We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

California

  • July 20, 2018

    Boies Partner, Ex-MoFo Attys Tapped For Calif. Bench

    California Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday announced 18 judicial appointments, including a Boies, Schiller & Flexner partner, two former Morrison & Foerster LLP attorneys, and former Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP, Sidley Austin LLP, Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP, and Irell & Manella LLP attorneys.

  • July 20, 2018

    Acadia Hit With Securities Suit Over Drug Linked To Deaths

    An Acadia Pharmaceuticals Inc. shareholder slapped the biopharmaceutical company with a putative securities fraud class action in California federal court Thursday, claiming the company inflated its stock price by hiding safety risks and downplaying reports of deaths connected to its treatment for hallucinations and delusions.

  • July 20, 2018

    Truckers Fight Calif.'s New Independent Contractor Standard

    A nonprofit trade association representing some 6,000 trucking operators has filed suit in California federal court asking a judge to find that federal law supersedes a recent landmark state Supreme Court ruling redefining employees versus contractors that some observers say could devastate the industry.

  • July 20, 2018

    Weinstein Judge Lets 'Children Of The Corn' Suit Go Ahead

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Thursday lifted a Chapter 11 stay clearing the way for a movie producer to resume his lawsuit in California federal court against The Weinstein Co. disputing sequel, remake and spinoff rights to the 1984 horror film “Children of the Corn.”

  • July 20, 2018

    Oncologist Says Roundup Caused Groundskeeper's Cancer

    The active ingredient in Monsanto's weed killers caused a retired groundskeeper's non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the former medical director of the University of Chicago's cancer center testified Friday during a first-of-its-kind California jury trial on whether the company should have warned consumers about its pesticides' cancer risks.

  • July 20, 2018

    9th Circ. Says Ore. County Can’t Collect $2.3M Defect Award

    An Oregon county can’t sue a subcontractor’s insurers to help pay for a damaged bridge, the Ninth Circuit affirmed Friday, finding that the insurance arrangement spelled out in the subcontractor’s work agreement is strictly verboten under Beaver State law.

  • July 20, 2018

    11 Firms To Steer IPOs Topping $3B In Busy Summer Stretch

    Eleven firms will steer initial public offerings by 11 companies that are projected to raise more than $3.3 billion during the week of July 23, led by an estimated $1.5 billion offering from a Chinese e-commerce giant, potentially setting up a furious finish for the month.

  • July 20, 2018

    J&J Faces Bid To Revive Cancer Victim's $417M Talc Win

    A woman whose cancer-stricken mother won a $417 million jury verdict saying Johnson & Johnson's talcum baby powder caused her ovarian cancer has appealed a California judge’s “about-face” decision to vacate the award, arguing in a brief Wednesday that there was sufficient evidence to support the jury’s finding.

  • July 20, 2018

    Mexican Accused Of Human Smuggling Denied DACA Redo

    A California federal judge said Friday he won’t reconsider a decision allowing the government to revoke a Mexico native’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals status amid suspicions he smuggled humans, finding federal authorities were in line with enforcement policies when they made the determination.

  • July 20, 2018

    Advocates Want Monitor For Immigrant Family Reunifications

    Immigrant advocates have asked a California federal judge to appoint an independent monitor to oversee the Trump administration's compliance with the so-called Flores Settlement Agreement, arguing that the government had not provided a written plan to quickly reunify immigrant children with their families.

  • July 20, 2018

    Apple User Fights To Win Cert. In HD False Ad Suit

    A California judge appeared unswayed Friday by an attorney who argued the judge should change his mind and certify a class of consumers who accuse Apple Inc. of "watering down" movies and shows that are advertised as high-definition, so they can be downloaded nearly instantaneously on Apple TV products.

  • July 20, 2018

    Calif. Court Revives Time Warner Tax Fight With LA County

    A California state appeals court on Thursday found that a Los Angeles County assessor can include revenue from Time Warner Cable Inc.’s broadband and telephone services in valuing the right to use the public rights-of-ways for the purposes of property taxes, partially reversing a trial court ruling over a $10 million property tax refund.

  • July 20, 2018

    How A Fla. Ruling Ignited A Surge In Online ADA Suits

    In the year since a Florida federal judge became the first to find that a company’s website violated a visually impaired customer’s rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the ruling has been both an inspiration and “bully stick," spurring a surge in litigation that attorneys say could wind up in the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • July 20, 2018

    Ariosa Can't Shake $27M Verdict In Illumina Prenatal IP Row

    A California federal judge on Thursday refused to toss a $27 million verdict against Roche unit Ariosa Diagnostics Inc. for infringing Illumina Inc.'s patents for at-home prenatal testing technology, but allowed Ariosa to continue selling two versions of its tests.

  • July 20, 2018

    Apple’s $16.5M App Auto-Renew Deal Gets Initial OK

    A California judge on Friday preliminarily approved Apple Inc.’s $16.5 million deal with a certified class of 4 million customers who have accused the tech giant of automatically renewing application subscriptions on their iPads, AppleTVs and iPhones without their consent.

  • July 20, 2018

    9th Circ. Rebuffs Latest Bid To Dump Kids' Climate Suit

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday rejected another bid to undo a judge's green light for 21 children to sue the U.S. government for allegedly endangering them and future generations with policies that contribute to climate change, the latest setback for the Trump administration in its efforts to nix the suit.

  • July 20, 2018

    Wells Fargo Beats Ex-Employee's Suit Over 'Unethical' Culture

    A California federal judge on Thursday dismissed a former Wells Fargo Bank NA employee’s suit alleging he was fired for failing to meet the bank’s lofty sales targets, saying he waited too long to file his complaint.

  • July 20, 2018

    Health Hires: Wilson Sonsini, Ropes & Gray, Kirkland & Ellis

    Life sciences intellectual property lawyers made big moves recently, with Wilson Sonsini snapping up an administrative patent judge for its team and Ropes & Gray and Cantor Colburn getting IP attorneys from Fitzpatrick Cella and Locke Lord. Additionally, Kirkland and O'Melveny built up their transactions practices and Baker Donelson grew its health care team.

  • July 20, 2018

    Sunrun Investor Suit Booted With Last Chance For Fixes

    The latest iteration of an investor suit claiming Sunrun Inc. fudged customer cancellation numbers to keep its stock afloat fared no better than the first two versions, a federal judge in California found Thursday in a pithy two-page opinion chucking the complaint.

  • July 19, 2018

    Judge Referees NCAA, Athletes In Antitrust Pretrial Match

    A California federal judge on Thursday laid the ground rules for a Sept. 4 bench trial over allegations the NCAA illegally prevents athletes from being paid beyond their scholarships, requiring the parties to cut down over 2,000 exhibits, restricting layman witnesses and setting time limits on arguments.

Expert Analysis

  • Ensure All Relevant Parties Sign Arbitration Agreement

    Michael Cypers

    A California appellate court's decision in Benaroya v. Bruce Willis is one of several recent decisions teaching that if you want the ability to arbitrate against the key individuals in your counterparty, those individuals should be signatories to the arbitration clause in the underlying deal documents, say Michael Cypers and Michael Gerst of Glaser Weil Fink Howard Avchen & Shapiro LLP.

  • Biometrics And Geolocation Legislation: A Midyear Update

    Justin Kay

    In the first half of 2018, technology that determines where you are and who you are garnered significant attention. Less discussed are the legislative efforts underway in the federal government and in many states to regulate these emerging technologies, says Justin Kay of Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

  • Guest Feature

    Chris Dodd Talks Dodd-Frank, Nuremberg Trial, Hollywood

    Randy Maniloff

    Attorney Randy Maniloff recently sat down with former Sen. Christopher Dodd at his new office at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. The goal? To discover things we might not know about the author of some of the most important legislation of the last few decades.

  • New Privacy Laws' Unintended Impact On Bankruptcy Sales

    Walt Sapronov

    When the next downturn occurs, bankruptcies and opportunities for investors to pick up distressed assets on the cheap will follow. Where those assets include customer lists or other personal information protected by new privacy laws in the EU and California, those sales will become more difficult, say Walt Sapronov and Paul Kouroupas of Sapronov & Associates PC.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Roundup

    Cities In Distress

    Cities in Distress

    Five years after the city of Detroit filed for Chapter 9 bankruptcy, experts look at the financial troubles of Chicago and other U.S. cities in this special series.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.

  • How Attorney Discipline Is Evolving In The #MeToo Era

    Bonnie Frost

    In March, the American Bar Association issued a manual to help legal employers and victims fight sexual harassment in the legal profession. While automatic disbarment for sexual misconduct with clients may have been considered too harsh a sanction almost a decade ago, it may be revisited in the current climate, say Bonnie Frost and Kristi Terranova of Einhorn Harris Ascher Barbarito & Frost PC.

  • California Decision Distorts Bank Liability Under FIRREA

    Ben Singer

    A California federal judge recently concluded in United States v. Bogucki that any action by a bank employee that incurs potential liability for the bank triggers the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act. This renders unwieldy the scope of banks’ potential FIRREA exposure, says Ben Singer of O'Melveny & Myers LLP.

  • Series

    Cities In Distress: Municipal Recovery Lessons From Pa.

    Juliet Moringiello

    As we reflect on the five years since Detroit’s bankruptcy filing, Pennsylvania’s experience in intervening in its municipalities’ financial distress provides some useful insights on the problems plaguing municipalities as well as lessons for states, says professor Juliet Moringiello of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.