More Employment Coverage

  • June 02, 2021

    Piping Repair Co. Hit With $222M Verdict Over Scalding Death

    A Texas jury has hit piping repair and maintenance company Team Industrial Services Inc. with a $222 million verdict in a suit alleging it failed to repair a faulty relief valve, leading to a worker being scalded with superheated steam, resulting in his death.

  • June 02, 2021

    DNA Co. Says Calif. Standards Wrongly Used To Trim Suit

    A DNA-sequencing business is defending its challenge of a lower court order that tossed most of the claims in a trade secret lawsuit it launched, telling the Ninth Circuit that the decision wrongly relied on California civil procedure to dismiss federal claims.

  • June 02, 2021

    Full 1st Circ. To Decide If NH Speaker Can Bar Virtual Votes

    The full First Circuit will reexamine a panel ruling that said the speaker of the New Hampshire House could be sued for refusing to allow virtual votes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • June 01, 2021

    DOL Says Pa. Paper Co. Illegally Fired Worker For OSHA Probe

    The U.S. Department of Labor hit a paper box manufacturer and its owner with a lawsuit in Pennsylvania federal court Tuesday, alleging management illegally fired an employee who repeatedly asked her supervisor for safety gloves, because they believed she had reported the business to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 

  • June 01, 2021

    Senate OKs More Funding For CFTC Whistleblower Program

    The U.S. Senate on Friday gave the green light to the creation of a temporary second account to house funds for the Commodities Futures Trading Commission's whistleblower program, a move that would allow it to continue operating at a financially precarious time for the office.

  • June 01, 2021

    DynCorp Wants $35M FCA Overcharging Case Tossed

    DynCorp International has urged a Texas federal court to end a case accusing the company of fraudulently overcharging the Army under a massive logistics contract, saying the government had signed off on the subcontractor agreement that led to the alleged overbilling.

  • June 01, 2021

    Baker Botts Nabs Benefits Partner From Thompson & Knight

    Baker Botts LLP welcomed a new partner to its executive compensation and benefits practice group Tuesday, bringing on an attorney who most recently spent 11 years as a partner at Thompson & Knight LLP and will work out of the firm's Dallas office.

  • June 01, 2021

    Rig Worker Tells Court Devon Energy Must Face Injury Suit

    A rig worker injured in New Mexico has urged a Texas appellate court to uphold a ruling that Devon Energy Corp. has sufficient contacts with the Lone Star State to give its courts authority over his injury claims despite the location of the accident.

  • June 01, 2021

    Jurors To Hear About Whistleblower's Lost Texts, Judge Says

    A Pennsylvania federal judge said during a hearing Tuesday that potential jurors in a False Claims Act case against Gilead Sciences Inc. would have to be told about the tens of thousands of text messages that, inadvertently or not, were deleted from a whistleblower's cellphones.

  • June 01, 2021

    AlixPartners Calls Alleged File Theft Loss 'Incalculable' In Trial

    The head of AlixPartners LLP's Italian unit, AlixPartners SRL, testified in Delaware's Chancery Court on Monday that a fired managing director accused of stealing more than 133,000 sensitive files before leaving in 2019 may have caused "incalculable" damage to the New York-based global consulting business.

  • June 01, 2021

    Amazon's 'Bad Faith' Claim Against NY AG Faces Doubts

    Amazon's claim that the New York attorney general sued it over COVID-19 worker protections in bad faith drew skepticism Tuesday from a Brooklyn federal judge, who suggested the case may be moot as the pandemic fades.

  • June 01, 2021

    Software Co. Says Rival Stole Clients And Confidential Info

    A software engineering company has accused a former business partner and employee of stealing confidential client information and deleting files from the company's computer network while starting a rival business, according to a suit filed Friday in Georgia federal court.

  • May 28, 2021

    Law360 Names 2021's Top Attorneys Under 40

    We're pleased to announce Law360's Rising Stars for 2021, our list of 180 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments transcend their age.

  • May 28, 2021

    GOP Introduces Bill That Would Ban Federal Vaccine Passport

    A group of Republican senators introduced a bill on Friday that would ban the federal implementation of so-called COVID-19 vaccine passports and prohibit the government from working with third parties to establish their own vaccine passports.

  • May 28, 2021

    US Bars Chinese Fishing Co. Over Forced Labor At Sea

    U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas and U.S. Customs and Border Protection acting Commissioner Troy Miller announced the blacklisting of Dalian Ocean Fishing Co. Ltd. on Friday, based on evidence that the company has used forced labor in its fishing operations.

  • May 28, 2021

    Legal Recruiter Can't DQ Old Co.'s Atty In Trade Theft Suit

    A federal magistrate judge has denied a legal recruiter's bid to disqualify his former company's counsel in a trade secrets suit, ruling that while the attorney may have to now be a witness at the trial, disqualifying him from pretrial proceedings would be premature.

  • May 28, 2021

    Koning Zollar Adds New Partner To Calif. Employment Practice

    San Diego-based firm Koning Zollar LLP nabbed a former in-house counsel to a data and analytics company to fill out the firm's employment practice.

  • May 27, 2021

    Navistar Settles Marine Corps Fraud Case For $50M

    Navistar Defense has agreed to a $50 million settlement to resolve claims it used fraudulent pricing data to drive up the price the U.S. Marine Corps paid for armored vehicle components, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • May 27, 2021

    Appeals Court Clears Way For Firing Of Boston's Top Cop

    A judge on Massachusetts' intermediate-level appeals court cleared the way Thursday for Boston's mayor to fire the city's police commissioner over decades-old domestic violence allegations, rejecting his argument that he is first entitled to a hearing where he could put witnesses under oath and clear his name.

  • May 27, 2021

    Perella Weinberg Bid For Early Win Faces Doubt In Poach Suit

    A New York state judge on Thursday voiced doubt about asset management firm Perella Weinberg Partners LLC's attempt to claim a pretrial victory in its lawsuit against former partners who left the firm after an alleged conspiracy to steal the firm's entire financial restructuring group.

  • May 27, 2021

    Ex-Gilead Workers Hit Back With Sanctions Bid In FCA Fight

    After being repeatedly targeted over missing text messages sought by Gilead Science Inc. during discovery, a pair of whistleblowers in a case against the drugmaker in Pennsylvania federal court have launched a sanctions bid of their own alleging that the company failed to maintain messages on employee cellphones.

  • May 26, 2021

    Oberweis Dairy Hit With Biometric Finger Scan Claims

    Oberweis Dairy has been hit with a proposed class state court suit claiming the company has collected, stored and used its Illinois employees' scanned fingerprint data to track their work time, in violation of their biometric rights.

  • May 26, 2021

    Fenwick, Latham Steer Ziprecruiter's Direct Listing

    Shares of online job marketplace Ziprecruiter Inc. rose in debut trading following its direct listing Wednesday — joining a recent wave of companies to go public through this alternative to an initial public offering — guided by Fenwick & West LLP and financial advisers' counsel Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • May 26, 2021

    Ohio House OKs Blocking Local Taxes On Teleworkers In 2021

    The Ohio House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would bar cities from imposing income taxes on remote workers for 2021, seeking to partially reverse a law that permitted cities to tax telecommuters during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • May 26, 2021

    Ex-Staffing Co. Owner Looks To Duck Wage-Fixing Charge

    The former owner of a physical therapist staffing company moved Monday to toss the antitrust charges against him in the government's first criminal wage-fixing case, telling a Texas federal court there's no precedent for criminal charges over that type of activity.

Expert Analysis

  • Showing An Employer's Ability To Pay In Immigrant Petitions

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    Employers can minimize ability-to-pay challenges to their immigrant petitions by considering their timing and tailoring supporting evidence to address questions the U.S. Department of Labor and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services are most likely to ask about their financial circumstances, say Anita Smalley and Douglas Halpert at Hammond Neal.

  • 3 Ways To Plan For A Possible Federal Ban On Noncompetes

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    Following last month's reintroduction of a federal bill seeking to ban or limit the use of employee noncompetes, companies should explore alternative avenues to protect trade secrets, confidential business information, customer goodwill and other legitimate business interests, say Russell Beck and Erika Hahn at Beck Reed.

  • Protecting Trade Secrets In The Remote Workplace

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    A Pennsylvania federal court's recent decision in M3 USA Corp. v. Hart provides guidance for employers on protecting trade secrets when remote employees leave, and highlights associated jurisdictional issues to consider when bringing litigation against a remote employee, say Jeffrey Csercsevits and Kelsey Beerer at Fisher Phillips.

  • Strategies For Fighting Back Against A Rambo Litigator

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    If your opposing counsel is a so-called Rambo litigator, there are ways to turn their scorched-earth litigation tactics and ad hominem attacks into assets that favor your client, says Margeaux Thomas at Thomas Law.

  • Court Erred In Barring Late DOJ Intervention In FCA Case

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    A Tennessee federal court's novel approach in U.S. v. SouthEast Eye Specialists, barring U.S. Department of Justice intervention in a False Claims Act suit, is unsupported the statute, frustrates its purpose, may impede DOJ enforcement and should be rejected, say Catherine Dorsey at Baron & Budd and Jacklyn DeMar at Taxpayers Against Fraud Education Fund.

  • 1 Year Into Pandemic, It's Time To Rethink Law Firm Billing

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    The particular tasks for which a law firm client can expect to be billed have become unpredictable in the era of COVID-19, making flat fees and other alternative fee arrangements more attractive for both in-house and outside counsel, says Jessica Hodkinson at Panasonic.

  • What Companies Should Know About SIGPR Oversight

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    Brian Miller, the special inspector general for pandemic recovery, discusses what companies and attorneys can do to avoid CARES Act fraud, how his team approaches protecting taxpayer money, and some of the challenges and successes SIGPR faced building an agency from the ground up amid a pandemic.

  • Inconsistent COVID Travel Bans Are Hurting The US

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    The current criteria for exceptions to U.S. pandemic-related travel bans — established by the flurry of inconsistent guidance that's been issued, revised, rescinded and resurrected this past year — are irreconcilable, harming U.S. companies, workers and our economy, says Angelo Paparelli at Seyfarth Shaw.

  • How COVID-19 Shifted The Employment Discrimination Terrain

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    When it comes to employment discrimination, the COVID-19 pandemic has transformed the landscape, with companies large and small now facing claims for routine business actions, and employers would do well to plan accordingly, says Sonya Goodwin at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Rogue High Court Citation May Spark Legal Writing Changes

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    Justice Clarence Thomas’ unexpected use of a new citation format in the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Brownback v. King opinion is the most notable citation change in the court's writing in 25 years, and could inspire receptiveness for other innovations in legal writing and beyond, says Carrie Garrison at Porter Wright.

  • Mitigating Risk Amid Layoff-Driven Confidential Witness Boom

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    Corporate counsel should proactively allay risk stemming from securities fraud plaintiffs' use of confidential witnesses, which could become more common against the backdrop of pandemic-induced layoffs, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Pleading Tortious Interference Claims In Calif. After Ixchel

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    Last August, the California Supreme Court ruled in Ixchel v. Biogen that claims for tortious interference with at-will agreements require evidence of independent wrongful acts, and in the decision's wake we are already seeing indications that motions to dismiss such claims may become more successful, say Amanda Main and Tijana Brien at Cooley.

  • The Case For Diversity In Internal Investigation Teams

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    Teams that represent differing backgrounds can uniquely strengthen internal investigation processes with more thorough deliberation, better interviewee trust-building and more effective problem-solving, so law firms and clients alike must avoid the natural impulse to select homogenous groups, say Karin Portlock and Jabari Julien at Gibson Dunn.

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