Food & Beverage

  • November 25, 2020

    Monsanto, BASF Get $265M Dicamba Verdict Slashed To $75M

    A Missouri federal judge on Wednesday cut a punitive damages award that a Missouri farm won against Monsanto and BASF in a bellwether trial over claims the weedkiller dicamba ruined the farm's peach trees from $250 million to $60 million, ruling that the case involved only economic damages as opposed to physical harm.

  • November 25, 2020

    Pryor Cashman Guides SBE In $300M AccorHotels Takeover

    Pryor Cashman LLP has represented SBE Entertainment Group in AccorHotels' $300 million cash purchase of the hospitality company's remaining 50% interest, completing the Paris-based hotel giant's takeover that began with its 2018 purchase of a 50% stake in SBE's luxury hotel brands.

  • November 25, 2020

    Up Next At High Court: Census Fight, Child Slavery Claims

    Kicking off its final oral arguments of the year, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday will hear the Trump administration's efforts to exclude unauthorized immigrants from the population count and a bid by Nestlé and Cargill to escape liability for alleged child slavery.

  • November 25, 2020

    Pebble Mine's Future Dims As Key Permit Is Denied

    The Army Corps of Engineers on Wednesday said it will not approve a critical water permit for a controversial gold and copper mine in Alaska, saying the project's environmental harms are too great, even considering the estimated economic benefits.

  • November 25, 2020

    Coke Bottler Accused Of 'Glaring' ERISA Breach In 401(k) Suit

    Former employees of the country's largest Coca-Cola bottler have hit the company, its board and its benefits committee with a proposed class action in North Carolina federal court, alleging they mismanaged their retirement portfolio and participated in a "glaring breach" of their fiduciary duties under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

  • November 25, 2020

    Microsoft Unit Targeted In Food Delivery App Fight Doc Bid

    A Microsoft unit that provides hosting for software development is being targeted by a Luxembourg company for information to help it fend off arbitration initiated by the founder of Hungerstation, Saudi Arabia's largest food delivery app, over control of the company.

  • November 25, 2020

    Trump Says DOJ Can Stop Enviro Project Settlements

    The Trump administration told a Massachusetts federal court that it had the discretion to reach settlements as it saw fit, pushing to end a suit by environmental advocates that said the U.S. Department of Justice's policy banning environmental improvement projects in enforcement settlements is unlawful.

  • November 25, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Ahead of the long weekend, when Americans are most known for gathering and traveling, Thanksgiving-minded governors laid down more restrictions as COVID-19 cases continued surging over the past week.

  • November 25, 2020

    Smithfield Unit Accused Of Polluting Los Angeles River

    A California man claims stormwater runoff from Smithfield Foods' hog and meat processing plants in Los Angeles County is degrading a river's aquatic life and scenic views from a downstream park, in violation of environmental laws.

  • November 25, 2020

    4 Key Insurance Appeals To Watch In December

    Appeals courts will take on several important insurance coverage issues in 2020's final month, with the Delaware Supreme Court set to weigh whether an excess insurer must contribute to Dole's $222 million settlements of stockholder suits and Indiana's high court primed to consider whether a ransomware attack is covered by crime insurance. Here, Law360 breaks down four insurance appeals attorneys will be watching in December.

  • November 24, 2020

    Restaurant Group Can't Halt LA County Outdoor Dining Ban

    A California state judge on Tuesday rejected a restaurant industry group's emergency bid to stop an outdoor dining ban from taking effect in Los Angeles County, ruling that not enough evidence was presented to halt the impending shutdown.

  • November 24, 2020

    4th Circ. Says OT Exemption Wrongly Used In Tip-Pooling Suit

    Tipped workers at a North Carolina sushi restaurant won a partial revival Tuesday of a Fair Labor Standards Act suit, with the Fourth Circuit ruling that a lower court had erred in applying a commission-based exemption to the federal law's overtime requirements.

  • November 24, 2020

    Luckin Coffee, Banks Seek Nix Of Shareholder Securities Suit

    Chinese coffeehouse chain Luckin Coffee and its underwriters filed dual motions Monday asking a New York federal judge to dismiss shareholder class action claims that their negligence and misinformation caused the company's stock to plunge following news of hundreds of millions of dollars in fabricated sales.

  • November 24, 2020

    DoorDash Delivers $2.5M Settlement In DC AG's Tips Suit

    DoorDash and the Washington, D.C., Attorney General's Office told a D.C. judge Tuesday they agreed to a $2.5 million settlement of a lawsuit alleging the food delivery company misrepresented how tips paid by customers would be distributed to couriers.

  • November 24, 2020

    Kroger Says Apron Symbol For Workers Isn't LGBTQ-Related

    Kroger Co. is urging a federal judge to toss a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit brought on behalf of two Christian workers who alleged the grocery chain put a symbol on their aprons in support of the LGBTQ community, saying the logo has nothing to do with sexual orientation.  

  • November 24, 2020

    Minn. Gov. To Float COVID-19 Tax Relief In Special Session

    Minnesota's governor on Tuesday proposed tax credits for food donations as part of a package of novel coronavirus relief options, but said a proposal to forgive sales tax for businesses could present challenges.

  • November 24, 2020

    States, Cities Seek Demise Of Trump's Narrowed Water Rule

    A group of states on Monday asked a federal judge to scrap the Trump administration's rule narrowing the scope of the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction, saying the government failed to study how excluding many previously protected waters would harm water quality and step on states' rights.

  • November 24, 2020

    Vegan Food Co. To Appeal Okla. Food Label Law Ruling

    A vegan food company said Monday it is appealing to the Tenth Circuit a recent order by an Oklahoma federal judge who refused to block a state law that requires plant-based food companies to include a disclaimer if they use a meat term to describe their products.

  • November 24, 2020

    Law Firms Say Botched BP Oil Spill Claims Time-Barred

    A group of law firms have asked a Louisiana federal judge to toss a lawsuit brought by local fishermen accusing the firms of mishandling their clients' requests for compensation following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010, arguing that the alleged claims are time-barred.

  • November 24, 2020

    Apple's Bottled Water Supplier Sues Cos. Over Dirty Delivery

    Vita Water has filed a product liability suit against its bottled water suppliers in Texas federal court, alleging their first shipment to its largest customer, Apple, was so contaminated that live protozoa could be seen through a microscope "wriggling" in the water.

  • November 24, 2020

    GOP Reps. Seek GAO Audit Of Ag Dept. Rural Broadband Pilot

    Nearly a dozen House Republicans have asked the Government Accountability Office to probe the operations of a pilot program run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fund rural broadband projects, saying they worry millions of dollars are going to waste.

  • November 24, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Lennar, Goldman Properties, Greenberg

    Lennar has reportedly paid $29 million for 43.7 acres in Florida, Goldman Properties is said to have dropped $5.2 million on two Miami properties, and investor Scott Greenberg is reportedly hoping to build a Chicago arena where as many as 80 people could gather to play virtual reality games.

  • November 24, 2020

    Manhattan Grocer Dean & DeLuca Gets Ch. 11 Plan Approval

    Upscale New York grocery chain Dean & DeLuca received approval Tuesday from a bankruptcy judge there for its Chapter 11 plan of reorganization arising from a global deal with its unsecured creditors and bank lenders.

  • November 24, 2020

    Pa. Retailers Accused Of Wrongly Charging Tax On Masks

    Several Pennsylvania retailers and big-box stores, including Walmart and Home Depot, wrongly charged sales tax on tax-exempt protective face masks and face coverings, claimed a proposed class action filed in a state court.

  • November 24, 2020

    Soy Milk Maker Pushes To Toss Vanilla False Ad Claims

    The Hain Celestial Group Inc. is asking a New York federal judge to throw out a suit alleging that its vanilla soy milk misleads consumers into thinking it's made exclusively with vanilla extract, saying reasonable buyers understand the "vanilla" in the product's name refers to its flavoring, not a promise about ingredients.

Expert Analysis

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

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    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • Carbon Capture Policy Should Be Aligned For Global Adoption

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    With support from both Republicans and Democrats, carbon capture, utilization and storage technology as a tool for decarbonization may be poised for domestic growth — but the U.S. and the European Union must coordinate their policies to promote a global approach, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • How Joe Biden Will Change The FDA: Part 2

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    When the Biden administration takes control of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, companies can expect to see increased attention to the safety of medical devices, the rigor of audits and inspections, and the concerns of consumer advocacy groups, say attorneys at Covington.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

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    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • How Federal, State Plans Could Bring Carbon Capture To US

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    Proposals from President-elect Joe Biden, a pair of bills currently pending in Congress and a low-carbon fuels program in California provide insights into how carbon capture, utilization and storage technology could be integrated into the fight against climate change in the U.S., say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe.

  • How Joe Biden Will Change The FDA: Part 1

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    During the Trump administration, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has tended to issue warning letters and other regulatory tools to secure voluntary corrective actions, but the Biden administration is likely to pursue more vigorous judicial enforcement, including through consent decrees and criminal referrals, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

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    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • EU Climate Goals Are Hard To Reach Without Carbon Capture

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    The European Union's failure to fully embrace blue fuels, produced using carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies, may hinder the region's pursuit of its aggressive decarbonization goals, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

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    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Carbon Capture Tech Offers A Fast Path Toward Climate Goals

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    To meet ambitious climate goals, the U.S., EU and other developed nations must immediately start reducing carbon emissions from fossil fuels, which policymakers can encourage by supporting carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe.

  • Beware Atty Ethics Rules When Reporting COVID-19 Fraud

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    Attorneys considering blowing the whistle on False Claims Act violations by recipients of COVID-19 relief may face a number of ethical constraints on their ability to disclose client information and file qui tam actions, say Breon Peace and Jennifer Kennedy Park at Cleary.

  • Looking For Judicial Activists? Check The Footnotes

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    U.S. Supreme Court nominees typically face intense questioning over potential judicial activism, but a better way to gauge judges' activist tendencies may be to look at the footnotes in their opinions, say Christopher Collier at Hawkins Parnell and Michael Arndt at Rohan Law.

  • Best Practices For Legal Technology Adoption

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    The pandemic has accelerated the need to improve the practice of law through technology, but law firms and in-house legal departments must first ensure they have employee buy-in and well-defined processes for new digital tools, say Dan Broderick at BlackBoiler and Daryl Shetterly at Orrick.

  • Valuation Uncertainty Could Prompt Increased Litigation

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    The COVID-19 pandemic has increased volatility around forward-looking cash flows and discount rates, which may lead to more business valuation disputes, particularly in the M&A and bankruptcy litigation contexts, say analysts at Cornerstone Research.

  • The Pandemic's Long-Term Impact On Law Firm Operations

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    Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey looks at how pandemic-era remote work has changed the way law firms operate — from shifts in secretarial functions to associate professional development — and explains why some alterations may be here to stay.

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