Food & Beverage

  • May 26, 2020

    Pittsburgh Restaurant Accused Of Using Virus To Break Lease

    A restaurant slated for a historic downtown Pittsburgh building is using delays caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to break its lease, according to a complaint the landlord filed Tuesday in Pennsylvania state court.

  • May 26, 2020

    Giant Eagle Accused Of Flouting ADA With Face Mask Policy

    Giant Eagle Inc. refused to accommodate a Pittsburgh-area woman’s respiratory-related disability through its enforcement of a company policy requiring all shoppers to wear face masks due to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • May 26, 2020

    Mass. Justices OK Ballot Question To Change Booze Rules

    Massachusetts' high court said Tuesday that a proposed ballot initiative easing restrictions on alcohol sales passes legal muster, paving the way for the question to go before voters in November.

  • May 26, 2020

    Suit Over 'Illegal' CBD Products Paused To Await FDA Rules

    A California federal court has paused a proposed class action accusing a CBD company of hawking products that aren't compliant with U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines, saying the case should wait until the agency unveils new cannabinoid regulations.

  • May 26, 2020

    Farm Wants 8th Circ. To Review Its Ruling In Silo Damage Suit

    A farming company asked the Eighth Circuit on Tuesday to reconsider its finding that damage to grain silos was not an "accident" because it was a foreseeable result of shoddy workmanship, saying the panel's decision goes against precedent and essentially eliminates general liability coverage for contractors.

  • May 26, 2020

    Tyson Asks To Be Named Victor In Antitrust Suit

    Tyson Chicken is asking to be declared the winner in a battle with a flock of chicken farmers who have accused the company of flouting antitrust laws by using a secretive tournament-style process to decide who gets paid what.

  • May 26, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    The COVID-19 pandemic found states monitoring scaled back Memorial Day weekend festivities that went off without a hitch in some places and resulted in crowd-limit violations in others, signaling challenges ahead as the beach season vies with continuing public health safety mandates.

  • May 26, 2020

    Whole Foods-Anchored Fla. Center Trades Hands For $47M

    A Zurich Alternative Asset Management fund has purchased a Whole Foods-anchored retail center in Coral Gables, Florida, for $46.75 million, according to an announcement Tuesday from sell-side broker Jones Lang LaSalle.

  • May 22, 2020

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    They've represented consumers, companies, and government entities, taken on Goliaths in industries ranging from aerospace to health care to finance to technology to sports, and won landmark victories on behalf of clients across the country.

  • May 22, 2020

    Ex-Bumble Bee CEO Set For June In-Person Sentencing

    A California federal judge outlined new coronavirus-related courtroom protocols on Friday for when he holds an in-person sentencing for Bumble Bee's former CEO next month, saying plexiglass barriers are going up in the courtroom, the hearing will be limited to 10 attendees and all must take elevators individually and wear masks.

  • May 22, 2020

    Curtis Expands In Milan With 2 Tax Partners And Counsel

    Curtis Mallet-Prevost Colt & Mosle LLP has added a pair of attorneys with experience in legal actions involving global brands such as Gucci and Parmalat to its Milan office, along with a new tax counsel.

  • May 22, 2020

    Brewer Says It Fixed Case Against AB InBev, Molson

    A Wisconsin brewery says it's prepared a new antitrust complaint accusing Anheuser-Busch InBev and Molson Coors of restricting American beer exports to Ontario, Canada, that establishes direct connections between the defendants and the alleged collusion, a missing element that caused the previous complaint to get tossed in April.

  • May 22, 2020

    Oregon Homeowner Drops RICO Suit Over Pot Farm Stench

    An Oregon federal court has ended a homeowner's long-running racketeering suit over marijuana farm odors after the last of more than 220 original defendants were dismissed from the case, which named scores of entities tied to a single grower.

  • May 22, 2020

    Justices Told Not To Hear Doctrine Of Equivalents Challenge

    The U.S. International Trade Commission and Japanese food conglomerate Ajinomoto are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to keep a Federal Circuit rule on when patent infringement can be found under the doctrine of equivalents, the latest two to weigh in on the closely watched issue.

  • May 22, 2020

    9th Circ. Urged To Undo Buyers' Cert. In Tuna Antitrust Fight

    The Washington Legal Foundation is backing a petition by the country's three largest tuna producers to vacate the certification of a consumer price-fixing class, telling the Ninth Circuit that a district judge erroneously allowed three separate classes of buyers to "manufacture" claims that they all suffered the same injuries.

  • May 22, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Chetrit, Altaris, Zurich Insurance

    Isaac Chetrit has reportedly paid $28.7 million for a New York development site, Altaris Capital is said to have picked up a California building from a 3M spinoff for $35.7 million, and a Zurich Insurance arm has reportedly bought a Whole Foods-anchored retail space in Florida for $46.75 million.

  • May 22, 2020

    Borden Dairy Sets June Auction For Possible Ch. 11 Sale

    A Delaware judge on Friday approved plans for Borden Dairy Co. to hold an auction next month to potentially sell its assets, as the milk supplier continues to pursue a dual Chapter 11 path that could sell assets or set a plan to restructure its debt and business.

  • May 22, 2020

    Tyson Foods Slammed With Wrongful COVID-19 Death Suit

    The family of a former Tyson Foods meatpacking plant employee who died after contracting COVID-19 has hit the meat processor with a wrongful death lawsuit, saying she was forced to work during the pandemic without proper protective gear.

  • May 22, 2020

    Marston's, Carlsberg Ink Deal To Form £780M UK Brewing JV

    Marston's and Carlsberg have agreed to form a British brewing joint venture that is valued at roughly £780 million ($951 million) and will house brands including Pedigree, Hobgoblin and Danish Pilsner beers, the companies said Friday.

  • May 21, 2020

    9th Circ. Partly Revives Sonic Worker's Sex Harassment Suit

    A split Ninth Circuit panel ruled Wednesday that a trial court wrongly dismissed a claim by a former Sonic franchise worker over sexual harassment and retaliation as "duplicative" during trial, remanding the case for further proceedings and rejecting legal fees that had been awarded to the fast-food chain.

  • May 21, 2020

    Fed. Judge Won't Pause Pa.'s COVID-19 Biz Closure Order

    A federal judge denied a bid by business owners and political candidates to temporarily suspend Pennsylvania's COVID-19 shutdown order, saying his court "will not micromanage public policy in the midst of a pandemic."

  • May 21, 2020

    Judge Urges End To Suit Over Papa Murphy's $190M Merger

    A Washington federal magistrate judge recommended pizza chain operator Papa Murphy's and its financial adviser be dismissed from a putative securities class action accusing the pick-up and delivery company of downplaying its finances ahead of a $190 million merger that allegedly gave investors too small of a slice.

  • May 21, 2020

    Restaurant Consumers Eye Final Settlement OK In TCPA Suit

    Consumers have asked a California federal judge for his final signoff on a $4 million class action settlement to end a suit that claimed a restaurant consulting company violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act through a text-messaging campaign for quick-service chain A&W.

  • May 21, 2020

    US Trustee Balks At Borden's Ch. 11 Executive Bonus Plans

    The U.S. Trustee's Office Thursday asked the Delaware bankruptcy court to reject milk producer Borden Dairy Co.'s request to pay up to $2 million in bonuses to top executives, saying the company has not justified the payments in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • May 21, 2020

    Lawsuit Says New Calif. Water Contracts Ignored Environment

    The federal government has illegally converted short-term contracts that allow the transfer of California water to largely agricultural areas into permanent ones, environmental groups said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For A Deluge Of COVID-19 Whistleblower Claims

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Proskauer break down the kinds of COVID-19 whistleblower retaliation claims employers should anticipate, and explain key steps to minimize risks under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, National Labor Relations Act, Families First Coronavirus Response Act, and state laws.

  • A Guide To Evaluating And Advertising COVID-19 Products

    Author Photo

    As businesses evaluate products claiming to make workplaces safer during the pandemic, or look at marketing such products themselves, they should be aware of the highly regulated world of disease prevention claims if they wish to avoid enforcement and private litigation, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Opinion

    Credibility Concerns About Virtual Arbitration Are Unfounded

    Author Photo

    Concerns that videoconferenced arbitration hearings compromise an arbitrator's ability to reliably resolve credibility contests are based on mistaken perceptions of how many cases actually turn on credibility, what credibility means in the legal world, and how arbitrators make credibility determinations, says Wayne Brazil at JAMS.

  • 2 New Accounting Fraud Cases Offer Lessons For Boards

    Author Photo

    Luckin Coffee and TAL Education Group — two high-profile Chinese companies listed in the U.S. — recently announced suspected cases of colossal revenue fraud, and these case studies may help companies recognize the germinating seeds of accounting fraud, say Fabian Roday at Fangda Partners and William Fotherby at Meredith Connell.

  • Traps For The Unwary In Class Actions Targeting PPP Lenders

    Author Photo

    Recent class actions challenging how lenders prioritized Paycheck Protection Program applications or alleging failure to pay agent fees to those facilitating loan applications may be based on the flimsiest of legal theories, however risks still exist, as we saw earlier this month in a Michigan federal court decision, say Richard Gottlieb and Brett Natarelli at Manatt.

  • Opinion

    Fla. Sports Bar's COVID-19 Insurance Claim Should Proceed

    Author Photo

    Florida-based Prime Time Sports Grill's lawsuit seeking insurance coverage for COVID-19 business interruption should withstand Certain Underwriters at Lloyd's of London's motion to dismiss because the insurer's arguments ignore physical loss caused by the pandemic and are not supported by relevant case law, says Micah Skidmore at Haynes and Boone.

  • How CFTC's Agricultural Enforcement May Evolve Amid Crisis

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission recently singled out agricultural commodities market manipulation as an area of focus, potentially representing a return to the agency’s core mission that could shape enforcement during the current crisis, say attorneys at Latham.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Client Service Continuity Planning

    Author Photo

    Ensuring uninterrupted client service and compliance with ethical obligations in a time when attorneys are more likely to fall ill means taking six basic — yet often ignored — steps to build some redundancy and internal communication into legal practice, say attorneys at Axinn.

  • Fla. Suit Reveals Insurer Defense Against COVID-19 Coverage

    Author Photo

    A motion recently filed in Florida federal court by a Lloyd's insurer seeking to dismiss policyholder Prime Time Sports Grill's lawsuit provides insight into how insurers might argue against coverage for business income losses related to COVID-19, say attorneys at Goldberg Segalla.

  • A Primer On Foreign Judgment Enforcement In Canada

    Author Photo

    Given the expected rise in disputes between U.S. and Canadian companies due to the pandemic, David Ziegler at Fasken Martineau breaks down the factors Canadian courts consider when determining whether to recognize and enforce a judgment from a U.S. or other foreign court.

  • Virtual Meetings Could Be Fertile Ground For Legal Discovery

    Author Photo

    Many remote meeting technologies include recording features as default settings, raising three primary concerns from a legal discovery and data retention perspective, and possibly bringing unintended consequences for companies in future litigation, says Courtney Murphy at Clark Hill.

  • How Courts May Interpret COVID-19 Waivers Of Liability

    Author Photo

    As businesses begin to reopen, they may seek to release themselves from negligence claims for COVID-19 infections through contractual waivers of liability, but whether a waiver is enforceable varies significantly by state, says Jessica Kelly at Sherin and Lodgen.

  • Contingent Fees A Great Option For Cos. During Downturn

    Author Photo

    In-house counsel may assume that "elite" law firms will turn up their noses at the idea of contingent fees, but such arrangements, whether pure or hybrid, are offered by many firms — even to defendants — and may be the answer to tight litigation budgets, say attorneys at Fish & Richardson.

  • Opinion

    9 Ways To Improve The Paycheck Protection Program

    Author Photo

    The CARES Act's well-intentioned Paycheck Protection Program has problems, and Congress should take steps to better protect small businesses and define several terms that continue to cause confusion, says Samantha Block, a judicial clerk at the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

  • The Role Of Remote Mediation After The Crisis Is Over

    Author Photo

    When the dark cloud of COVID-19 has passed and resolution centers are once again peopled with warring parties and aspiring peacemakers, remote mediations will likely still be common, but they are not going to be a panacea for all that ails the dispute resolution industry, says Mitch Orpett at Tribler Orpett.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!