More Employment Coverage

  • May 24, 2021

    Whistleblower Says Suit Over Firing Belongs In Calif.

    A former Western Digital executive has plenty of connections with the U.S. that give a California federal court jurisdiction over his lawsuit alleging the company fired him after he alerted authorities to possible tax fraud, he told the court.

  • May 24, 2021

    Ill. Justices Ring 'Alarm Bell' For Insurers On BIPA Coverage

    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling that a tanning salon's general liability insurer must defend it against a customer's Biometric Information Privacy Act lawsuit will embolden policyholders to seek coverage for BIPA claims, which could lead insurers to roll out higher premiums or more limitations on data privacy coverage.

  • May 24, 2021

    Pa. Panel Says Worker's Suicide Doesn't Bar Workers' Comp

    In a decision published Monday, a Pennsylvania appeals court rejected arguments that evidence of planning that went into a former transit worker's decision to commit suicide after suffering an on-the-job back injury meant that his family wasn't eligible to receive death benefits through the state's workers' compensation system.

  • May 21, 2021

    Clean Harbors, Aerotek Escape Worker's Severed-Thumb Suit

    A California magistrate judge on Friday threw out a suit by a temporary worker seeking damages for an accident in which his thumb was crushed and severed while he was working at a Shell Oil refinery, saying the state's Workers' Compensation Act covers any relief he can get from the injury.

  • May 21, 2021

    Cantey Hanger Brings Aboard 3 Litigation Attys

    Fort Worth-based Cantey Hanger LLP recently hired three attorneys who were formerly with small firm Vaughan & Ramsey.

  • May 20, 2021

    ​​​​​​​Feds Did 'About-Face' On Actual Costs, Sikorsky Tells Court

    Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. is asking a Wisconsin federal court to toss allegations that two Sikorsky units charged inflated costs through an illegal subcontracting arrangement, arguing that the government made an "about-face" to match its definition of actual costs to its allegations.

  • May 20, 2021

    NY Giants GC Threatened To 'Strangle' Employee, Suit Alleges

    The New York Giants were hit with a whistleblower lawsuit in New Jersey state court Thursday from a fired video director claiming the NFL team's general counsel threatened to "strangle" him if he spoke up about an alleged physical assault he witnessed at work.

  • May 20, 2021

    Texas Chemical Co. Says Ex-Staffer, Rival Stole Trade Secrets

    A chemical company says in Georgia state court one of its former sales leaders violated non-compete and confidentiality agreements by stealing information and bringing it to a rival company in a plot to keep an edge in the polymer market. 

  • May 20, 2021

    Elk Petroleum Ch. 11 Trustee Sues Execs For 'Gross' Failures

    A Chapter 11 litigation trustee for remnants of Elk Petroleum Inc. and its affiliates has sued four former top officers in Delaware's bankruptcy court on eight counts seeking damages ranging from $2.5 million to $32 million for financial "pilfering" and "gross" pre-bankruptcy governance failures.

  • May 20, 2021

    Staffing Biz Workrise Lands $300M Series E Financing

    Energy and infrastructure industry staffing business Workrise said Thursday it closed on a $300 million Series E funding round that included investors such as Baillie Gifford, Andreessen Horowitz and Franklin Templeton.

  • May 19, 2021

    Gov't Urges 9th Circ. To End Sex Assault Suit Against General

    The federal government urged the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to overturn a decision allowing a former Army colonel to pursue sexual assault claims against the Pentagon's second-highest-ranking officer, saying a bar on claims considered incident to military service should apply.

  • May 19, 2021

    Texas Gov.'s Mask Stance Won't Shift Employer Safety Plans

    Although the governor of Texas has issued a series of orders easing government-imposed COVID-19 restrictions, private employers are still likely to be cautious about worker safety, particularly in light of federal requirements to provide safe workplaces.

  • May 19, 2021

    Ill. Justices Skeptical Of Jury's $1M Negligent Training Award

    The Illinois Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed unsure whether it should restore a driver's $1 million injury award after a jury blamed a Chicago engineering company — but not its employee — for a highway crash involving an unstable Bobcat tractor.

  • May 19, 2021

    Workers Tell 2nd Circ. Judge Didn't Have To Punt On Amazon

    Federal judges should be willing and able to assess COVID-19 workplace safety, counsel for Amazon.com workers told the Second Circuit Wednesday, after an appellate judge sympathized with the jurist who kicked their case to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  • May 19, 2021

    Feds Say NCAA Coach's Whistleblower Threat Was Extortion

    A former assistant coach for the University of Louisville men's basketball team was charged with extortion Tuesday after he threatened to blow the whistle on alleged recruiting violations at the school.

  • May 18, 2021

    US Chamber Backs Walmart In 5th Circ. Opioid Challenge

    A slew of organizations, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Chain Drug Stores, have filed amicus briefs backing Walmart's bid to get the Fifth Circuit to revive a suit seeking clarification that the retail giant's current opioid prescription practices are lawful.

  • May 18, 2021

    Gilead Wants Harsher Sanctions For Kickbacks Whistleblower

    Gilead Sciences Inc. has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to rethink his decision that an ex-employee hadn't intentionally destroyed evidence when tens of thousands of text messages sought as part of a whistleblower case were lost on an old cellphone.

  • May 18, 2021

    Ohio Panel OKs Blocking Local Taxes On Teleworkers In 2021

    An Ohio tax-writing committee approved legislation Tuesday that would block cities from imposing their income taxes on remote workers for 2021 but wouldn't retroactively change a law that permitted cities to tax nonresidents during the coronavirus pandemic in 2020.

  • May 18, 2021

    Ill. High Court Mulls Arbitrator's Authority In University Firing

    The Illinois Educational Labor Relations Board and a union representing university professors told the state's top court Tuesday that an arbitrator didn't abuse his discretion when he found Western Illinois University failed to comply with an earlier award in a termination dispute.

  • May 18, 2021

    Uber Can't Force Arbitration In Ga. Suit Over Customer Murder

    The Georgia Court of Appeals has ruled that Uber can't force arbitration of a wrongful death case brought by the mother of an Uber Eats customer murdered by a delivery driver because it is unclear whether the company's terms and conditions were clearly visible on its smartphone application.

  • May 18, 2021

    Pioneer Tells Texas Justices Well Site Explosion Suit Is Settled

    Pioneer Natural Resources USA Inc. told the Texas Supreme Court it settled a dispute over a well site explosion that killed two men, so it no longer seeks to dodge a discovery order demanding its communications with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  • May 18, 2021

    Veteran Trial Lawyer Joins Dallas Trial Boutique 

    Trial boutique Lynn Pinker Hurst & Schwegmann LLP announced Tuesday it has hired a Holland & Knight LLP partner experienced in employment, intellectual property and complex business disputes in Dallas.

  • May 18, 2021

    Judge Fletcher Makes Way For 4th Biden Vacancy On 9th Circ.

    Ninth Circuit Judge William A. Fletcher is taking senior status, giving President Joe Biden a fourth chance to replace a Democratic appointee with a younger jurist on the historically liberal West Coast appeals court.

  • May 18, 2021

    'Angry Cheerleader' Case Could Chill NCAA Athletes' Protests

    A pending U.S. Supreme Court case over whether schools may discipline students for social media posts under the First Amendment may give public universities the ability to further restrict college athletes' online speech, including about social issues or to protest their treatment under NCAA rules, experts say.

  • May 18, 2021

    ComplianceHR CEO Rejoins Littler To Run Miami Office

    Management-side employment law firm Littler Mendelson PC on Monday announced the CEO of ComplianceHR, its joint venture with legal technology company Neota Logic, has returned to the law firm and that ComplianceHR's chief marketing officer has moved up to replace her.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • Expect Increasing Scrutiny Of Wage-Fixing, No-Poach Deals

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    Employers can expect more actions against wage-fixing or no-poach agreements as the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division cracks down on labor market collusion, so companies should consider tailoring these agreements on their scope, duration and definition of nonsolicitation, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Bio-Rad Ruling Highlights IP Assignment Clause Limits

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    The Federal Circuit's recent holding in Bio-Rad v. International Trade Commission, that an assignment clause wasn’t enough to claim patent ownership where the conception date followed former inventors’ employment, shows companies and workers the importance of specificity in drafting contractual limitations, say Bryan Vogel and Derrick Carman at Robins Kaplan.

  • Cannabis Legalization's Effects On Insurance Industry

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    Resolution of the legal uncertainty presented by the dueling federal and state approaches to cannabis will pave the way for legal cannabis businesses to access the insurance protections the industry needs for everything from workers' compensation to auto insurance to general liability, says Christy Thiems at the American Property Casualty Insurance Association.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • Justices Should Clarify Securities Fraud Loss Causation

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    At its May conference, the U.S. Supreme Court should agree to review BofI Securities Litigation, to clear up a circuit split on how to assess loss causation in securities fraud cases, as shareholder class actions increasingly focus on external events that led to a stock drop, says Lyle Roberts at Shearman & Sterling.

  • How Gov't FCPA Hiring Practices Theory May Pan Out In Court

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    In recent settlements with banks, U.S. authorities have taken the position that providing a job or even an unpaid internship to relatives or friends of foreign officials is a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, but it is worth assessing how this theory would fare in individual prosecutions, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • Leverage The National Interest Waiver To Help US Economy

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    Understanding the intricacies and complexities of the national interest waiver, and positioning this immigration benefit to foreign nationals who are likely to create jobs for U.S. workers in health care, technology and other fields, are integral to post-pandemic economic recovery, says Miatrai Brown at Hayman Woodward.

  • Lessons From Key Expert Testimony In Chauvin Trial

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    During the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, pulmonologist Martin Tobin gave a gripping account of the cause of George Floyd’s death, engaging jurors in creative ways and bringing five important lessons for lawyers preparing expert witnesses, say Harlan Prater and Logan Matthews at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • Enforcement Takeaways From ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    Although many are calling for sweeping changes to antitrust laws, virtual sessions of the American Bar Association's 69th Antitrust Law Spring Meeting reveal that state and federal enforcers are already able to challenge big tech, acquisitions of small, nascent competitors, and wage-fixing and no-poach agreements, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

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