More Employment Coverage

  • April 26, 2021

    Photog Says NY Post Fired Him Over Virus PPE Complaint

    A former New York Post photographer claims the tabloid newspaper illegally fired him after he complained about its refusal to provide staff photographers and reporters with protective gear amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Manhattan.

  • April 26, 2021

    SandRidge Asks Texas Justices To Toss Electric Shock Suit

    SandRidge Energy Inc. has asked the Texas Supreme Court to overturn a lower court's decision allowing a contractor who was shocked while working near a live wire to proceed with his suit against the company, arguing it wasn't required to warn the contractor about the live wire.

  • April 26, 2021

    Insurance Exec Barred From Competing With Old Firm

    A former executive for an insurance underwriting firm has been temporarily barred from competing with the company or using any of its information under a Georgia federal court ruling.

  • April 26, 2021

    Ga. Gov. Weighing Candidates For New State Court Judgeship

    Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp is set to select one of three candidates for a newly created Superior Court judge position after a new law added an 11th judge to the Cobb Judicial Circuit. Here, Law360 looks at the Cobb vacancy and the candidates hoping to fill it.

  • April 26, 2021

    High Court Won't Hear DOD Reviewability Doctrine Challenge

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case brought by a class of noncitizen military enlistees Monday, ending their challenge to a now-defunct background check policy as well as arguments around when courts may review U.S. Department of Defense policy.

  • April 26, 2021

    Justices Won't Let Texas Sue Calif. In Religious Liberty Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected Texas' bid to file a suit challenging California's policy blocking state employees from traveling on taxpayers' dime to states with laws deemed to be anti-LGBTQ, despite Texas' claim that its ability to protect its citizens' religious liberty was being trampled.

  • April 26, 2021

    High Court Won't Take Up WWE Concussion Case

    The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal looking to revive claims alleging that World Wrestling Entertainment hid the risk of repeated head injuries from wrestlers, leaving in place a Second Circuit decision finding the appeals untimely.

  • April 23, 2021

    8th Circ. Tyson Case Could Streamline COVID-19 Suits

    A jurisdictional issue to be decided by the Eighth Circuit in a suit alleging Tyson Foods Inc. mishandled a COVID-19 outbreak at an Iowa plant could set a legal precedent that would streamline injury litigation over coronavirus exposures and deaths, attorneys say.

  • April 23, 2021

    Covidien Urges 1st Circ. To Reconsider Ex-Exec's Patent Win

    Covidien LP has asked the full First Circuit to rehear a case that affirmed Covidien had no rights to three varicose vein treatment patents filed by a former top executive, arguing that the panel relied on an incorrect interpretation of the jury verdict.

  • April 23, 2021

    Pizza Chain Owner Says Biometric Privacy Suit Was A Misfire

    Rave Restaurant Group Inc. has urged an Illinois state court to dismiss a proposed class action accusing the company of illegally collecting and using employees' fingerprints, arguing the worker who sued has never worked for the company.

  • April 23, 2021

    Ind. Sets Payroll Provider Registration, Withholding Rules

    Indiana will require payroll service providers to register annually with the state Department of Revenue and order that state employers be notified of late withholding reports or tax remittances, under legislation adopted into state law.

  • April 23, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Citadel Securities sue a former trader, a shipping company appeal findings involving a jailed tycoon, and the U.K. arm of Tata Steel file suit against companies owned by Indian tycoon Sanjeev Gupta. Here, Law360 looks at those and other cases. 

  • April 22, 2021

    5th Circ. Affirms Off-Duty Deputy's Deadly Force Immunity

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday affirmed qualified immunity granted to an off-duty Texas sheriff's deputy whom a motorist accused of using deadly force, finding that the off-duty deputy believed the motorist was reaching into her waistband for a weapon and that his reaction — shooting her multiple times — was reasonable, and therefore protected.

  • April 22, 2021

    Outgoing Ga. Appeals Court Chief Is Eager For Presiding Role

    The Georgia Court of Appeals will get a new chief on July 1, when Chief Judge Christopher J. McFadden steps down at the end of a two-year term while hoping to keep a leadership role on the court. 

  • April 22, 2021

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania are the latest colleges to escape students' claims over coronavirus-related campus closures, Cigna wants out of a $9.3 million suit claiming it won't pay for policyholders' COVID-19 testing, and the U.S. provider of tickets to the 2021 Olympics has been sued for allegedly refusing to issue full refunds.

  • April 22, 2021

    Pilgrim's Pride Sued Over COVID-19 Spouse Deaths

    A Pilgrim's Pride employee hit the meatpacker with a wrongful death suit Wednesday in Texas federal court, accusing the company of placing profits over safety after she contracted COVID-19 on the job and purportedly transmitted the infection to her now-deceased husband.

  • April 22, 2021

    Gilead Whistleblower Dinged For Lost Texts In Kickbacks Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge agreed on Thursday to sanction a former Gilead Sciences Inc. employee and his lawyers for failing to take proper steps to preserve text messages at issue in a whistleblower case they're pursuing against the company over alleged kickbacks paid to doctors.

  • April 22, 2021

    Judge Nixes Emory Bid To End Blinded Woman's Med Mal Suit

    A Georgia state judge rejected a bid by a metropolitan Atlanta hospital to end a malpractice suit brought by a woman who alleges that she was blinded by a surgeon's reckless decision, saying there were still factual questions to resolve in the dispute.

  • April 21, 2021

    Ill. Judge Blasts Attys While Tossing Biometric Privacy Suit

    An Illinois federal judge criticized Stephan Zouras LLP's investigation and handling of a client's biometric privacy suit as he dismissed the case, saying the attorneys "skirted the line" of sanctionable conduct and "should have pulled back" once significant issues arose. 

  • April 21, 2021

    Texas Oil & Gas Services Biz Dispute Ends In $31M Verdict

    A Texas state jury found that an oil and gas electrical equipment company's majority owner failed to act in the company's best interest, and awarded about $31 million to a partial owner of the company and to the company itself.

  • April 21, 2021

    Construction Co. Sues Ex-Director For 'Raiding' Staff, Data

    A Houston-headquartered construction company hit a former employee with a breach of contract suit in Texas federal court Tuesday for allegedly poaching some of the business's top staff and misusing company secrets after he formed a rival firm.

  • April 21, 2021

    MetLife, AIG Sued Over Afghanistan Police Trainer's Death

    The widow of an Illinois civilian contractor who died while training police in Afghanistan sued MetLife and AIG on Wednesday, alleging that the carriers wrongfully rejected her claims under life and accidental death policies worth more than $1 million.

  • April 21, 2021

    Insurer Wins Suit Against Atty Who Took Data To Next Job

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday gave Berkley Insurance Co. a permanent injunction in a suit accusing a Brooklyn lawyer of stealing "massive amounts" of secret data from his job with the insurer before moving to a competitor and subsequently getting fired.

  • April 21, 2021

    Munck Wilson Adds Former Jones Day Atty To LA Office

    Texas-based Munck Wilson Mandala LLP announced Tuesday that it has added an experienced litigation partner to the firm's growing Los Angeles office.

  • April 21, 2021

    Senate Confirms Vanita Gupta As Associate AG

    The U.S. Senate confirmed Vanita Gupta as associate attorney general on a nearly party-line vote Wednesday, capping off a contentious fight that saw Republicans blast the civil rights attorney for her past support for decriminalizing drugs and shrinking police forces.

Expert Analysis

  • Mitigating Risk Amid Layoff-Driven Confidential Witness Boom

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    Corporate counsel should proactively allay risk stemming from securities fraud plaintiffs' use of confidential witnesses, which could become more common against the backdrop of pandemic-induced layoffs, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Pleading Tortious Interference Claims In Calif. After Ixchel

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    Last August, the California Supreme Court ruled in Ixchel v. Biogen that claims for tortious interference with at-will agreements require evidence of independent wrongful acts, and in the decision's wake we are already seeing indications that motions to dismiss such claims may become more successful, say Amanda Main and Tijana Brien at Cooley.

  • The Case For Diversity In Internal Investigation Teams

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    Teams that represent differing backgrounds can uniquely strengthen internal investigation processes with more thorough deliberation, better interviewee trust-building and more effective problem-solving, so law firms and clients alike must avoid the natural impulse to select homogenous groups, say Karin Portlock and Jabari Julien at Gibson Dunn.

  • Ariz. Workers' Comp Opinion May Apply To COVID-19 Stress

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    The Arizona Supreme Court's recent decision about post-traumatic stress disorder in France v. Industrial Commission of Arizona may open the door for employees in the state to receive workers' compensation benefits for mental injuries caused by the stresses associated with forced telework amid COVID-19, says Ryan Heath at Gilson Daub.

  • 5 Ways Outside Counsel Can Impress Their Clients

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    Attorneys can build lasting relationships with corporate clients by thinking of in-house counsel as project partners, adhering to a few basic communication principles and thinking beyond legal advice, says Gerry Caron, chief counsel for safety, health and environment at Cabot.

  • Pa. Tax Talk: Who Can Get A Philadelphia Wage Tax Refund

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    The specifics of Philadelphia-based employers' remote work policies during the pandemic will have a significant effect on employees' abilities to collect city wage tax refunds and on the future of the wage tax itself, says Jennifer Karpchuk at Chamberlain Hrdlicka.

  • IRS Should Level The Field For R&D Tax Credits

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    A recent increase in denials of research and development tax credits to small businesses in the architectural, engineering and construction community shows the Internal Revenue Service should issue new guidance to ensure a fair playing field and an opportunity to continue innovating in the U.S., says Julio Gonzalez at Engineered Tax Services.

  • Ethics Tips For Attorneys Telecommuting Across State Lines

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    Attorneys working remotely from jurisdictions in which they are not admitted should take precautionary steps to avoid engaging in unauthorized practice of law, say John Schmidt and Michael Seaman at Phillips Lytle.

  • For Trucking Accident Plaintiffs, Access To Evidence Is Key

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    The country is relying more than ever on the trucking industry during the COVID-19 pandemic, but when trucking companies fail to properly manage drivers, plaintiffs attorneys can use statutes that enforce access to evidence to obtain justice for accident victims, says Sam Coffey at Coffey Trial Law.

  • Inside DC Bar's New Guidance On Multiple Representation

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    The D.C. Bar recently cleared the way for lawyers to represent both a party and a witness in the same case in guidance that could prove influential as multiple representation in employment cases becomes increasingly common, says Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • 6 Ways Legal Employers Can Help Pandemic-Weary Parents

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    Parenting during the pandemic has introduced a series of competing personal and professional obligations for attorneys and professional staff, and even organizations that are supportive of their parent employees can take steps to do better, says Meredith Kahan at Saul Ewing.

  • How Cos. Can Weather Growing DOJ Labor Antitrust Scrutiny

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    In light of of the U.S. Department of Justice's increasing antitrust scrutiny of labor markets and President Joe Biden's vow to eliminate most noncompetes, companies should customize their compliance plans and review employee agreements to mitigate risk, say Eric Grannon and Adam Acosta at White & Case.

  • Pandemic Force Majeure Interpretations May Be Shifting

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    A New York federal court's ruling in JN Contemporary Art v. Phillips Auctioneers, deeming COVID-19 to be a natural disaster that triggers a force majeure clause, appears to loosen previously strict contours of contractual interpretation and could create a legal quandary for obligees, say Kimberly Daily and Matthew Rawlinson at Eversheds Sutherland.

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