More Employment Coverage

  • June 22, 2022

    SuperValu Urges High Court Not To Revive FCA Case

    Supermarket chain SuperValu wants the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a challenge to its controversial win at the Seventh Circuit in a False Claims Act liability case, saying there wasn't any circuit split on the issue in the fight.

  • June 22, 2022

    Zurich Wants Out Of Workers' Asbestos Liability Suit

    A suit brought by a group of workers suffering from the effects of asbestos exposure should be dismissed, Zurich American Insurance Co. told a Montana federal court, saying the workers' allegations failed to make it "reasonably clear" that coverage is warranted.

  • June 22, 2022

    Seattle's 'Amazon Tax' Upheld By Wash. State Appeals Court

    Seattle's so-called Amazon tax, levied on the payroll expenses of large businesses within the city, is not unconstitutional, a Washington appeals court said, rejecting arguments that the tax targets the fundamental right to work for wages.

  • June 22, 2022

    PetSmart Urges Dismissal Of Worker's Voice-Tracking Claims

    PetSmart told an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to throw out a former employee's lawsuit targeting its use of voice-tracking software, arguing he hasn't shown the technology collects voiceprints that are protected by the Biometric Information Privacy Act.

  • June 22, 2022

    Fired Wilson Elser Litigator Accuses Firm Of Disability Bias

    A New York litigator has accused Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP of firing him because he is disabled after allegedly denying or ignoring multiple requests to make "reasonable accommodations" for his condition.

  • June 22, 2022

    NC Judge Axes PE Firm's Holding Cos. From Contract Dispute

    A former private equity firm employee looking to recoup money he's allegedly owed from his one-time employer can't pin those losses on two of the firm's holding companies, a North Carolina state court judge said in an order dismissing them from the breach of contract case.

  • June 22, 2022

    Tribunal Must Review University's Redundancy 'Fairness'

    An employment tribunal must consider whether a private university ran a fair redundancy process, even though the employee herself did not raise the issue in the proceedings, an appellate panel has ruled.

  • June 21, 2022

    Uber, Lyft Drivers Want Court To Block Alleged Price-Fixing

    Uber and Lyft drivers hit the ride-hailing giants with a first-of-its-kind proposed class action Tuesday claiming that the companies have been price-fixing ride fares, an alleged practice that means drivers made less than they would have otherwise for their work, according to the suit.

  • June 21, 2022

    Altice Gets Initial OK For Employee Data Breach Settlement

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday gave preliminary approval to a deal Altice USA inked to settle class claims that the cable giant failed to protect more than 52,000 current and former employees' personal information and prevent a 2019 phishing attack that left them vulnerable to hackers.

  • June 21, 2022

    Colorado High Court Says Family Leave Premium Not A Tax

    The Colorado Supreme Court threw out a challenge Tuesday to the state's paid family and medical leave program contending workers' payments slated to fund the program amounted to unconstitutional taxation, ruling the program was legal under state law.

  • June 21, 2022

    NC Judge Pauses OSHA Citation Suit Pending Appeal

    A federal magistrate judge on Tuesday agreed to temporarily sideline litigation accusing North Carolina officials of incentivizing state inspectors to issue workplace safety violations while those officials pursue their Fourth Circuit bid to toss the suit.

  • June 21, 2022

    Parker Hit With Class Claims Over Employee Data Breach

    Defense contractor Parker Hannifin Corp. has been hit with a new proposed class action stemming from a March ransomware attack in which hackers stole the personal and sensitive information of current and former employees.

  • June 21, 2022

    High Court Won't Hear Medical Cannabis Insurance Challenge

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear an appeal from a medical cannabis patient challenging whether federal drug policy should preempt state laws requiring compensation for certain medical cannabis costs.

  • June 21, 2022

    DaVita Gets All Clear To Return No-Poach Docs

    An Illinois federal judge gave DaVita the permission it needed Monday to dispose of confidential documents produced by the U.S. Department of Justice in its failed criminal no-poach case, deeming it sufficient for follow-on civil plaintiffs that the company will return what DOJ gave it.

  • June 21, 2022

    IRS Won't Rule On Some Employer Reversion Requests

    The Internal Revenue Service released guidance Tuesday saying it wouldn't issue letter rulings on whether some transactions lead to an employer reversion.

  • June 21, 2022

    High Court Says Wash. Nuclear Workers Law Discriminatory

    Washington state discriminated against the United States government when it passed a law allowing federal contractors at the Hanford nuclear cleanup site to easily sue the U.S. for damages, the Supreme Court said in a unanimous decision Tuesday, rejecting the state's argument that the case became moot after it replaced the law with a new one. 

  • June 21, 2022

    High Court To Review DOJ Authority To Torpedo FCA Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to hear a case examining if the federal government lost its authority to dismiss a whistleblower's False Claims Act suit by waiting too long to jump into it.

  • June 20, 2022

    Ex-Tesla Workers Say Thousands Fired Without Proper Notice

    Tesla Inc. laid off "thousands" of workers, including more than 500 at one Nevada plant, without issuing the federally required notice, two former workers said in a putative class action filed in Texas federal court Monday.

  • June 17, 2022

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    As the legal market adjusted to pressures of a global pandemic and saw demand for complex legal services soar, many law firms spent 2021 locked in a fierce war for talent to meet ever-expanding client needs.

  • June 17, 2022

    Will BigLaw Regret Its Hiring Spree As The Economy Softens?

    The largest 200 law firms in the U.S. boosted their headcount by an average of 5.6% in 2021 — the steepest increase in five years, according to the Law360 400. Here's a look at what those numbers mean and where firms may be headed if the economy slows in the coming year.

  • June 17, 2022

    Texas Justices Block Request For UPS Driver Drug Tests

    The Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday that a lower court erroneously allowed a mother to retrieve confidential drug test records for hundreds of UPS drivers in her negligence suit after her son was killed in a collision with a UPS driver who was under the influence of marijuana.

  • June 17, 2022

    5th Circ. Denies Atty's Request For More Fees In Settled Suit

    A three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit ruled Wednesday that one of the attorneys who worked on the suit against energy reseller Stream Energy over an alleged pyramid scheme cannot walk away with more money than a lower court already awarded him for his involvement in the case.

  • June 17, 2022

    Ex-Bulls Player Cops To Conspiracy In NBA Fraud Crackdown

    A former Chicago Bulls forward on Friday became the first NBA veteran in the Manhattan U.S. attorney's health plan fraud crackdown to plead out, telling a federal judge he conspired to falsely bill the league for chiropractic services.

  • June 17, 2022

    Ga. Attys Say Insurer Can't Stay Lin Wood Libel Suit

    Three attorneys suing prominent conservative lawyer L. Lin Wood Jr. for defamation after leaving his firm asked a Georgia federal court to reject a motion by his insurer to stay the case while it pursues a court order that it's not liable to cover the litigation.

  • June 17, 2022

    Coal Co. Faces $1.2M Fine For Not Vacating Mine During Fire

    The Mine Safety and Health Administration announced Friday it is seeking to fine the operator of an Illinois coal mine $1.2 million for not immediately stopping operations and evacuating miners when a fire broke out underground.

Expert Analysis

  • Steps Companies Can Take To Mitigate Privilege Labeling Risk

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    Although Google prevailed on a recent privilege labeling sanctions motion, an important takeaway from the decision is that companies should assess their in-house procedures and employee training programs regarding privileged communications to mitigate risks of the potential appearance of bad faith privilege claims, say Gareth Evans at Redgrave and e-discovery attorney James Hertsch.

  • What Litigation Funding Disclosure In Delaware May Look Like

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    A standing order issued by Delaware's chief federal judge requiring litigants to disclose whether their cases or defenses are being financed by third parties is unlikely to have onerous effects but may raise questions regarding potential conflicts of interest and access to justice, say Cayse Llorens and Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

  • How To Avert Unlawful Poaching Amid Rising Antitrust Risks

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    Despite the uptick in labor market antitrust enforcement actions, no-poach agreements can be helpful in preventing unfair competition resulting from misuse of confidential or competitively sensitive information — when tailored appropriately and used with best practices to reduce risk, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Inside Oregon's New Paid Family And Medical Leave Program

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    Rachel Timmins and Flo Mao at Ogletree discuss the ins and outs of Oregon's new paid family and medical leave insurance program set to take effect early next year, and explain why and how employers should model their policies after existing laws such as the Family and Medical Leave Act.

  • A Guide To CalSavers Compliance As Deadline Approaches

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    As California's new CalSavers retirement program continues to be phased in — with the latest deadline approaching at the end of the month — prudent employers will want to use best practices as they enroll to avoid any sort of violation, say Jordon Ferguson and Wesley Gonzales at Locke Lord.

  • The Future Of Virtual I-9 Document Verification

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    Proposed revisions to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' employment authorization Form I-9 failed to address remote document inspection, but questions in a request for employer feedback provide hope that temporary accommodation for employers during the pandemic may become permanent, says Valentine Brown at Duane Morris.

  • How In-House Legal Leaders Can Drive Corporate Growth

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    Today, more executives are seeking legal leaders who are strategic, adaptable thinkers, making it essential that in-house counsel get out of their comfort zone of legal advice and take several steps to contribute toward revenue growth and raise their profile, says Tim Parilla at LinkSquares.

  • Work Permit Extension Rule Increases I-9 Compliance Risks

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' expansion of automatic employment authorization extensions should help alleviate labor shortages caused by processing backlogs, but may also put employers at increased risk of inadvertent employment eligibility verification noncompliance and discrimination violations, says Brandon Davis at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Attorneys Should Tread Carefully On Job Counteroffers

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    Promises of more compensation to keep attorneys from leaving their jobs have become commonplace in today's hot job market, but lawyers should weigh their options carefully as accepting a counteroffer can negatively affect their reputation, says Leeron Molloy at VOYlegal.

  • Justices' Jurisdiction Ruling Could Increase Business Liability

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's forthcoming decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern could create a seismic shift in business litigation across the country by subjecting companies to personal jurisdiction in any state where they are merely registered to do business, say Amandra Cottrell and Jonathan Clark at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The Future Of Legal Ops: Time To Get Serious About Data

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    Most corporate legal departments collect surface-level data around their operations, such as costs and time to resolution, but legal leaders should explore more in-depth data gathering to assess how effective an attorney was, how efficiently legal work was performed, and more, says Andy Krebs at Intel.

  • Employer Considerations For Leave Donation Programs

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    As the battle for talent continues and workers return to the office, companies may consider allowing employees to donate accrued leave time to a shared bank, but employers should first review these programs' complex design issues to comply with state laws and avoid tax consequences, says Rebecca Hudson at Holland & Hart.

  • Insight Into California's Increasing Cannabis Litigation

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    California's cannabis industry is experiencing a swirl of challenges leading to a rise in cannabis-related litigation ranging from breach of contract claims to employment disputes — but companies can take several steps to avoid these growing pains, say Alexa Steinberg and Steven Stein at Greenberg Glusker.

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