More Employment Coverage

  • August 18, 2022

    Consulting Firm Beats Fired Exec's Severance Lawsuit

    A California federal judge threw out a Gartner executive's case claiming he was owed severance after being booted from his role for allegedly creating a toxic work environment, ruling that the consulting firm is within its rights to withhold severance for those fired over performance issues.

  • August 18, 2022

    Littler Pulls TRO Bid Against Polsinelli In IP Case Mid-Hearing

    Littler Mendelson PC withdrew its motion for a temporary restraining order against Polsinelli PC at the start of the second day of a two-day hearing in a Georgia federal court on Thursday, after the judge overseeing the trade secrets misappropriation case said the motion wasn't specific enough.

  • August 18, 2022

    Long Island Woman Stole $4 Million From Employer, Feds Say

    A Massapequa, New York, woman was charged Tuesday with embezzling about $4 million from her entertainment industry company and its clients in Manhattan in a scheme prosecutors say spanned about seven years.

  • August 17, 2022

    Ga. Judge Sees Flaw In Littler TRO Bid Against Polsinelli

    Littler Mendelson PC's bid to block Polsinelli PC from using its alleged trade secrets for a home care practice needs to be more specific in order to succeed, a Georgia federal judge said Wednesday during the first day of a two-day hearing.

  • August 17, 2022

    10th Circ. Revives Part Of Poaching Suit Against Cherokee Co.

    The Tenth Circuit on Wednesday partly revived an information technology company's suit against several former employees over a federal contract competition, including claims they breached their duty of loyalty when they moved to the Cherokee Nation consulting firm that ended up winning the contract.

  • August 17, 2022

    Gov't Ordered To Reimburse NY Hospital $1.7M In Atty Fees

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims ordered the government to reimburse NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital $1.7 million in attorney fees for defending itself against doctors who claimed their payroll taxes were wrongly withheld and eventually settled.

  • August 17, 2022

    Puerto Rico Fiscal Board Makes Case For Highway Reorg Plan

    Puerto Rico's fiscal oversight board Wednesday asked a New York federal judge to approve its $5.5 billion restructuring plan for the island's Highways and Transportation Authority, saying the plan has overwhelming support from the agency's creditors.

  • August 17, 2022

    Feds Explore Making Virtual I-9 Verification Permanent

    The Biden administration is looking into creating permanent programs that would allow employers to use email, video and other technologies to remotely verify their employees' eligibility to work in the U.S., according to a proposed rule released on Wednesday.

  • August 17, 2022

    Judge Axes Russian Internet Co.'s Claims Against Ex-Workers

    Former employees of major Russian internet portal Rambler can escape allegations over a web server software they sold for $670 million to F5 Networks, as a California federal judge found that several of the claims against them were time-barred.

  • August 17, 2022

    COVID Deaths At Mass. Vets' Home Spark Whistleblower Suit

    Two former Massachusetts health care officials claimed in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that they were fired after flagging concerns about pandemic conditions in a pair of veterans' nursing facilities, including one where a COVID-19 outbreak killed 76 people.

  • August 16, 2022

    'Sea Change In The Law': Inside One Firm's Post-Roe Practice

    The U.S. Supreme Court's nullification of the constitutional right to abortion has ushered in "transformative" changes for health care attorneys and become one of the rare events to which entirely new practice groups can be devoted, the leaders of a boutique health firm's post-Roe v. Wade practice told Law360.

  • August 16, 2022

    GE And Canon Reach $350K Settlement In Data Breach Suit

    General Electric Co. and a Canon Inc. subsidiary that GE used to store benefits files have agreed to pay GE employees whose financial information was exposed in a 2020 data breach up to $3,500 each out of a pool of $350,000 to end litigation filed in the wake of the episode.

  • August 16, 2022

    Del. Court Reverses Goldman Sachs Pay Suit Settlement

    The Delaware Supreme Court said Tuesday a settlement Goldman Sachs Group reached with serial litigant shareholder Shiva Stein in a five-year lawsuit alleging excessive director pay contained overbroad, forward-looking releases and should not have been approved, reversing and remanding the Chancery Court's approval of the settlement.

  • August 16, 2022

    Investors Fight Ga. Flooring Giant Bid To Toss Securities Suit

    Investors in Georgia-based flooring giant Mohawk Industries Inc. have pushed back against its attempt to dismiss their securities fraud case as time-barred and poorly pled, urging a Georgia federal judge to follow in a colleague's footsteps and allow their claims to proceed.

  • August 16, 2022

    DC Circ. Affirms Judiciary Workers' Right To Political Activity

    A federal judiciary policy forbidding employees from championing political candidates and parties outside of work and organizing to support their campaigns violates the First Amendment, the D.C. Circuit ruled Tuesday.

  • August 16, 2022

    NY Judge OKs $945K Arbitration Award For Ex-CKR Atty

    A New York state judge has signed off on a $945,000 arbitration award that went in favor of a former crypto-focused lawyer and against CKR Law LLP and its managing partner.

  • August 16, 2022

    Mass. Health Network, Insurer Settle Over Scientist's Award

    A Massachusetts health care network has resolved a suit against its secondary insurer for refusing to help cover a $20 million judgment in favor of a cancer scientist, according to an order issued Tuesday in Boston federal court.

  • August 16, 2022

    Ex-Seyfarth Partner Sues Firm Retirement Plan Over Benefits

    A former partner has hit Seyfarth Shaw LLP's retirement plan with a lawsuit in California federal court over approximately $200,000 in benefits to which he says he is entitled, but the plan has refused to pay.

  • August 16, 2022

    Feds Fight To Keep Lone Conviction In ADI Trade Secret Case

    Prosecutors argued to preserve a former Analog Devices Inc. engineer's lone-count conviction in a case alleging he stole the prototype design of the company's microchip and used it to start a competitor, according to a motion filed Monday.

  • August 16, 2022

    Texas Engineer Wants To Ax Fraud Charges From Indictment

    An engineer has pressed a Texas federal court to throw out fraud charges over an alleged scheme to steal a research firm's business, saying federal prosecutors overreached by charging him with fraud for what he calls a "routine" private omission to his boss.

  • August 16, 2022

    Pa. Justices OK Pension For Ex-Judge Who Lied To FBI

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that former Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Joseph O'Neill was wrongly denied his pension after resigning in the wake of his guilty plea to lying to federal agents investigating a fellow judge.

  • August 15, 2022

    LA County DA Gascón Defeats 2nd Recall Election Attempt

    Proponents of the latest effort to recall Los Angeles County District Attorney George Gascón have once again failed to collect enough valid signatures for a recall election, the L.A. County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk said Monday.

  • August 15, 2022

    Fed. Claims Tosses IT Co.'s Suit Over H-1B Visa Petitions Rule

    A Court of Federal Claims judge on Friday dismissed a suit brought by a group of information technology service companies accusing U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services of illegally raking in hundreds of millions of dollars in fees for workers already in the country who apply for H-1B visa status.

  • August 15, 2022

    Insurer Must Cover Models' $1.4M Win Against Adult Clubs

    A Texas federal judge said a Munich Re unit must cover a $1.4 million judgment awarded to 16 models who accused the owners of three adult nightclubs of misappropriating their photos for advertisements, finding that two exclusions in consecutive policies are not applicable.

  • August 15, 2022

    Polsinelli Fights Littler TRO Bid In Trade Secrets Case

    Polsinelli PC is fighting back against Littler Mendelson PC's bid to bar Polsinelli from using 30,000 client files the firm obtained when it poached a Littler attorney last year, calling the request a thinly veiled anti-competitive ploy in the pair's ongoing feud over home health care business.

Expert Analysis

  • 2 FCA Settlements Highlight Gov't Cyber Liability Focus

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    Recent False Claims Act settlements with Comprehensive Health Care Services and Aerojet Rocketyne illustrate government contractors' growing cybersecurity liability, and underscore how important it is for companies to comply with new incident reporting regulations and live up to standing contractual obligations, say attorneys at O'Melveny.

  • After High Court Ruling, Arbitration May Lose Its Luster

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Morgan v. Sundance, holding that prejudice is not required to waive a party’s right to arbitration, could make arbitration less desirable for defendants, compelling employers to opt for the predictability, safety and cost-effectiveness of the courts, say attorneys Richard Faulkner and Philip Loree.

  • Tips For Employers Preparing For Del. Family Leave Law

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    The recently passed Healthy Delaware Families Act guarantees paid parental, medical and military leave for private sector workers, so employers should take steps to prepare before the law takes effect in 2026, like identifying covered employees and training management, say Michael Truncellito and Monica Simmons at Buchanan Ingersoll.

  • How To Protect Health Care Trade Secrets With Covenants

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    Post-employment restrictive covenants such as noncompetes are an effective way for health companies to protect confidential information and trade secrets, but employers must be cognizant of the rapidly changing state laws governing the enforceability of such agreements, say Erik Weibust and Katherine Rigby at Epstein Becker.

  • Lateral Candidate Screening Steps To Prevent Bad Behavior

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    Bullying and harassment are among the root causes of stress, anxiety and substance abuse in the legal profession, so law firms should take four actions to effectively screen lateral candidates and ensure they are not recruiting individuals who could jeopardize the well-being of their people, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • Preventing Workplace Violence Is Not Just For The Oscars

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    Will Smith slapping Chris Rock at the Oscars holds important legal lessons for companies seeking to maintain a safe workplace and mitigate liability risk as occupational violence continues to rise, say Sarah Sawyer and Russell Berger at Offit Kurman.

  • A Look At The Legal Profession Since Murder Of George Floyd

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    Little has changed for Black attorneys since law firms promised to combat discrimination within the profession following George Floyd's murder, but on this second anniversary of his death, law firms can recommit by adopting specific strategies that set their Black lawyers up for success, say Lisa Davis and Khasim Lockhart at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Guides On Noncompete Agreement Timing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent decision in Rouses Enterprises v. Clapp, holding that an employment relationship must be official before an employee is required to sign a noncompete agreement, highlights employer best practices for drafting and executing restrictive covenants that are enforceable under varying state laws, says Andrew Albritton at McGlinchey Stafford.

  • NY Ruling Correctly Deems Legal Finance Docs Irrelevant

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    A New York appeals court's recent decision in Worldview Entertainment v. Woodrow joins a growing trend of decisions denying discovery of litigation funding documents, highlighting that commercial legal finance should be treated just like any other financing in commercial litigation, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Addressing Low Response Rates In Expert Surveys

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    While expert witnesses are receiving dwindling responses to the surveys they conduct to gauge public beliefs and attitudes, recent cases show that a low response rate need not make a survey inadmissible in court, say Kristen Backor and Yamimi Jena at Charles River Associates, and Brandon Duke at Winston & Strawn.

  • 10 Tips For An Effective BYOD And Remote Access Policy

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    Jason Pill at Phelps Dunbar lays out considerations for employee bring-your-own-device and remote access policies, particularly as remote work becomes more common and in light of new standards set by the recently passed Cyber Incident Reporting for Critical Infrastructure Act.

  • Worker Migration Calls For Fla., NY Employment Law Review

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    Newly remote employees who left New York for Florida during the pandemic should consider the applicable state noncompete laws, because restrictive covenants in employment agreements can seriously affect an employee's post-termination options, say Yaniv Adar and Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

  • Employer Travel Benefits Options For Abortion Care Post-Roe

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    Given the likelihood that Roe v. Wade will be overturned, and with the proliferation of state legislation restricting abortion access, employers may want to consider the legal implications of several options to expand travel reimbursement benefits for employees who seek abortion services, say Danita Merlau and Ben Conley at Seyfarth.

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