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New York

  • November 16, 2018

    NY Says Funding Ban For Sanctuary Locales Unconstitutional

    The state of New York, along with several other jurisdictions, pressed a Manhattan federal judge Friday to issue a nationwide injunction blocking the Trump administration from cutting off law enforcement funding for so-called sanctuary jurisdictions, arguing new conditions for the funds are unlawful and unconstitutional.

  • November 16, 2018

    SEC Accuses Digital Media Co. Of Inflating App Downloads

    A New York-based digital media company and its former managers consented to fines and other sanctions in settling a civil U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission complaint filed Thursday accusing them of inflating the firm's value by paying a marketer to generate more than 500,0000 downloads of the company's mobile app and other deceptive acts.

  • November 16, 2018

    Fintech Co. Misled IPO Investors, Stock-Drop Suit Says

    Financial technology startup GreenSky Inc. deceived investors by filing a misleading registration statement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in its initial public offering, shareholders argued in a proposed class action filed in New York state court that said stock prices tumbled after revised guidance was released months later.

  • November 16, 2018

    Madoff Trustee Asks 2nd Circ. To Back Foreign Clawback Bids

    The trustee for Bernie Madoff’s fraudulent investment firm asked the Second Circuit on Friday to allow him to claw back Ponzi scheme proceeds transferred from foreign Madoff feeder funds, saying the efforts are a domestic application of U.S. law even if the money was sent overseas.

  • November 16, 2018

    Sears Seeks OK To Spend Up To $25M To Retain Key Workers

    Sears is asking a New York bankruptcy court for permission to pay up to $25 million in executive incentive and retention bonuses, saying it needs to keep key employees focused on steering the company through its Chapter 11.

  • November 16, 2018

    More Info Needed In $134M Westinghouse Ch. 11 Row

    A New York bankruptcy judge said Friday that Brookfield Business Partners LP and the legal professionals winding down Westinghouse Electric Co.'s Chapter 11 estate need to provide more information before he can rule on a disputed $134 million transferred to Brookfield when it bought the distressed contractor.

  • November 16, 2018

    NY Atty Pleads Not Guilty To Fatally Shooting Daughter's Mom

    A New York City attorney pled not guilty Friday in New Jersey state court to charges of fatally shooting the mother of his daughter in their New Jersey home last month before allegedly fleeing to Cuba, while his lawyer called on prosecutors to turn over additional discovery about the case.

  • November 16, 2018

    Medtronic Unit Agrees To $54.5M Deal In Investor Fraud Suit

    Medtronic PLC unit HeartWare International told a Manhattan federal court on Friday that it will pay $54.5 million to investors to settle allegations that it misled them about the prospects of its MVAD heart pump and overstated its efforts to fix problems with the device.

  • November 16, 2018

    Columbia U. Workers Regain Class Cert. In ERISA Row

    A New York federal judge certified a class of current and former Columbia University workers in their Employee Retirement Income Security Act lawsuit against the university on Thursday, moving the case forward from a dispute about whether a magistrate judge properly weighed in on class certification last week.

  • November 16, 2018

    Mnuchin Cleared To Seek Funds From Relativity D&O Policy

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin should not be hindered by Relativity Media’s Chapter 11 case from seeking $207,000 in reimbursement from a directors and officers insurance policy maintained by the studio, a New York bankruptcy judge ruled Friday, saying the former company co-chairman appears covered by the policy.

  • November 16, 2018

    Real Estate Rumors: SJP, Baptist Hospital Of Miami, Beacon

    SJP Properties has reportedly leased 19,000 square feet in New York to Berry Appleman & Leiden, Baptist Hospital of Miami is said to have dropped $11.34 million on multiple office buildings, and Beacon Capital is reportedly buying a Los Angeles-area office tower from Piedmont Office Realty Trust for $160 million.

  • November 16, 2018

    12 AGs Call For End Of Policy Slowing Family Reunification

    Attorneys general from 12 states have urged the Trump administration to promptly reverse a policy that has allegedly impeded the release of unaccompanied immigrant children from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services custody to their family members or designated sponsors in the U.S.

  • November 16, 2018

    Lloyd's Sues Over Coverage Advice In $64M Malpractice Row

    Lloyd's of London underwriters sued a New York lawyer Thursday for allegedly advising them to deny coverage for a malpractice case against a former Dickstein Shapiro LLP lawyer that resulted in a $64 million judgment and later litigation that cost them more than their coverage limits.

  • November 16, 2018

    Health Hires: Quinn Emanuel, Goodwin, Ropes & Gray

    The newest round of hires in the health and life sciences industries have found homes at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP, Goodwin Procter LLP, Ropes & Gray LLP, Nelson Hardiman LLP, Nichols Liu LLP, K&L Gates LLP, Manatt Phelps & Phillips, Sumner Schick LLP and a handful of companies in need of GCs. 

  • November 16, 2018

    BofA, Deutsche Bank Say Sibor-Rigging Suit Falls Short

    Bank of America, Deutsche Bank and other financial institutions asked a New York federal court Friday to toss a suit accusing them of conspiring to manipulate the Singapore Interbank Offered Rate, saying the plaintiffs failed to plausibly allege a conspiracy and that their antitrust claims are barred by the statute of limitations.

  • November 16, 2018

    Robbery Smear Won't Help Class Rep Hopeful, Judge Says

    A Manhattan federal judge scolded a would-be class representative in an investor suit against Helios and Matheson Analytics for suggesting a rival vying for the role may have committed armed robbery.

  • November 16, 2018

    Photo Co. Sued For Firing Gender-Nonconforming Worker

    Picsolve International Ltd. has been hit with a New York state court lawsuit by a former employee who claims to have faced discrimination and harassment based on gender identity while working at the photo company.

  • November 16, 2018

    Supreme Court Will Hear Case Over Ross' Census Deposition

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday granted the federal government’s petition to review a New York federal court ruling greenlighting the deposition of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross regarding the Trump administration's decision to include a question about citizenship status on the 2020 census.

  • November 15, 2018

    Citibank, JPMorgan Chase Ink $21M SIBOR Rigging Suit Deal

    CitiGroup Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. have agreed to pay nearly $21 million to escape a putative class action over an alleged conspiracy to manipulate the Singapore Interbank Offered Rate, the plaintiffs said in a motion to preliminarily approve the deal in New York federal court Thursday.

  • November 15, 2018

    $150M Ch. 7 Deal To Free Ampal From Egypt Gas Row OK'd

    Ampal-American Israel Corp. received permission Thursday from a New York bankruptcy judge to enter into a deal that will allow the company to exit arbitration hearings involving Egypt and two state-owned oil and gas companies and give a boost of about $150 million to the company’s Chapter 7 estate.

Expert Analysis

  • A Year-End Refresher On Laws Banning Pay History Inquiries

    Amy Traub

    A recent wave of state and local legislation aims to correct the disparate impact of a seemingly innocuous interviewing practice — asking a candidate about his or her salary history, say Amy Traub and Amanda Van Hoose Garofalo of BakerHostetler.

  • Rise Of The CMOs

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    Joshua Peck, incoming marketing director of Hill Wallack LLP, traces the evolution of the chief marketing officer position at law firms and shares insights from three legal marketing pioneers.

  • State Net

    Voters, Courts Slowly Take Lawmakers' Redistricting Power

    Rich Ehisen

    Thanks to the passage of ballot measures in this month's elections, Missouri, Colorado and Michigan have joined 13 other states that use independent commissions or other bipartisan or nonpartisan means to create legislative or congressional districts, or both, to combat gerrymandering, says Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Spoofing Charges Don't Readily Translate To Private Actions

    Laura Brookover

    Private plaintiffs have filed putative class actions in Chicago and New York on the heels of government enforcement efforts against spoofing. But actions like these are largely untested, and two threshold hurdles for these new cases are apparent, says Laura Brookover of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • State Trust Taxes Ripe For Constitutional Challenges

    Toni Ann Kruse

    Fielding v. Commissioner of Revenue is the most recent in a series of cases that have used the U.S. Constitution to curtail the ability of states to impose their income taxes on nongrantor irrevocable trusts. Toni Ann Kruse and Melissa Price of McDermott Will & Emery LLP discuss the implications of this trend.

  • Prospects For Tax Policy In The 116th Congress

    Evan Migdail

    Now that the results of the 2018 election are (mostly) in, Evan Migdail and Melissa Gierach at DLA Piper LLP consider what a Democratic House, Republican Senate and Trump administration may be able to accomplish in the way of tax policy during the lame-duck session and the upcoming 116th Congress.

  • The Latest On State And Federal Paid Family Leave Programs

    Kathryn Barcroft

    Only four U.S. states currently require paid family leave programs, leaving private employers across most of the country with the decision of whether to provide such leave to their employees, says Kathryn Barcroft of Solomon Law Firm PLLC.

  • Opinion

    What The 2nd Circ. Missed In Religious Trademark Case

    Paul Tarr

    The Second Circuit's decision this month in Universal Church v. Toellner appears to threaten trademark protection routinely afforded to nonprofits and businesses for marks that have established secondary meaning from common or historical terms, says Paul Tarr, head of the appellate practice at Lester Schwab Katz & Dwyer LLP.

  • NCAA Corruption And The 'Right To Control' Theory

    Kan Nawaday

    The convictions in U.S. v. Gatto for defrauding NCAA schools have shined a spotlight on the relatively obscure — but powerful — “right to control” theory of federal wire and mail fraud liability, which formed the basis for the New York federal prosecutors' case, say Kan Nawaday and Stephen Salsbury of Venable LLP.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Bryan Cave Innovation Chief Katie DeBord

    Katie DeBord

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Katie DeBord, chief innovation officer at Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.