excessive

    DraftKings has told a California federal court that the "whopping" $310,000 in attorney fees requested by a former executive after the company shuffled the case back and forth between state and federal court is an unreasonable fee no "reasonable client" would pay.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fla. Whistleblower Suit Deal Averts Littler's Disqualification

    Littler Mendelson PC won't have to face a disqualification bid in Florida federal court over a firm attorney's purported use of a mistakenly produced, privileged document at a deposition after its client reached a settlement in a whistleblower retaliation suit, court records show.

  • February 21, 2024

    ByteDance Can't Yet Arbitrate Ex-Coder's Wrongful Firing Suit

    A California federal judge declined to send a former ByteDance Inc. engineer's wrongful termination suit to arbitration, writing in a ruling made public Tuesday that there are factual disputes over whether he signed employment agreements containing arbitration clauses, saying the matter should be resolved via a jury trial.

Expert Analysis

  • Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Future Not Looking Bright For Calif. Employee Nonsolicits

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    California's new legislation imposing potentially harsh consequences on employers for attempting to enforce noncompetes raises questions about the fate of employee nonsolicitation agreements — and both federal and state court decisions suggest the days of the latter may be numbered, say Anthony Oncidi and Philippe Lebel at Proskauer.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.