More Employment Coverage

  • April 30, 2021

    Texas Justices Say Injured Man Was Employee, Not Contractor

    A contract between a temporary staffing agency and Waste Management that labels workers as independent contractors isn't enough to defeat evidence that an injured worker suing the company is considered an employee under the Workers' Compensation Act, the Texas Supreme Court held Friday in tossing the suit.

  • April 30, 2021

    ADT Must Face Ex-VP's Whistleblower Suit In NJ

    The New Jersey state appeals court on Friday revived a whistleblower suit brought by a former vice president of security alarm company ADT LLC, ruling that more findings were needed to determine if the ex-employee's arbitration agreement with the company's predecessor was enforceable.

  • April 30, 2021

    Execs Say UK Lacks Authority Over Trade Secret Theft Claims

    Two former Semtech executives accused of conspiring with a British satellite communications company argued on Friday that England has no jurisdiction over the trade secret and copyright claims against them since they had worked for the semiconductor maker in France.

  • April 30, 2021

    Ex-Pats Coach, Foundation Reach Deal In Pay Dispute

    Former New England Patriots assistant coach Bret Bielema and a University of Arkansas booster group have settled fraud claims centering on the coach's contract buyout as part of his dismissal from the school and subsequent role with the NFL franchise, according to a Thursday court filing.

  • April 29, 2021

    Sen. Wyden's Bill Seeks Matching Of Student Loan Payments

    Employers could contribute to employee retirement accounts when workers make payments toward their student loan debts under a bill released Thursday by Sen. Ron Wyden, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

  • April 29, 2021

    Staffing Platform ShiftPixy Files 4 SPACs Exceeding $1B

    Business staffing firm ShiftPixy Inc. filed initial public offerings for four special purpose acquisition companies that would raise $1.25 billion combined, hoping to acquire and take public multiple businesses, under guidance from Loeb & Loeb LLP.

  • April 29, 2021

    Texas Panel Says Drug Testing Co. Owes Duty To Fired Worker

    A Texas appellate court on Thursday revived a lawsuit brought by a pipe fitter who alleged he was wrongly fired after a false positive test result for cocaine, holding that the trade association that collected his biological sample and the laboratory that tested it owed him a duty of care in handling the sample.

  • April 29, 2021

    Jury Clears Drilling Tech Firm In $35M Trade Secrets Suit

    A Houston jury decided Thursday that a former chief engineer for FMC Technologies Inc. did not misappropriate its design drawings when he moved to competing subsea drilling technology firm Dril-Quip Inc.

  • April 29, 2021

    Pa. Justices Bar No-Hire Clauses Between Businesses

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania barred part of an agreement between two Pittsburgh shipping companies that said one company wouldn't hire the other's employees, ruling Thursday that such agreements were unreasonable restrictions of trade.

  • April 29, 2021

    11th Circ. Affirms Tossing Of Defamation Suit Against Fla. Bar

    An attorney disbarred after a dispute about client settlement funds can't sue the Florida Bar for defamation over a grievance letter detailing the underlying allegations, the Eleventh Circuit has held.

  • April 29, 2021

    DOL Chief Says $14B Budget Necessary To Up Enforcement

    The Biden administration's $14.2 billion discretionary funding request for the U.S. Labor Department would help to hire staff to address worker misclassification and other wage issues and policies, agency chief Marty Walsh told a House subcommittee.

  • April 28, 2021

    Ex-Royal Caribbean Employee Keeps Win Over Crushed Hand

    A Florida appeals court Wednesday upheld a former Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. crew member's win in a suit over an accident on board a ship that crushed her hand but sent the case back to the trial court to consider trimming the $20.3 million damages award.

  • April 28, 2021

    Ex-Akerman Partner Returns To Littler In Orlando

    Management-side employment law firm Littler Mendelson PC announced on Tuesday that a former shareholder out of its Orlando office would return this month after a stint at Akerman LLP.

  • April 28, 2021

    Hauser Ends Dispute With Ex-Exec. Over Rival Employment

    Insurance and risk advisory firm Hauser Inc. agreed Wednesday to end its dispute with a former executive over his employment at a rival company, filing a joint stipulation of dismissal without prejudice of the case in a Georgia state court.

  • April 28, 2021

    4th Circ. Keeps Covil's Win In Mesothelioma Death Suit

    The Fourth Circuit let Covil Corp. keep its win in a wrongful death suit alleging that its asbestos products caused a man's death from mesothelioma, finding there was scant evidence to support allegations that Covil's products, and not others, caused the cancer.

  • April 27, 2021

    Houston Jury Asked To Award $35M In Subsea Drilling IP Row

    A Harris County jury began deliberating Tuesday afternoon in a trade secret misappropriation lawsuit in which FMC Technologies Inc. is seeking an award of about $34.6 million against its former chief engineer and the competing subsea drilling technology company he left for.

  • April 27, 2021

    Most Firms Withhold Hard Data In Human Capital Disclosures

    A report released Tuesday shows many public companies have begun complying with new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rules that require more detailed disclosure of workforce information — often dubbed human capital — albeit in minimal fashion.

  • April 27, 2021

    Hedgeye Says Ex-Managing Director Stole Trade Secrets

    Hedgeye Risk Management LLC has launched a trade secret lawsuit in New York federal court accusing a former managing director of stealing the investment research house's financial models and running off to start his own competing business.

  • April 27, 2021

    GOP Sens. Balk At Oil, Gas Tax Hikes For Infrastructure Bill

    Democratic proposals to eliminate the preferential tax treatment afforded to oil and gas companies would be a nonstarter for GOP lawmakers in negotiations with Democrats over a major infrastructure bill, Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee said Tuesday.

  • April 26, 2021

    Photog Says NY Post Fired Him Over Virus PPE Complaint

    A former New York Post photographer claims the tabloid newspaper illegally fired him after he complained about its refusal to provide staff photographers and reporters with protective gear amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Manhattan.

  • April 26, 2021

    SandRidge Asks Texas Justices To Toss Electric Shock Suit

    SandRidge Energy Inc. has asked the Texas Supreme Court to overturn a lower court's decision allowing a contractor who was shocked while working near a live wire to proceed with his suit against the company, arguing it wasn't required to warn the contractor about the live wire.

  • April 26, 2021

    Insurance Exec Barred From Competing With Old Firm

    A former executive for an insurance underwriting firm has been temporarily barred from competing with the company or using any of its information under a Georgia federal court ruling.

  • April 26, 2021

    Ga. Gov. Weighing Candidates For New State Court Judgeship

    Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp is set to select one of three candidates for a newly created Superior Court judge position after a new law added an 11th judge to the Cobb Judicial Circuit. Here, Law360 looks at the Cobb vacancy and the candidates hoping to fill it.

  • April 26, 2021

    High Court Won't Hear DOD Reviewability Doctrine Challenge

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case brought by a class of noncitizen military enlistees Monday, ending their challenge to a now-defunct background check policy as well as arguments around when courts may review U.S. Department of Defense policy.

  • April 26, 2021

    Justices Won't Let Texas Sue Calif. In Religious Liberty Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected Texas' bid to file a suit challenging California's policy blocking state employees from traveling on taxpayers' dime to states with laws deemed to be anti-LGBTQ, despite Texas' claim that its ability to protect its citizens' religious liberty was being trampled.

Expert Analysis

  • The Case For Diversity In Internal Investigation Teams

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    Teams that represent differing backgrounds can uniquely strengthen internal investigation processes with more thorough deliberation, better interviewee trust-building and more effective problem-solving, so law firms and clients alike must avoid the natural impulse to select homogenous groups, say Karin Portlock and Jabari Julien at Gibson Dunn.

  • Ariz. Workers' Comp Opinion May Apply To COVID-19 Stress

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    The Arizona Supreme Court's recent decision about post-traumatic stress disorder in France v. Industrial Commission of Arizona may open the door for employees in the state to receive workers' compensation benefits for mental injuries caused by the stresses associated with forced telework amid COVID-19, says Ryan Heath at Gilson Daub.

  • 5 Ways Outside Counsel Can Impress Their Clients

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    Attorneys can build lasting relationships with corporate clients by thinking of in-house counsel as project partners, adhering to a few basic communication principles and thinking beyond legal advice, says Gerry Caron, chief counsel for safety, health and environment at Cabot.

  • Pa. Tax Talk: Who Can Get A Philadelphia Wage Tax Refund

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    The specifics of Philadelphia-based employers' remote work policies during the pandemic will have a significant effect on employees' abilities to collect city wage tax refunds and on the future of the wage tax itself, says Jennifer Karpchuk at Chamberlain Hrdlicka.

  • IRS Should Level The Field For R&D Tax Credits

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    A recent increase in denials of research and development tax credits to small businesses in the architectural, engineering and construction community shows the Internal Revenue Service should issue new guidance to ensure a fair playing field and an opportunity to continue innovating in the U.S., says Julio Gonzalez at Engineered Tax Services.

  • Ethics Tips For Attorneys Telecommuting Across State Lines

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    Attorneys working remotely from jurisdictions in which they are not admitted should take precautionary steps to avoid engaging in unauthorized practice of law, say John Schmidt and Michael Seaman at Phillips Lytle.

  • For Trucking Accident Plaintiffs, Access To Evidence Is Key

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    The country is relying more than ever on the trucking industry during the COVID-19 pandemic, but when trucking companies fail to properly manage drivers, plaintiffs attorneys can use statutes that enforce access to evidence to obtain justice for accident victims, says Sam Coffey at Coffey Trial Law.

  • Inside DC Bar's New Guidance On Multiple Representation

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    The D.C. Bar recently cleared the way for lawyers to represent both a party and a witness in the same case in guidance that could prove influential as multiple representation in employment cases becomes increasingly common, says Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • 6 Ways Legal Employers Can Help Pandemic-Weary Parents

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    Parenting during the pandemic has introduced a series of competing personal and professional obligations for attorneys and professional staff, and even organizations that are supportive of their parent employees can take steps to do better, says Meredith Kahan at Saul Ewing.

  • How Cos. Can Weather Growing DOJ Labor Antitrust Scrutiny

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    In light of of the U.S. Department of Justice's increasing antitrust scrutiny of labor markets and President Joe Biden's vow to eliminate most noncompetes, companies should customize their compliance plans and review employee agreements to mitigate risk, say Eric Grannon and Adam Acosta at White & Case.

  • Pandemic Force Majeure Interpretations May Be Shifting

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    A New York federal court's ruling in JN Contemporary Art v. Phillips Auctioneers, deeming COVID-19 to be a natural disaster that triggers a force majeure clause, appears to loosen previously strict contours of contractual interpretation and could create a legal quandary for obligees, say Kimberly Daily and Matthew Rawlinson at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Renewable Energy Cos. Need New Risk Management Tools

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    As President Joe Biden seeks to ramp up renewable energy development, the industry's risk managers must not only rely on traditional insurance and contractual warranties, but also explore new risk management products like proxy revenue swaps, say Leslie Thorne and Andrew Van Osselaer at Haynes and Boone.

  • Inside The Immigration Reform Bill's Business Provisions

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    Provisions in the recently introduced U.S. Citizenship Act that aim to reduce the employment-based green card backlog and attract STEM students are welcome business immigration reforms, but the business community is skeptical of its more restrictive provisions, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

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