More Employment Coverage

  • July 30, 2021

    Munger Tolles Helped CEO Prep To Testify In Criminal Trial

    Applied Material Inc.'s current CEO testified during a criminal trial Friday that Munger Tolles & Olson LLP partners, who represent Applied in civil trade secret theft litigation that precedes the criminal case, helped him prepare to testify in the government's criminal case against four former Applied employees.

  • July 30, 2021

    Feds Join Medicare Advantage FCA Suits Against Health Giant

    The federal government said on Friday that it has officially joined in on a half-dozen lawsuits claiming various Kaiser Permanente entities defrauded Medicare Advantage by exaggerating patient illnesses.

  • July 30, 2021

    NCAA To Mull Major Reforms With 'Constitutional Convention'

    The NCAA said Friday it will consider major structural changes to its governance of college sports through a "constitutional convention" after the organization suffered a major defeat at the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this year and has been pushed to allow athletes to be paid for their names, images and likenesses.

  • July 30, 2021

    Lowe's Must Face NJ Suit Over Worker-Customer Skirmish

    A New Jersey state appeals court on Friday revived claims against Lowe's over a physical altercation between a sales associate and a customer, finding that a trial judge should have let jurors decide whether the employee's lack of training led to the incident.

  • July 30, 2021

    5th Circ. Nixes Suit Against Railway Co. Over Severed Fingers

    The Fifth Circuit has thrown out claims by a railroad worker against Norfolk Southern Railway Co. over an accident in which he lost three fingers while working at a Norfolk facility, saying he hasn't shown that the company was his employer.

  • July 30, 2021

    11th Circ. Says VA Benefits Law Doesn't Nix Negligence Claim

    The Eleventh Circuit partly revived a veteran's allegations that Georgia doctors failed to properly diagnose and treat his throat cancer, holding that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs can't duck medical negligence claims under a law protecting its benefits decisions from court review.

  • July 30, 2021

    Mass. Dealerships Say Volvo Shorts Them On Service Pay

    A pair of Massachusetts Volvo dealers Thursday accused the Swedish automaker of underpaying them for maintenance they perform under prepaid service plans in violation of a Bay State law designed to level the playing field between dealerships and powerful manufacturers.

  • July 29, 2021

    Lawmakers Unveil Overhaul Of Judiciary Workplace Rights

    A bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers on Thursday introduced a new comprehensive proposal to provide the 30,000 federal judiciary workers with the same rights and protections against discrimination, sexual harassment and other misconduct afforded to other government workers and those in the private sector.

  • July 29, 2021

    Biden Says Federal Workers Must Get Vaccinated Or Mask Up

    President Joe Biden on Thursday unveiled additional measures to encourage more Americans to get vaccinated, including directing millions of federal employees to get fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or wear a mask on the job and comply with regular testing.

  • July 29, 2021

    Insurer Says Ill. Produce Store's Policy Blocks BIPA Coverage

    Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Co. filed suit Thursday asking a federal judge to declare it has no duty to defend two Illinois produce markets against underlying claims that their time-tracking practices violated a former employee's biometric privacy rights.

  • July 29, 2021

    Ill. Justices Sink Energy Co.'s Suit Over Ex-Execs' Departure

    The Illinois Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a lower court wrongly revived an energy company's claim that two of its former business developers usurped a corporate opportunity for a power plant project because the project ultimately failed.

  • July 29, 2021

    Purdue Pharma Gets OK For $22M Worker Bonus Program

    A New York bankruptcy judge Thursday gave Purdue Pharma the go-ahead to pay up to $22.1 million in retention bonuses to midlevel workers, rejecting calls to delay the decision until after next month's Chapter 11 plan confirmation hearing.

  • July 29, 2021

    Sen. Urges Review Of Nassar's Prison Account Spending

    U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi called Wednesday for the attorney general to review federal prison policies that allowed serial sex abuser Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics doctor, to spend thousands of dollars on himself while failing to pay restitution to victims, calling it an "egregious miscarriage of justice."

  • July 29, 2021

    Pa. Justices Take Up Case Over Workers' Comp Claim Limits

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania agreed to take a rare interlocutory appeal to decide if a former auto shop worker's claims for toxic benzene exposure were barred under the state's workers' compensation law, or if his potentially long-simmering disease could've started early enough to trigger an exemption to that law.

  • July 29, 2021

    NY Fed. Judge Sanctions Atty For 'Gratuitous' Motion Practice

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday sanctioned a plaintiff and her attorney who sued the Department of Labor to release an unredacted email related to an employment dispute, with the judge citing repeated attempts to "obtain in discovery the very relief sought in plaintiff's complaint" and multiple duplicative motions trying to relitigate court orders.

  • July 28, 2021

    McDonald's Workers Lose Cert. Bid In No-Poach Dispute

    An Illinois federal judge declined Wednesday to certify a nationwide class of McDonald's workers challenging no-poach provisions in franchise agreements, finding that the workers weren't all members of the same national labor market.

  • July 28, 2021

    Ex-CEO Laid Off Workers Before Alleged IP Theft, Jury Told

    Applied Materials Inc.'s former CEO took the stand Wednesday in a California federal jury trial over criminal charges that four ex-employees stole trade secrets to launch a startup, testifying that he shut down their division and rejected their pitch to license Applied's IP for $8 million before they allegedly stole it.

  • July 28, 2021

    Senate Votes To Debate $1.2T Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill

    The U.S. Senate voted Wednesday to move forward with debate on an estimated $1.2 trillion infrastructure proposal after a bipartisan group of senators reached a deal earlier in the day on major outstanding issues in a scramble to finalize legislation comprising key parts of President Joe Biden's economic agenda.

  • July 28, 2021

    Reggie Bush Won't Get Heisman Back Despite NCAA Reforms

    Former University of Southern California running back Reggie Bush and others stripped of awards or records by the NCAA for receiving impermissible benefits while in school will not see them restored, despite a recent rule change allowing name, image and likeness pay, the NCAA said Wednesday.

  • July 28, 2021

    DOJ Authorizes Ex-US Atty In Ga. To Discuss Trump Pressure

    The former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia has been authorized by the U.S. Department of Justice to talk to congressional committees about whether former President Donald Trump pressured him and others to challenge the 2020 presidential election results.

  • July 27, 2021

    DOJ Won't Defend GOP Rep. Mo Brooks In Capitol Riot Case

    The U.S. Department of Justice told a D.C. federal court Tuesday that it wouldn't be defending Rep. Mo Brooks in a lawsuit accusing him of helping to incite the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, saying the Alabama Republican hadn't acted within the scope of his office.

  • July 27, 2021

    IP Pirates Or Workers Pushed Overboard? Jury Must Decide

    Prosecutors told a California federal jury during trial openings Tuesday that four former Applied Materials employees stole LCD chip technology trade secrets to launch a startup, while defense counsel said Applied's top brass planned to lay off their division and encouraged them to find investors to fund a spinoff entity.

  • July 27, 2021

    Cohen Weiss Partner Tapped For DOL Benefits Chief

    The Biden administration announced Tuesday that it has nominated Cohen Weiss & Simon LLP partner Lisa Gomez to lead the U.S. Department of Labor's employee benefits unit, which produces and enforces the federal regulations that apply to employer-provided retirement and health care plans.

  • July 27, 2021

    NY Giants GC Rips 'Strangle' Threat Suit As Misleading

    The New York Giants called on a New Jersey state court Tuesday to throw out a fired video director's whistleblower suit over his alleged workplace violence complaints, saying he has misrepresented remarks by the team's general counsel in claiming the executive threatened to "strangle" him if he shared confidential information.

  • July 27, 2021

    Regulator's Conviction Sets Stage For Insurance Fight In Ga.

    The federal fraud conviction of former Georgia insurance commissioner Jim Beck has set the stage for a political fight over who can best steer the state's insurance industry away from corruption and advocate for policyholders.

Expert Analysis

  • Will You Be Ready If Your Class Action Goes To Trial?

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    Despite conventional wisdom, class actions sometimes do go to trial — as TransUnion v. Ramirez, decided last month by the U.S. Supreme Court, illustrates — so attorneys must prepare by studying past class action trials, focusing on how the courts and lawyers approached procedural and evidentiary questions, says Ross Weiner at Risk Settlements.

  • Key I-9 Compliance Steps To Prepare For Office Reopenings

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    Employers should take specific steps before offices reopen to ensure they can timely update employment eligibility verification documents completed remotely amid the pandemic and that their verification protocols can adapt to changing conditions, say Melissa Allchin and Matthew Gorman at Baker McKenzie.

  • Tide Is Turning Against FCA Case Dismissals

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision not to resolve a circuit split over the proper standard for deciding government motions to dismiss whistleblower suits is a Pyrrhic victory for potential defendants, given bipartisan pressure in the Senate and from the White House to reign in such dismissals, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • Benefits For Law Firms Venturing Into New Services

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    By offering more services, law firms can deepen and strengthen their client relationships and truly become an extension of their clients' teams while generating new revenue streams, and while there are risks associated with expanding into consulting, they may be worth it, says Lou Ramos at Major Lindsey.

  • How Anti-Corruption Push Affects US Cos. Operating Abroad

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    A recent Biden administration memo, and an anticipated increase in enforcement related to transnational fraud, money laundering and corruption, means that U.S. companies and financial institutions with operations abroad should take concrete steps to stave off U.S. Department of Justice scrutiny, says Andrey Spektor at Bryan Cave.

  • Green Investments Are Not Immune To ESG Scrutiny

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    As investment informed and motivated by environmental, social and governance considerations accelerates, companies and investors in the green technology sector must keep in mind that regulators, consumers and communities will not grant them free passes on the full range of ESG concerns, say Michael Murphy and Kyle Guest at Gibson Dunn.

  • FCA Relator Pursuit Of DOJ's Declined Cases Is Vital

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    While a recent Law360 guest article suggests that the U.S. Department of Justice consider dismissing all False Claims Act cases it declines, that policy would undermine the FCA's broad remedial purpose of empowering private citizens to combat fraud against the government, say Jacklyn DeMar at Taxpayers Against Fraud Education Fund and Renée Brooker at Tycko & Zavareei.

  • Revamping Law Firm Marketing Lists — With Partner Buy-In

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    Jackson Lewis’ Paige Bowser shares lessons from the firm's recent overhaul of an outdated email marketing database, including tips for getting partners on board, ensuring compliance with privacy laws and augmenting outreach strategies.

  • Recent High Court Decisions Signify 1st Amendment Direction

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recently concluded term saw a flurry of First Amendment cases, providing lessons for how the court, with its 6-3 conservative split, may rule next term on issues of free speech, religious freedom, association rights and more, as questions regarding social media and technological advances loom, says Samuel Mitchell at Michael Best.

  • The Murky World Of Legal Rankings Gets Some Clarity In NJ

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    New Jersey's new, stringent approach to legal rankings will make accolade advertising more transparent, benefiting both attorneys and clients and offering legal marketers a new set of best practices amid evolving standards, say Penny Paul at Lowenstein Sandler and Susan Peters at Greybridge.

  • Embracing ESG: Cigna Counsel Talks Employee Wellness

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    Building employee well-being into corporate environmental, social and governance priorities required our legal team to focus more closely on cross-functional collaboration within the company and increased communication with our board of directors and shareholders, says Julia Brncic at Cigna.

  • Courts' Clashing Standards For Evidence At Class Cert.: Part 2

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    While federal circuits continue to split on whether to approach fact and expert evidence differently at class certification, and there is no sign of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling to resolve the issue, applying an admissibility standard to one and not the other appears illogical, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • Hybrid Work Models Are Key To Gender Parity In Law Firms

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    To curb the historically high rates of attrition among female lawyers, Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks suggest firms must normalize hybrid work schedules, and they recommend best practices to promote engagement among all attorneys, regardless of where they work.