Employment UK

  • December 09, 2022

    Ex-Glasgow Council Employee's Judicial Bias Appeal Fails

    An appellate judge dismissed most of an appeal brought by a former employee of the Glasgow City Council, rejecting arguments that the lower tribunal should have recused itself because it was biased.

  • December 09, 2022

    Council Wins Appeal Over Worker Fired For 'Bite This' Remark

    An appellate tribunal overturned on Friday a ruling that an English local authority unfairly dismissed a gym employee who told a colleague to bite his groin, finding that a lower tribunal had disregarded key evidence.

  • December 09, 2022

    Law Groups Urge SRA To U-Turn On Indemnity Fund Decision

    Several English law societies have called on the Solicitors Regulation Authority to reverse its decision to replace a statutory insurance fund that provides cover for historic negligence claims with its own indemnity scheme.

  • December 09, 2022

    Barrister Banned For Lying About Career

    The Bar Standards Board has announced that an independent tribunal has banned a barrister from practicing in the profession because he repeatedly lied about his career and business, including falsely stating he had served in the regular British Army.

  • December 09, 2022

    Employment Tribunals Get £3M To Tackle Spiraling Backlog

    Employment judges will hear up to 1,700 extra cases before April 2023 as tribunals are given a £2.85 million ($3.5 million) boost to their funding and to the number of days they operate, the Ministry of Justice said in a Thursday announcement. 

  • December 09, 2022

    Finance Boss Wins £95K Over Firing For Spouse's Disability

    An accountancy firm and two directors must pay a former finance manager almost £95,000 ($116,313) after it took disciplinary action and fired her because they assumed that she would need to take time off work to care for her disabled husband.

  • December 09, 2022

    Delayed Pension Deals Could Yield £70B Boost For Firms

    British businesses could be on the receiving end of a £70 billion ($86 billion) windfall if pension trustees delay insurance deals by five years, a consultancy said.

  • December 09, 2022

    Director Disqualified For Misusing £100K COVID Loan

    A director of a failed surveyor's firm in Scotland has been banned from managing a company for the next 11 years after he unlawfully claimed two COVID-19 government-backed loans totaling £100,000 ($123,000) that he then used for his personal benefit.

  • December 09, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen the Danish tax authority bring its $2.1 billion lawsuit over pension plans against commodities trader ED&F Man to the U.K., a Nigerian record label sue Warner Music for breach of contract, and DAC Beachcroft face fresh litigation from a hotel investor. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • December 09, 2022

    UK Unveils Sweeping Financial Regulatory Overhaul

    The government unveiled a package of reforms to financial regulation on Friday that it says will help the financial services sector capitalize on the country's departure from the European Union, including plans to discard some of the safeguards erected after the banking crisis.

  • December 08, 2022

    Linklaters Launches Scheme To Hire Solicitor Apprentices

    Linklaters LLP said Thursday it will start taking on solicitor apprentices next year, calling on all City law firms to join forces to boost the number of apprentices in London's financial heart.

  • December 08, 2022

    Property Investor Faces Sex Harassment Claims In £8M Suit

    A property consultant is suing a U.K. investment firm for £8.3 million ($10 million), alleging it tore up their contract after he accused the company's director of subjecting him to a "campaign of sexual harassment."

  • December 08, 2022

    Gov't Plans Further Legislation To Limit Strikes In Key Sectors

    The British government is considering legislating minimum service levels during strikes by emergency services workers, as high levels of industrial unrest continue.

  • December 08, 2022

    Investment Banks Settle £5.7M Broker-Poaching Suit

    Investment banks Stifel Nicolaus and Jefferies International settled on the eve of a court date a £5.7 million ($6.9 million) claim accusing Jefferies of poaching six former Stifel employees who allegedly shared trade secrets with their new employer.

  • December 08, 2022

    Advisers In £44M Pensions Misselling Scheme Get 10 Yr. Bans

    Three men have been banned from serving as company directors because of their role in a £44 million pensions misselling scandal, the government said on Thursday.

  • December 08, 2022

    UK Defined Benefit Pensions Savings Drop 60% Over Decade

    The number of people actively saving in final salary-type retirement plans has slipped by more than 60% in a decade, according to figures released by The Pensions Regulator on Thursday, as employees are increasingly enrolled into newer defined contribution schemes.

  • December 08, 2022

    Pensions Reform Could Spark £1.2B Annual Savings Rise

    The government has been urged to close the long-term savings gap, after a report found that workers could save an additional £1.2 billion ($1.5 billion) a year for retirement if pensions enrollment was reformed.

  • December 07, 2022

    UK Legal Sector Revenues Grow By 12.5%

    The international legal services and dispute resolution industry in the United Kingdom generated £41 billion ($50 billion) between 2021 and 2022, further strengthening its leading status in the world, new research from TheCityUK says.

  • December 07, 2022

    Black Teacher Overlooked For New Job Wins £463K Payout

    A tribunal has ruled that a chain of schools must pay a Black teacher around £463,000 ($565,000) for unfair dismissal after it removed her as a head of year without giving her a similar position during a reorganization.

  • December 07, 2022

    More Law Firms Join Part-Time Solicitor Training Project

    Bates Wells, Browne Jacobson LLP and Freeths LLP have signed up for a program launched by the Law Society in 2021 that seeks to make it easier to become a solicitor by providing aspiring lawyers with training on a part-time basis.

  • December 07, 2022

    Ex-British Council Worker Says She Was Unfairly Sacked

    A human resources manager based in Dubai argued on Wednesday that a London tribunal has the jurisdiction to deal with her unfair dismissal and discrimination claim against the British Council, saying that she couldn't argue her case in the Gulf state's courts.

  • December 07, 2022

    Union Tells FCA To Improve Worker Pay, Conditions

    Members of a leading trade union working at the Financial Conduct Authority have told the watchdog it should implement a staff-led action plan for improving pay and working conditions in order to stymie staff attrition and boost worker morale.

  • December 07, 2022

    Gov't To Compensate Victims Of Post Office IT Scandal

    The government unveiled a compensation scheme on Wednesday for postmasters who helped expose the Post Office Horizon IT scandal, which caused one of the gravest miscarriages of justice in recent British history, including some redress for "reasonable" legal expenses.

  • December 07, 2022

    Courier Prevails In Discrimination Suit Against DPD

    A courier with hearing difficulties has persuaded a London tribunal that delivery company DPD Group discriminated against him when it failed to provide him with necessary services such as a trained helper during a disciplinary hearing that led to his dismissal.

  • December 07, 2022

    EU Says COVID Is Occupational Disease Amid UK Push

    European Union member states should class COVID-19 as an occupational disease and entitle people who contract the virus at work to compensation, the bloc's executive arm said on Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Digital Nomads: Key Considerations For Global Businesses

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    As employers and employees embrace remote, location-independent work arrangements enabled by technology, they must be mindful of the employment law and tax consequences such arrangements may trigger, say Hannah Wilkins and Audrey Elliott at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • German Labor Court Takes Surprising Stance On Disclosure

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    A German labor court's recent ruling regarding an employer's disclosure of the number and names of employees identified as "severely disabled" will surprise practitioners in the data protection and diversity spaces, who may question the justification for aspects of the decision, say Hannah Disselbeck and Marco Hermann at Fieldfisher.

  • A Look At The Increase In Employee Ownership Trusts

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    The rise in employee ownership trusts has brought certain challenges, but with tax advantages and a proven positive impact on individuals, businesses and regional economies, employee buyouts are set to become more popular and could outstrip mainstream deal activity, says ​​​​​​​Lisa Hayward at Birketts.

  • Employment Ruling Takes A New Look At Settlement Waivers

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    The recent Scottish Employment Appeal Tribunal decision in Bathgate v. Technip U.K. demonstrates that a waiver in a settlement agreement must relate expressly to the circumstances of the individual case, and that it is no longer possible to dismiss a prospective claim simply by including a reference to unfair dismissal or the Equality Act 2010, says David Whincup at Squire Patton.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • Employment Ruling Shows Value Of Dismissal Alternatives

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    The recent Employment Appeal Tribunal ruling in Department of Work and Pensions v. Boyers demonstrates that employers should ensure that alternatives have been properly considered before dismissing a disabled employee, since it can be difficult to show that a proportionate approach has been taken in the decision-making process, say Asten Hawkes and Larissa Hawkins at BDB Pitmans.

  • How Proposed Forced Labor Product Ban Affects Biz With EU

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    The European Commission's recently proposed regulation banning products made with forced labor in the European Union highlights the importance for multinational companies to enhance their human rights due diligence programs to meet fast-evolving standards and requirements of doing business in the region, say Sarah Bishop and Paul Mertenskötter at Covington.

  • FCA Pension Scheme Case Highlights Issues Ripe For Reform

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    The Financial Conduct Authority's response to the British Steel Pension Scheme case exposed wider issues within its regulatory approach and could demonstrate the need for industrywide reforms to minimize the risks with transferring out of a pension scheme, say Oliver Reece and Larisa Gordan at PwC.

  • Holiday Entitlement Ruling May Affect Employer Practices

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    Following the recent decision of Harpur Trust v. Brazel, employers may want to consider some practical options and review their processes to ensure that workers with irregular hours receive their paid holiday entitlement, say Alex Fisher and Anna West at Travers Smith.

  • How The Rise Of Brand Activism Is Affecting Employment Law

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    As the choice of employer and its values is increasingly seen as an extension of an employee's personal brand, a number of employment law issues come to the fore, including employers' rights to restrict their employees' behaviors and employees' rights to express their own views, says James Davies at Lewis Silkin.

  • Changes The New UK PM May Bring To Workers' Rights

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    U.K. Prime Minister Liz Truss is considering the removal of a significant number of EU regulations, which could lead to a reduction in rights for workers such as equal pay and holiday pay, arguably going against the principles of the U.K.-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, say Sean Nesbitt and Anneliese Amoah at Taylor Wessing.

  • What New French Whistleblower Law Means For Companies

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    A French law that recently entered into force broadens the definition of whistleblower and simplifies the reporting process, creating a new system that offers added protection but may well increase the number of reports made to authorities, say Alexandre Bisch and Fanny Gauthier at Debevoise.

  • Why Risk-Based Employee Conduct Policies Are Advisable

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    In establishing employee conduct policies, companies should consider the extent to which they are exposed to certain types of risk, such as bribery and corruption, as establishing clear written standards offers a step toward avoiding criminal liability, says Steve Melrose at Bellevue Law.

  • Steps Businesses Can Take To Mitigate AI Discrimination Bias

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    There are risks that artificial intelligence systems can result in actionable discrimination in recruitment and employment processes, and to mitigate bias businesses should ensure there is informed human involvement, putting in place suitable policy frameworks to reflect their values and positions on diversity, says David Lorimer at Fieldfisher.

  • New FCA Listing Rules May Start Regulatory Shift On Diversity

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    Listed companies that fail to meet new Financial Conduct Authority rules for minimum executive board diversity currently risk reputational damage mainly through social scrutiny, but should prepare for potential regulatory enforcement actions, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

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