More Employment Coverage

  • September 29, 2022

    LinkedIn Spied On Rivals To 'Take Them Out,' Judge Told

    LinkedIn urged a California federal judge Thursday to grant it summary judgment in a recruiting startup's unfair competition lawsuit over access to public information on its website, while the startup countered that LinkedIn spied on it for years before leading it and other competitors "down the path to take them out."

  • September 29, 2022

    Nondisparagement Clause Ban Advanced By NJ Lawmakers

    A New Jersey Assembly panel on Thursday advanced a bill to bar settlement agreements in employment-related cases from including provisions requiring parties not to disparage one another, a measure that would expand a 2019 law that a state appeals court has said barred only nondisclosure clauses.

  • September 29, 2022

    Ahmaud Arbery's Mother Fights DAs' Bid To End Civil Case

    Wanda Cooper, the mother of slain Black man Ahmaud Arbery, has responded in opposition to various motions to dismiss her civil case against the former and current district attorneys and others who handled the criminal investigation into her son's murder.

  • September 29, 2022

    Ex-Bulls Player, Feds Seek No Prison For Health Care Fraud

    Former NBA player Eddie Robinson, the first defendant to plead guilty in a scheme to defraud the NBA's health care plan, appears likely to avoid prison time, according to sentencing recommendations from both sides submitted to a Manhattan federal court judge.

  • September 29, 2022

    Insurance Co. Prevails In $200K Stock Clawback Suit

    A Delaware federal court ruled that an ex-executive of an insurance company owes her former employer $200,000 in stock benefits after she left her job for a competitor, despite her protests that the company decided she needed to fork over the stock in a bad faith process.

  • September 29, 2022

    Adhesive Maker Says Ex-Employee Stole Product Formulas

    Industrial adhesive maker H.B. Fuller Co. is suing a former employee who the company claims took trade secrets with him when he left to work for an Indian competitor.

  • September 29, 2022

    DHS Urged To Give Guidance For Immigrant Labor Disputes

    Democratic lawmakers on Thursday urged the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to issue guidance giving workers, regardless of their immigration status, a way to protect their civil and labor rights and challenge employer labor violations without fear of retaliation.

  • September 29, 2022

    First Guaranty Approved For Ch. 11 Docs With Creditor Deal

    Unsecured creditors of bankrupt mortgage lender and servicer First Guaranty Mortgage Corp. withdrew an objection to the debtor's Chapter 11 disclosure statement Thursday after the company announced a deal with the creditors committee in the case.

  • September 29, 2022

    NJ Atty Ethics Director Ousted Over Relationship With Staffer

    The head of New Jersey's Office of Attorney Ethics has been removed from his post following allegations he had an "intimate relationship" with a staffer and failed to report it, the state judiciary confirmed Thursday.

  • September 29, 2022

    Jackson Lewis Defeats Conn. Doctor's Defamation Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge on Thursday tossed a second attempt at a defamation suit brought by a doctor who lost his hospital job after a sexual assault investigation led by Jackson Lewis PC attorneys, saying the physician's theory that the attorneys defamed him in their report lacks any legal foundation.

  • September 29, 2022

    Senate Confirms Biden's Pick To Lead DOL Benefits Arm

    The Senate confirmed Cohen Weiss & Simon LLP lawyer Lisa Gomez on Thursday to lead the U.S. Department of Labor's employee benefits division, three months after the upper legislative chamber had deadlocked on her nomination.

  • September 29, 2022

    Doctor's Testimony Defeats CSX Worker's Appeal, Court Says

    An Indiana appeals panel will not allow a CSX worker to revive a Federal Employers' Liability Act suit over an alleged workplace injury after a trial court approved the railroad company's bid for summary judgment, citing the treating physician's testimony that the injury was unlikely to have been caused by the type of incident described.

  • September 29, 2022

    Bass Berry Names New Employee Benefits Chair

    Tennessee firm Bass Berry & Sims PLC has announced that it's named an experienced benefits attorney with over 15 years of experience, including a stint with the Internal Revenue Service, as the new practice chair of its employee benefits group.

  • September 29, 2022

    McDermott Adds Morgan Lewis Employee Benefits Pro In LA

    McDermott Will & Emery LLP announced Thursday it is adding a Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP employee benefits expert as a partner in its Los Angeles office.

  • September 29, 2022

    Littler Shareholder Named Deputy GC Of Nat'l Bar Association

    A Littler Mendelson PC shareholder who has been with the labor and employment law firm for almost a decade has been appointed deputy general counsel at the National Bar Association.

  • September 28, 2022

    Cash, Vacation Bribes Land Ex-Cargill Worker Prison Time

    A former senior Cargill Inc. employee must spend more than four years in prison and pay nearly $34 million in restitution after pleading guilty in a scheme to defraud the global food company by accepting thousands of dollars in cash and lavish vacations from a vendor, North Carolina federal prosecutors said.

  • September 28, 2022

    Postal Service Questions Fired Worker's Ability To Return

    A former postal carrier was so upset that he could barely tell a Pennsylvania federal judge Wednesday about his 2016 firing after he fell and injured his knee, but an attorney for the United States Postal Service pressed him on whether his injury had left him unable to return even if he wanted to.

  • September 28, 2022

    10th Circ. Affirms Black Lung Benefits For Energy West Miner

    A pack-a-day smoker who worked for Energy West Mining Co. needs to show only that his work in the mines partially contributed to his lung disease in order to qualify for black lung benefits, the Tenth Circuit has found, siding with several other appellate courts.

  • September 28, 2022

    HP Can't Shift Blame In $23M Generator Explosion Injury Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge has refused HP Inc.'s bid to pin liability for a hydrogen generator explosion that severely injured a worker onto a German inspection company, ruling Tuesday that the two firms never entered into any kind of agreement.

  • September 28, 2022

    Ex-Fox VP Owed Severance After Disney Merger, Judge Rules

    A former Twenty-First Century Fox executive who claimed she was terminated without cause after Fox and The Walt Disney Co. merged in 2018 is owed severance benefits, a California federal judge ruled, though she tossed the executive's other claims against the entertainment behemoths.

  • September 28, 2022

    Driver's Family Can't Sue Cintas Supervisor Over Heat Death

    A Missouri appeals court won't let the family of a Cintas driver sue his supervisor over the driver's death from a heat-induced heart attack, saying the record doesn't show that the supervisor breached a duty beyond the employer's general duty to provide a safe work environment, which is already covered by workers' compensation law.

  • September 28, 2022

    NJ High Court Seems Open To Arbitration For College Police

    The New Jersey Supreme Court pushed back Wednesday on claims by the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University that public universities' police officers are ineligible for special arbitration via the state's Public Employment Relations Commission, questioning their positions that such institutions are not law enforcement agencies.

  • September 28, 2022

    Littler Lands Trade Secrets, E-Discovery Talent In 2 Offices

    Labor and employment firm Littler Mendelson PC continues its expansion by adding two attorneys as shareholders — a Singer Cashman LLP trade secrets expert in San Francisco and an Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC e-discovery pro in Kansas City, Missouri.

  • September 28, 2022

    Feds Expand K&L Gates Stalking Case As Atty's Trial Nears

    Federal prosecutors are asking for further evidence to be admitted in a criminal case accusing a former K&L Gates partner of cyberstalking colleagues, saying the attorney also physically stalked and intimidated victims after he was banned from the firm's New York office.

  • September 28, 2022

    Employment Atty Returns To Latham In Bay Area

    A veteran litigator specializing in labor and employment matters has returned to Latham & Watkins LLP's San Francisco office nearly 25 years after leaving.

Expert Analysis

  • Insight Into California's Increasing Cannabis Litigation

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    California's cannabis industry is experiencing a swirl of challenges leading to a rise in cannabis-related litigation ranging from breach of contract claims to employment disputes — but companies can take several steps to avoid these growing pains, say Alexa Steinberg and Steven Stein at Greenberg Glusker.

  • 2 FCA Settlements Highlight Gov't Cyber Liability Focus

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    Recent False Claims Act settlements with Comprehensive Health Care Services and Aerojet Rocketyne illustrate government contractors' growing cybersecurity liability, and underscore how important it is for companies to comply with new incident reporting regulations and live up to standing contractual obligations, say attorneys at O'Melveny.

  • After High Court Ruling, Arbitration May Lose Its Luster

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Morgan v. Sundance, holding that prejudice is not required to waive a party’s right to arbitration, could make arbitration less desirable for defendants, compelling employers to opt for the predictability, safety and cost-effectiveness of the courts, say attorneys Richard Faulkner and Philip Loree.

  • Tips For Employers Preparing For Del. Family Leave Law

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    The recently passed Healthy Delaware Families Act guarantees paid parental, medical and military leave for private sector workers, so employers should take steps to prepare before the law takes effect in 2026, like identifying covered employees and training management, say Michael Truncellito and Monica Simmons at Buchanan Ingersoll.

  • How To Protect Health Care Trade Secrets With Covenants

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    Post-employment restrictive covenants such as noncompetes are an effective way for health companies to protect confidential information and trade secrets, but employers must be cognizant of the rapidly changing state laws governing the enforceability of such agreements, say Erik Weibust and Katherine Rigby at Epstein Becker.

  • Lateral Candidate Screening Steps To Prevent Bad Behavior

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    Bullying and harassment are among the root causes of stress, anxiety and substance abuse in the legal profession, so law firms should take four actions to effectively screen lateral candidates and ensure they are not recruiting individuals who could jeopardize the well-being of their people, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • Preventing Workplace Violence Is Not Just For The Oscars

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    Will Smith slapping Chris Rock at the Oscars holds important legal lessons for companies seeking to maintain a safe workplace and mitigate liability risk as occupational violence continues to rise, say Sarah Sawyer and Russell Berger at Offit Kurman.

  • A Look At The Legal Profession Since Murder Of George Floyd

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    Little has changed for Black attorneys since law firms promised to combat discrimination within the profession following George Floyd's murder, but on this second anniversary of his death, law firms can recommit by adopting specific strategies that set their Black lawyers up for success, say Lisa Davis and Khasim Lockhart at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Guides On Noncompete Agreement Timing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent decision in Rouses Enterprises v. Clapp, holding that an employment relationship must be official before an employee is required to sign a noncompete agreement, highlights employer best practices for drafting and executing restrictive covenants that are enforceable under varying state laws, says Andrew Albritton at McGlinchey Stafford.

  • NY Ruling Correctly Deems Legal Finance Docs Irrelevant

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    A New York appeals court's recent decision in Worldview Entertainment v. Woodrow joins a growing trend of decisions denying discovery of litigation funding documents, highlighting that commercial legal finance should be treated just like any other financing in commercial litigation, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Addressing Low Response Rates In Expert Surveys

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    While expert witnesses are receiving dwindling responses to the surveys they conduct to gauge public beliefs and attitudes, recent cases show that a low response rate need not make a survey inadmissible in court, say Kristen Backor and Yamimi Jena at Charles River Associates, and Brandon Duke at Winston & Strawn.

  • 10 Tips For An Effective BYOD And Remote Access Policy

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    Jason Pill at Phelps Dunbar lays out considerations for employee bring-your-own-device and remote access policies, particularly as remote work becomes more common and in light of new standards set by the recently passed Cyber Incident Reporting for Critical Infrastructure Act.

  • Worker Migration Calls For Fla., NY Employment Law Review

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    Newly remote employees who left New York for Florida during the pandemic should consider the applicable state noncompete laws, because restrictive covenants in employment agreements can seriously affect an employee's post-termination options, say Yaniv Adar and Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

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