More Employment Coverage

  • June 08, 2021

    Texas Justices Hit Pause On Virtual Jury Trial In $100M Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Tuesday halted a virtual jury trial that was slated to begin Wednesday in a $100 million personal injury suit while it mulls whether a fuel company can demand an in-person jury trial.

  • June 08, 2021

    Ex-Banker Slams 'Disgraceful' Credit Suisse At £60M Trial

    A former banker accused Credit Suisse of a "disgraceful" lack of scruples on the first day of trial in his £60.3 million ($85.2 million) lawsuit, which claims that his former employer failed to protect him when he was convicted on espionage charges in Romania.

  • June 07, 2021

    Ex-Pharma Co. Workers Must Arbitrate Whistleblower Claims

    The New Jersey state appeals court affirmed Monday that two former employees of a Gilead Sciences Inc. unit must resolve their whistleblower claims out of court, reasoning that the language in the company's arbitration agreement wasn't ambiguous.

  • June 07, 2021

    Topgolf Agrees To Pay Workers $2.6M In BIPA Suit

    Ex-Topgolf workers alleging that their former employer improperly collected and stored employees' fingerprint data in violation of Illinois' landmark biometric privacy law asked an Illinois federal judge Friday to approve a $2.6 million settlement resolving the litigation.

  • June 07, 2021

    Fired XFL Commissioner Wants To Depose K&L Gates Atty

    Ousted XFL Commissioner Oliver Luck is urging a Connecticut federal judge to let him depose a K&L Gates LLP partner whose investigation purportedly led to his firing, arguing the league only sought the attorney's advice after it had decided to can Luck.

  • June 07, 2021

    NJ Says Ex-Judge Can't Pursue Pay Suit After Criminal Case

    The New Jersey state judiciary has called on a federal court to toss a former state judge's suit seeking back pay for the nearly five years she was suspended while facing later-dismissed criminal charges, saying the case is barred on immunity grounds and the court otherwise lacks jurisdiction over her state constitutional claim.

  • June 05, 2021

    Seattle Payroll Tax Constitutional, Wash. Court Rules

    Seattle's tax targeting businesses with highly paid employees is an excise tax and not an unconstitutional income tax as argued by the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, a Washington state court ruled.

  • June 04, 2021

    Legal Sector Gains More Jobs, Nears Pre-Pandemic Levels

    The U.S. legal sector is inching its way back toward pre-pandemic employment levels, according to a report out Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which showed the sector added 1,700 jobs between April and May.

  • June 04, 2021

    Fox Rothschild Snags 3 McDermott Benefits Partners

    Three former McDermott Will & Emery LLP attorneys have joined Fox Rothschild LLP, where they will bring their experience — cultivated independently and as a team — to the firm's New York office as employment and benefits partners, the firm said Friday.

  • June 04, 2021

    Judge Won't Ax Class Claims For Fingerprint Co. In BIPA Row

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday refused to strike class allegations related to a fingerprint database manager from a suit brought by a trampoline park worker who alleges her and other workers' fingerprints were collected without the proper consent or disclosures required under the state's landmark biometric privacy law.

  • June 04, 2021

    10th Circ. Revives Suit Over Stabbing Outside Walmart

    The Tenth Circuit has sent back to court a suit by a Walmart customer alleging the retailer was negligent when he was stabbed while attempting to break up an argument between an employee and her husband, saying the court should have looked at whether an assault was foreseeable, not whether the store could have foreseen a stabbing specifically.

  • June 03, 2021

    High Court Curbs Reach Of Tool Used To Go After Insiders

    The U.S. Supreme Court's narrowing of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act on Thursday limits the reach of a law that companies have used to punish rogue insiders, and could prompt Congress to update a computer crime statute passed before the birth of the modern internet.

  • June 03, 2021

    NJ Judge Won't Toss Hertz's Revised $56M Clawback Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge largely allowed Hertz Corp. to move forward Thursday with a lawsuit aimed at clawing back $56 million from its ex-CEO and former general counsel over their alleged breaches of company business standards in the runup to an accounting scandal.

  • June 03, 2021

    SEC's Roisman Offers Ways To Cut ESG Disclosure Costs

    Despite his "reservations" about the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission developing a more prescriptive environmental, social and governance disclosure framework, Commissioner Elad Roisman on Thursday put his two cents in on how to minimize costs and burdens for firms if the anticipated new rules become a reality.

  • June 03, 2021

    House Dems Urge Review Of COVID Telework Cybersecurity

    Leaders of the U.S. House oversight committee have urged government watchdogs across 10 federal agencies to investigate whether their departments are at a heightened risk for cybersecurity attacks following the pandemic-related shift to teleworking.

  • June 03, 2021

    Supreme Court Narrows Scope Of Computer Crime Law

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday found that a Georgia police officer did not breach federal computer fraud law by overstepping his authorized access to government records, raising concerns that the U.S. Department of Justice's reading of the statute could criminalize innocuous internet activity.

  • June 02, 2021

    Texas AG Tells Panel To Toss Ex-Aides' Whistleblower Suit

    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has told a Texas appellate court that it should toss a whistleblower lawsuit brought against him by four former top aides alleging they were fired after reporting alleged abuses of power for many reasons, including that he is immune from the claims.

  • June 02, 2021

    BofA Must Reopen Calif. Benefit Recipients' Fraud Claims

    A California federal judge has ordered Bank of America to reopen and investigate suspicious activity claims filed by California unemployment benefits recipients who have been summarily frozen out of their accounts amid a surge of pandemic-related fraud.

  • June 02, 2021

    7th Circ. Asked To Refer BIPA Timing Question To Ill. Justices

    A former White Castle manager who claims the fast-food company violated the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act asked that the Seventh Circuit kick to the state Supreme Court the question of when BIPA claims accrue, arguing the issue is better suited for resolution by the state's justices.

  • June 02, 2021

    Piping Repair Co. Hit With $222M Verdict Over Scalding Death

    A Texas jury has hit piping repair and maintenance company Team Industrial Services Inc. with a $222 million verdict in a suit alleging it failed to repair a faulty relief valve, leading to a worker being scalded with superheated steam, resulting in his death.

  • June 02, 2021

    DNA Co. Says Calif. Standards Wrongly Used To Trim Suit

    A DNA-sequencing business is defending its challenge of a lower court order that tossed most of the claims in a trade secret lawsuit it launched, telling the Ninth Circuit that the decision wrongly relied on California civil procedure to dismiss federal claims.

  • June 02, 2021

    Full 1st Circ. To Decide If NH Speaker Can Bar Virtual Votes

    The full First Circuit will reexamine a panel ruling that said the speaker of the New Hampshire House could be sued for refusing to allow virtual votes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • June 01, 2021

    DOL Says Pa. Paper Co. Illegally Fired Worker For OSHA Probe

    The U.S. Department of Labor hit a paper box manufacturer and its owner with a lawsuit in Pennsylvania federal court Tuesday, alleging management illegally fired an employee who repeatedly asked her supervisor for safety gloves, because they believed she had reported the business to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 

  • June 01, 2021

    Senate OKs More Funding For CFTC Whistleblower Program

    The U.S. Senate on Friday gave the green light to the creation of a temporary second account to house funds for the Commodities Futures Trading Commission's whistleblower program, a move that would allow it to continue operating at a financially precarious time for the office.

  • June 01, 2021

    DynCorp Wants $35M FCA Overcharging Case Tossed

    DynCorp International has urged a Texas federal court to end a case accusing the company of fraudulently overcharging the Army under a massive logistics contract, saying the government had signed off on the subcontractor agreement that led to the alleged overbilling.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Steps Oil And Gas Cos. Can Take To Manage Cyber Risk

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    In light of the recent ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline, oil and gas companies should consider potential legal exposure from cybersecurity breaches, implement plans and procedures for dealing with such incidents, and review vulnerabilities related to external parties, says Valerie Hatami at Conner & Winters.

  • Ill. Noncompete Reform Balances Employee And Biz Interests

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    The noncompete bill recently passed by the Illinois Legislature protects due process for workers while preserving employers' ability to guard business assets — a rare political compromise that may reduce noncompete litigation but increase the chances of enforceability in court, say Peter Steinmeyer and Brian Spang at Epstein Becker.

  • Lawyer Perfectionism Is A Disease We Can Control

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    The pursuit of perfection that is prevalent among lawyers can lead to depression, anxiety and other mental health impacts, but new attorneys and industry leaders alike can take four steps to treat this malady, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your 2021 Summer Associates Succeed

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    Despite pandemic-related challenges this year, law firms can effectively train summer associates on writing and communicating — without investing more time than they ordinarily would, says Julie Schrager at Schiff Hardin.

  • Weighing Ability To Pay Criminal Fines Amid FCPA Crackdown

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    As Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement is expected to increase under the Biden administration, companies facing scrutiny should assess the reasonableness of fines in the context of their capacity to continue operations, and the potential impacts of filing an inability-to-pay claim, say analysts at Charles River Associates.

  • Pa. Tax Talk: Takeaways From 2 Commonwealth Court Rulings

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    A Pennsylvania appellate court's recent decision in Good Shepherd Rehabilitation v. Allentown sets a positive precedent for other nonprofits subject to Allentown's aggressive tax position, and its recent decision in Mandler v. Commonwealth offers a reminder that some taxes, including payroll withholding taxes, are never dischargeable in bankruptcy, says Jennifer Karpchuk at Chamberlain Hrdlicka.

  • Firms Should Use Surveys To Make Smart Legal Tech Choices

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    The utility of legal technology innovations may be limited without clear data and objectives from the outset, but targeted surveys can provide specific insights that enable law firms to adopt the most appropriate and efficient tech solutions, says Tim Scott at Frogslayer.

  • Mass. Ruling Highlights Exec Employment Pact Pitfalls

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    A Massachusetts court’s recent decision that a job offer letter was not enforceable as a contract in Moore v. LGH Medical reminds employers and executives to avoid reliance on ambiguous representations in written or oral negotiations, say Brian MacDonough and Nancy Shilepsky at Sherin and Lodgen.

  • Don't Forget Due Diligence In Race For Lateral Associate Hires

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    Amid high demand for associates and aggressive competition to attract talent, law firms should take three key steps to conduct meaningful prehire due diligence and safeguard against lateral hiring mistakes that can hurt their revenue and reputation, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • China Trade Secret Ruling Shows US Cos. Path To Protection

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    The high court of China recently upheld a record $25 million award against Wanglong Group for theft of vanillin trade secrets, joining several pro-plaintiff legal developments that illustrate why U.S. companies should utilize the jurisdiction when suing Chinese defendants, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn and YuandaWinston.

  • 2 Paths To Green Cards For Employment-Based Immigrants

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    In light of immigration policy changes by the Biden administration and pandemic-related consular processing delays, Cynthia Perez and Douglas Halpert at Hammond Neal lay out the pros and cons of two procedural paths to lawful permanent resident status for employment-based immigrants.

  • Addressing Environmental Justice As Part Of ESG Initiatives

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    Recent calls for racial equity and government regulators' increasing focus on social and environmental concerns make this a good time for companies to integrate environmental justice into their environmental, social and governance efforts, say Stacey Halliday and Julius Redd at Beveridge & Diamond, and Jesse Glickstein at Hewlett Packard.

  • Lessons In Civility From The Alex Oh Sanctions Controversy

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    Alex Oh’s abrupt departure from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and admonishment by a D.C. federal judge over conduct in an Exxon human rights case demonstrate three major costs of incivility to lawyers, and highlight the importance of teaching civility in law school, says David Grenardo at St. Mary's University.

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