More Employment Coverage

  • May 20, 2021

    NY Giants GC Threatened To 'Strangle' Employee, Suit Alleges

    The New York Giants were hit with a whistleblower lawsuit in New Jersey state court Thursday from a fired video director claiming the NFL team's general counsel threatened to "strangle" him if he spoke up about an alleged physical assault he witnessed at work.

  • May 20, 2021

    Texas Chemical Co. Says Ex-Staffer, Rival Stole Trade Secrets

    A chemical company says in Georgia state court one of its former sales leaders violated non-compete and confidentiality agreements by stealing information and bringing it to a rival company in a plot to keep an edge in the polymer market. 

  • May 20, 2021

    Elk Petroleum Ch. 11 Trustee Sues Execs For 'Gross' Failures

    A Chapter 11 litigation trustee for remnants of Elk Petroleum Inc. and its affiliates has sued four former top officers in Delaware's bankruptcy court on eight counts seeking damages ranging from $2.5 million to $32 million for financial "pilfering" and "gross" pre-bankruptcy governance failures.

  • May 20, 2021

    Staffing Biz Workrise Lands $300M Series E Financing

    Energy and infrastructure industry staffing business Workrise said Thursday it closed on a $300 million Series E funding round that included investors such as Baillie Gifford, Andreessen Horowitz and Franklin Templeton.

  • May 19, 2021

    Gov't Urges 9th Circ. To End Sex Assault Suit Against General

    The federal government urged the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to overturn a decision allowing a former Army colonel to pursue sexual assault claims against the Pentagon's second-highest-ranking officer, saying a bar on claims considered incident to military service should apply.

  • May 19, 2021

    Texas Gov.'s Mask Stance Won't Shift Employer Safety Plans

    Although the governor of Texas has issued a series of orders easing government-imposed COVID-19 restrictions, private employers are still likely to be cautious about worker safety, particularly in light of federal requirements to provide safe workplaces.

  • May 19, 2021

    Ill. Justices Skeptical Of Jury's $1M Negligent Training Award

    The Illinois Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed unsure whether it should restore a driver's $1 million injury award after a jury blamed a Chicago engineering company — but not its employee — for a highway crash involving an unstable Bobcat tractor.

  • May 19, 2021

    Workers Tell 2nd Circ. Judge Didn't Have To Punt On Amazon

    Federal judges should be willing and able to assess COVID-19 workplace safety, counsel for Amazon.com workers told the Second Circuit Wednesday, after an appellate judge sympathized with the jurist who kicked their case to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  • May 19, 2021

    Feds Say NCAA Coach's Whistleblower Threat Was Extortion

    A former assistant coach for the University of Louisville men's basketball team was charged with extortion Tuesday after he threatened to blow the whistle on alleged recruiting violations at the school.

  • May 18, 2021

    US Chamber Backs Walmart In 5th Circ. Opioid Challenge

    A slew of organizations, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Chain Drug Stores, have filed amicus briefs backing Walmart's bid to get the Fifth Circuit to revive a suit seeking clarification that the retail giant's current opioid prescription practices are lawful.

  • May 18, 2021

    Gilead Wants Harsher Sanctions For Kickbacks Whistleblower

    Gilead Sciences Inc. has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to rethink his decision that an ex-employee hadn't intentionally destroyed evidence when tens of thousands of text messages sought as part of a whistleblower case were lost on an old cellphone.

  • May 18, 2021

    Ohio Panel OKs Blocking Local Taxes On Teleworkers In 2021

    An Ohio tax-writing committee approved legislation Tuesday that would block cities from imposing their income taxes on remote workers for 2021 but wouldn't retroactively change a law that permitted cities to tax nonresidents during the coronavirus pandemic in 2020.

  • May 18, 2021

    Ill. High Court Mulls Arbitrator's Authority In University Firing

    The Illinois Educational Labor Relations Board and a union representing university professors told the state's top court Tuesday that an arbitrator didn't abuse his discretion when he found Western Illinois University failed to comply with an earlier award in a termination dispute.

  • May 18, 2021

    Uber Can't Force Arbitration In Ga. Suit Over Customer Murder

    The Georgia Court of Appeals has ruled that Uber can't force arbitration of a wrongful death case brought by the mother of an Uber Eats customer murdered by a delivery driver because it is unclear whether the company's terms and conditions were clearly visible on its smartphone application.

  • May 18, 2021

    Pioneer Tells Texas Justices Well Site Explosion Suit Is Settled

    Pioneer Natural Resources USA Inc. told the Texas Supreme Court it settled a dispute over a well site explosion that killed two men, so it no longer seeks to dodge a discovery order demanding its communications with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  • May 18, 2021

    Veteran Trial Lawyer Joins Dallas Trial Boutique 

    Trial boutique Lynn Pinker Hurst & Schwegmann LLP announced Tuesday it has hired a Holland & Knight LLP partner experienced in employment, intellectual property and complex business disputes in Dallas.

  • May 18, 2021

    Judge Fletcher Makes Way For 4th Biden Vacancy On 9th Circ.

    Ninth Circuit Judge William A. Fletcher is taking senior status, giving President Joe Biden a fourth chance to replace a Democratic appointee with a younger jurist on the historically liberal West Coast appeals court.

  • May 18, 2021

    'Angry Cheerleader' Case Could Chill NCAA Athletes' Protests

    A pending U.S. Supreme Court case over whether schools may discipline students for social media posts under the First Amendment may give public universities the ability to further restrict college athletes' online speech, including about social issues or to protest their treatment under NCAA rules, experts say.

  • May 18, 2021

    ComplianceHR CEO Rejoins Littler To Run Miami Office

    Management-side employment law firm Littler Mendelson PC on Monday announced the CEO of ComplianceHR, its joint venture with legal technology company Neota Logic, has returned to the law firm and that ComplianceHR's chief marketing officer has moved up to replace her.

  • May 17, 2021

    Microsoft Hit With Suit Over Uber Drivers' Facial ID Checks

    Microsoft has been hit with state court biometric privacy claims by a proposed class of Illinois drivers who say the company's facial recognition technology unlawfully collected and used their facial data when they verified their identities on Uber's mobile app.

  • May 17, 2021

    HP Says Ex-Worker Lacks Facts To Prove No-Poach Claims

    HP Inc. urged the Ninth Circuit on Monday not to revive a laid-off worker's proposed class action alleging the technology giant cut a "no-poach" deal with a 3D-printing rival, arguing the suit lacks basic facts to get past the starting gate.

  • May 17, 2021

    Surgical Care Blasts DOJ Criminal Case Over Employee Pacts

    UnitedHealth Group unit Surgical Care Affiliates attacked the U.S. Department of Justice's defense of the government's first criminal case targeting employee nonsolicitation agreements, arguing that the prosecution is built on a flawed analogy and violates the company's due process rights.

  • May 14, 2021

    Les Moonves Forgoes $120M Severance In ViacomCBS Deal

    ViacomCBS announced May 14 that the media conglomerate has resolved its dispute with ex-CBS Corp. Chairman and CEO Leslie Moonves, although the former executive will not be receiving his $120 million severance package.

  • May 14, 2021

    5th Circ. Tosses Stanford Ponzi Investors' Claims Against SEI

    Investors in Robert Allen Stanford's massive Ponzi scheme lost their bid to revive claims against investment processor SEI Investments Co. on Friday when the Fifth Circuit said it hadn't seen evidence that SEI had any control over the multibillion-dollar fraud.

  • May 14, 2021

    Uber Trims Fraud Allegation, But Sex Assault Claim Stays

    A California state judge tossed a fraud claim against Uber on Friday but left intact sexual battery, assault and emotional distress claims brought by a woman who says an Uber driver attacked her as a result of the company's "toxic-male culture," finding Uber ignored allegations that it is vicariously liable as a common carrier.

Expert Analysis

  • Ethics Tips For Attorneys Telecommuting Across State Lines

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    Attorneys working remotely from jurisdictions in which they are not admitted should take precautionary steps to avoid engaging in unauthorized practice of law, say John Schmidt and Michael Seaman at Phillips Lytle.

  • For Trucking Accident Plaintiffs, Access To Evidence Is Key

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    The country is relying more than ever on the trucking industry during the COVID-19 pandemic, but when trucking companies fail to properly manage drivers, plaintiffs attorneys can use statutes that enforce access to evidence to obtain justice for accident victims, says Sam Coffey at Coffey Trial Law.

  • Inside DC Bar's New Guidance On Multiple Representation

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    The D.C. Bar recently cleared the way for lawyers to represent both a party and a witness in the same case in guidance that could prove influential as multiple representation in employment cases becomes increasingly common, says Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • 6 Ways Legal Employers Can Help Pandemic-Weary Parents

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    Parenting during the pandemic has introduced a series of competing personal and professional obligations for attorneys and professional staff, and even organizations that are supportive of their parent employees can take steps to do better, says Meredith Kahan at Saul Ewing.

  • How Cos. Can Weather Growing DOJ Labor Antitrust Scrutiny

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    In light of of the U.S. Department of Justice's increasing antitrust scrutiny of labor markets and President Joe Biden's vow to eliminate most noncompetes, companies should customize their compliance plans and review employee agreements to mitigate risk, say Eric Grannon and Adam Acosta at White & Case.

  • Pandemic Force Majeure Interpretations May Be Shifting

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    A New York federal court's ruling in JN Contemporary Art v. Phillips Auctioneers, deeming COVID-19 to be a natural disaster that triggers a force majeure clause, appears to loosen previously strict contours of contractual interpretation and could create a legal quandary for obligees, say Kimberly Daily and Matthew Rawlinson at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Renewable Energy Cos. Need New Risk Management Tools

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    As President Joe Biden seeks to ramp up renewable energy development, the industry's risk managers must not only rely on traditional insurance and contractual warranties, but also explore new risk management products like proxy revenue swaps, say Leslie Thorne and Andrew Van Osselaer at Haynes and Boone.

  • Inside The Immigration Reform Bill's Business Provisions

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    Provisions in the recently introduced U.S. Citizenship Act that aim to reduce the employment-based green card backlog and attract STEM students are welcome business immigration reforms, but the business community is skeptical of its more restrictive provisions, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • A Cautionary Tale On Duplicative Noncompetes

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    Duplicative or overlapping noncompete provisions in employment contracts can hinder enforcement of choice of forum and other restrictive covenants, the Delaware Chancery Court recently showed in AG Resource Holdings LLC v. Terral, and could mean preclusive judgments and duplicative litigation costs for companies, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Remote Working Tips For Lawyer Trainees And Their Firms

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    The prospect of joining a law firm during the pandemic can cause added pressure, but with a few good practices — and a little help from their firms and supervising attorneys — lawyer trainees can get ahead of the curve while working remotely, say William Morris and Ted Landray at King & Spalding.

  • Employer-Friendly Changes May Revive H-1B Visa Program

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    Recent H-1B visa program improvements that are favorable to employers — such as e-registration and more predictability in U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services decision making — may lead companies to reconsider this visa category as a resource for adding foreign-national talent to their workforce, says Matthew Minor at Hammond Neal., says Matthew Minor at Hammond Neal.

  • What Biden's Ethics Pledge Means For Gov't Revolving Door

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    Attorneys at Nossaman look at how President Joe Biden’s ethics pledge goes beyond those of his predecessors by imposing post-employment shadow lobbying and golden parachute restrictions on his administration’s appointees — and how a House bill proposing expansion of federal ethics law could affect enforcement.

  • Punishing Bar Exam Policies On Menstrual Products Must Go

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    Law graduates across the states are sitting for the grueling two-day bar exam this week despite menstruation-related barriers, such as inadequate menstrual product and bathroom access, which could be eradicated with simple policy tweaks, say law professors Elizabeth Cooper, Margaret Johnson and Marcy Karin.

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