More Employment Coverage

  • May 13, 2022

    States Say Purdue CEO Should Answer For Opioid Crisis Role

    A group of state attorneys general have once again objected to proposed bonus payments for Purdue Pharma LP's CEO, telling a New York bankruptcy judge that he was a part of the corporate culture that led to the national opioid crisis.

  • May 13, 2022

    DOL Urged Not To Collect Climate Risk Data From Pensions

    The Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association and the American Bankers Association are among the groups urging the U.S. Department of Labor not to require climate-risk-related reporting from retirement plans and pensions, arguing that the plans already screen for a host of risks and that the reporting would introduce undue costs. 

  • May 13, 2022

    Law Firm Beats Ex-Trading Firm Worker's Leaked Info Suit

    An Illinois appellate court has affirmed the dismissal of a former trading firm executive's legal malpractice suit against a law firm he claims should be on the hook for disclosing the confidential information that led to him being sued by his former employer.

  • May 13, 2022

    Soccer Promoter Blasts Gibson Dunn's $300K Fee Request

    A co-founder of the soccer promotion company run by Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross urged a New York federal judge on Friday to deny Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP's "outrageous" bid to recoup more than $300,000 in attorney fees in an ongoing employment row.

  • May 13, 2022

    No Redo On Designer's Copyright Claim Against CBD Co.

    A Colorado magistrate judge on Friday denied a designer's bid to revive her copyright infringement claims against Pure Spectrum CBD LLC, saying that her motion failed to show why the judge should reconsider a January summary judgment order throwing the claims out.

  • May 13, 2022

    NY Bill Seeks Labor Requirements For Biz Property Tax Break

    New York would establish local labor requirements as part of the approval process to receive a real property tax business investment exemption under a bill introduced in the state Senate.

  • May 13, 2022

    9th Circ. Affirms Gap Diversity Suit Toss Over Forum Clause

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday affirmed a lower court's dismissal of a shareholder's derivative suit accusing Gap Inc. of failing to uphold its commitment to diversity and inclusion, finding that the shareholder brought the case to the wrong forum and should have sued in Delaware Chancery Court.

  • May 12, 2022

    Subcontractor Can't Bring Coverage Appeal To 2nd Circ.

    A New York federal judge refused a subcontractor's request to let it appeal the court's decision awarding partial summary judgment to insurers in a coverage dispute over a 2018 construction crane accident, with the judge also declining to reconsider her ruling on the scope of an employers liability exclusion.

  • May 12, 2022

    Major Lindsey Must Face Trimmed Suit Over Pillsbury Atty Fee

    Major Lindsey & Africa largely lost its bid to end a legal recruiting boutique's suit over a $375,000 placement fee for a partner who landed at Pillsbury when a Manhattan federal judge said Thursday the boutique's declaration bid should have targeted Pillsbury while allowing its tortious interference claim to proceed.

  • May 12, 2022

    Miss. Justices Say Geico Has No Duty In Worker Crash Suit

    An employee cannot gain coverage under their auto policy's uninsured motorist provisions if their at-fault employer has immunity under the state's workers' compensation law, the Mississippi Supreme Court unanimously ruled Thursday, declining to overturn precedent first established in 1993.

  • May 12, 2022

    Judge Won't Dismiss Label Co. From Trade Secret Suit

    An Arkansas federal judge refused to toss claims that a Texas-based company's owner took part in a scheme to steal confidential information from a graphic design business, finding the court had jurisdiction at this point in the case.

  • May 12, 2022

    LA Biz Wins $156K Verdict In Fireproofing Patent Saga

    A Los Angeles metals company has convinced a jury to find that a business connected to one of its former employees must pay at least $156,000 for infringing patents covering a material that's used in new construction to limit the spread of fires.

  • May 12, 2022

    Red Sox Network Rips Fired Exec For 'Senseless' Countersuit

    The broadcaster of the Boston Red Sox blasted a former vice president on Thursday for bringing "utterly senseless and insupportable counterclaims" after he was fired, hit with a civil suit and indicted for allegedly stealing $575,000 from the network.

  • May 12, 2022

    Co. Is Covered For CEO's Alleged Harassment, 9th Circ. Told

    A digital marketing company said it is owed insurance coverage for allegations that its principal sexually harassed an employee, telling the Ninth Circuit that a lower court erred in finding that the disputed claim was related to a previous harassment claim that its policy expressly excluded.

  • May 11, 2022

    Ex-Sleep Number Execs Can't File For Patents, 8th Circ. Says

    The Eighth Circuit agreed Wednesday with a federal judge in Minnesota, Sleep Number's home state, who blocked two former executives of the mattress giant from going to the patent office with ideas about using beds to monitor biometric data, ideas they allegedly signed away half a decade ago.

  • May 11, 2022

    Calif. Univ. Gets Win In Native American Remains Case

    A California federal judge has tossed a suit by a San Jose State University anthropology professor alleging school officials retaliated against her for writing a book opposing laws that require the return of human remains and cultural items to Native American tribes, while giving the professor a chance to fix claims that don't involve the interests of a local tribe.

  • May 11, 2022

    DC Circuit Backs FAA Over 'Shy-Bladder' Drug Test Spat

    The D.C. Circuit supported the Federal Aviation Administration's bid to revoke a pilot's certifications after the National Transportation Safety Board handed him a 180-day suspension for allegedly refusing to take a drug test, saying the board contradicted federal regulations and the pilot's "shy-bladder" test arguments were unpersuasive.

  • May 11, 2022

    Offit Kurman Expanding In NC By Adding Six-Atty Firm

    Maryland-based Offit Kurman Attorneys At Law announced Tuesday that it will absorb North Carolina boutique firm Hagan Barrett PLLC, picking up the smaller firm's six attorneys and expanding to Greensboro with its 18th office.

  • May 11, 2022

    Judge Tosses Racial Discrimination Suit Against NJ State Bar

    The former assistant general counsel and director of diversity initiatives for the New Jersey State Bar Association is considering appealing the dismissal of the racial discrimination claims she brought against the association alleging that she was paid less than her white colleagues because of her race.

  • May 11, 2022

    AT&T Workers Urge 9th Circ. To Revive Sweeping ERISA Suit

    Workers who claim AT&T burdened its $35 billion retirement plan with excessive fees told the Ninth Circuit that it should revive their 250,000-member class action, arguing that the telecommunications company failed to keep an eye on how much the plan's record-keeper was paid for its services.

  • May 11, 2022

    Tully Rinckey Adds Labor Litigator As Senior Counsel

    Tully Rinckey PLLC has hired a labor and employment attorney from Amabile & Erman PC as senior counsel, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • May 11, 2022

    FordHarrison Adds Employment Law Atty As Partner In NJ

    FordHarrison LLP recently brought on a former plaintiffs lawyer as a partner in New Jersey to bolster the firm's employment law services for its clients in management.

  • May 11, 2022

    Ex-Latham Litigator Joins Brown Neri Smith & Khan In LA

    Brown Neri Smith & Khan LLP has added another ex-Latham & Watkins LLP litigator as partner in the Los Angeles firm.

  • May 10, 2022

    Foreign Pot Workers Not Barred From US, CBP Memo Says

    A 2018 U.S. Customs and Border Protection document recently disclosed amid a lawsuit filed by Davis Wright Tremaine LLP indicates that foreign nationals working in legal cannabis industries aren't inadmissible to the U.S., despite statements to the contrary from CBP officials.

  • May 10, 2022

    Full 4th Circ. To Eye $680M FCA Case Against Allergan

    Judges on the Fourth Circuit voted Tuesday to take up a split ruling the court issued earlier this year that ended a False Claims Act case from a now-deceased worker at an Allergan subsidiary who claimed the company fraudulently reported drug prices to Medicaid in order to skim the federal government out of least $680 million.

Expert Analysis

  • Remote Hearings Are Ill-Suited Default For Litigation Realities

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    A recent Law360 guest article suggests that remote proceedings should be the default in civil litigation even after the pandemic, but courts should continue to give parties the option to appear in person because it can actually save long-term costs, prepare younger attorneys more effectively, and bring a necessary degree of seriousness to hearings, says Mark​ Eisen at Benesch Friedlander.

  • Simplifying Tax Issues For Nonresident Athletes In Canada

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    Tax compliance can be particularly challenging for nonresident professional athletes playing in Canada, but as NHL contract negotiations approach a close, it's worth looking at some ways the tax burden can be mitigated, say Marie-France Dompierre and Marc Pietro Allard at Davies Ward.

  • Remote Hearings Should Be The Default In Civil Litigation

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    The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure impose an affirmative duty on courts to eliminate undue cost, so remote hearings should be the default in civil litigation even after the pandemic, while in-person hearings must justify their existence, says Joshua Sohn at the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Nev. Filing Hints At DOJ's Employee-Noncompete Stance

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    A recent U.S. Department of Justice statement of interest in a Nevada case involving anesthesiologists offers insight into how the agency might evaluate the use of noncompete agreements when the employer could be viewed as having market power in a labor market or its noncompete agreements affect an appreciable portion of a market, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Attorneys Today Need To Depose Like There's No Tomorrow

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    With people leaving the workforce in droves amid the “Great Resignation” and with younger workers less inclined to stay in one place for long, attorneys need to adjust their deposition strategies to minimize risks of losing crucial witnesses who may move on from a client or opponent company before a case goes to trial, say Anthony Argiropoulos and Maximilian Cadmus at Epstein Becker.

  • Parsing Recent DOJ Statements On Monopolistic Conduct

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    Andre Geverola and Javier Ortega at Arnold & Porter provide context for the U.S. Justice Department's recent statements on enforcement against monopolistic conduct, as well as guidance on how the DOJ is likely to focus its attention moving forward.

  • How DC Federal Court Ruling Limits Wire Fraud Act Scope

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    The recent D.C. federal court decision U.S. v. Guertin, holding that a scheme to maintain a preexisting salary does not constitute obtaining money or property under the wire fraud statute, reinforces the act's textual limitations and curbs prosecutorial overreach, say Ashwin Ram and Galen Kast at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • After Ill. Ruling, Trucking Cos. Must Review Biometric Policies

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in McDonald v. Symphony Bronzeville Park, upholding an employee's right to sue her employer for collecting biometric data without written permission, serves as a compliance warning to trucking companies, who are especially reliant on biometric identifiers, say attorneys at MG+M.

  • A Guide To DHS' Work-On-Arrival Policy For Visa Dependents

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    In light of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's new policy effectively allowing spouses of L and E visa holders to work in the U.S. immediately upon entry, employers should adjust their I-9 verification procedures to avoid unlawful discrimination, and qualifying dependents should be aware of best practices, says Andrew Greenfield at Fragomen.

  • How Attorneys Can Ethically Terminate A Client Relationship

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    As illustrated by Dentons’ recent request to withdraw from its representation of a casino mogul in Bartlit Beck v. Okada, terminating client relationships prematurely can be tricky and met with skepticism in the courts, but following certain best practices can make the process a little less painful for everyone involved, says Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight.

  • When Presuit Demands Cross The Line To Extortion

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    A California appellate court’s recent decision in Falcon Brands v. Mousavi & Lee clarifies the difference between aggressive settlement posturing and criminal extortion, reminding attorneys to be careful not to threaten adverse actions unrelated to a client's allegations when making prelitigation monetary demands, say attorneys at Michelman & Robinson.

  • The Key To Turning Solid Briefs Into Winning Briefs

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    Even a well-written brief can omit key facts, make tone-deaf legal arguments or ignore practical implications, so lawyers drafting motions and appeals should incorporate feedback processes akin to moot courts and jury research, says Andrew Nichols at Charis Lex.

  • Steps For Universities As DOJ Shifts Foreign Influence Policy

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    Notwithstanding Wednesday's U.S. Department of Justice announcement terminating the initiative targeting Chinese influence and raising the bar for criminal prosecutions, universities should ensure their compliance controls meet new disclosure standards and that they can efficiently respond to inquiries about employees' foreign connections, say attorneys at Covington.

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