California

  • July 21, 2017

    Pepperdine Coach Ousted Lesbian Player, Jury Hears

    One of two former female Pepperdine basketball players suing the university over sexual orientation discrimination told a California jury on Friday that the head coach forced her off the team after she complained about the athletic staff’s harassment and being blocked from playing.

  • July 21, 2017

    Quinn Dropped Uber Due To Fixed Fee Program, Doc Says

    Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP dropped Uber Technologies Inc. as a client last fall because a fixed fee arrangement “no longer made financial sense,” according to an email disclosed Thursday in the California federal court intellectual property battle filed against Uber by the firm’s current client Waymo LLC.

  • July 21, 2017

    Orange Owes $60M For Startup-Killing IP Theft, Jury Told

    An attorney for defunct startup Telesocial Inc. told a California federal jury during closing arguments Friday that Orange SA destroyed the young company by stealing its trade secrets instead of buying its communications technology, while Orange’s attorneys denied responsibility for Telesocial’s failure and argued no theft occurred.

  • July 21, 2017

    20 Democratic AGs Ask Trump To Defend DACA Program

    A group of 20 Democratic attorneys general asked President Donald Trump on Friday to defend the Obama administration program allowing unauthorized immigrants who arrived as children to stay in the U.S., a request that came against a backdrop of opposition from some Republican state AGs and an uncommitted White House.

  • July 21, 2017

    Calif. Solar Project Moved In Enviros' Deal With Company

    Three environmental organizations, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and a Consolidated Edison Development Inc. unit on Friday said a 247-megawatt solar project in central California has been abandoned over endangered species concerns in favor of a smaller facility in a different location.

  • July 21, 2017

    Attys For VW 3.0L Vehicle Owners Score $125M In Fees

    A California federal judge on Friday approved $125 million in fees and costs for attorneys who represented owners of Volkswagen AG’s pricier 3.0-liter engine vehicles with emissions-cheating devices, according to an order that noted the fees wouldn’t pull from the class recovery funds.

  • July 21, 2017

    OPI Says Spanish Ex-Distributor Row Must Be Arbitrated

    Nail polish manufacturer OPI Products Inc. has urged a California federal court to compel a Spanish salon products distributor to arbitrate a dispute over a distribution agreement, saying it believes the Spanish company intends to violate the agreement’s arbitration provision by suing in its home country.

  • July 21, 2017

    Trump's Retreat On Climate Change Spurs State Tort Suits

    Lawsuits recently filed in California accusing fossil fuel companies of knowingly causing climate change-related damages signal a new wave of state-court climate tort litigation as the Trump administration pulls back from climate regulation, experts say, though they add that pursuing those suits will be a tall order.

  • July 21, 2017

    Nissan’s Timing Chains Pose Safety Risks, Drivers Say

    Nissan drivers alleging the automaker concealed a defectively designed timing chain tensioning system urged a California federal judge Thursday to keep alive their class action, saying they are able to sufficiently demonstrate their safety concerns.

  • July 21, 2017

    VW To Shell Out Another $154M To Calif. In Emissions Deal

    Volkswagen AG will pay another $154 million to California over the company’s use of devices to cheat environmental standards, bringing total payments over the emissions scandal to the Golden State to nearly $687 million, according to a consent decree approved Friday.

  • July 21, 2017

    Diesel Drivers Ask For Buybacks In Fiat Emissions MDL

    Drivers in multidistrict litigation in California federal court alleging that certain diesel engines in Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV vehicles were equipped with hidden software to pass emissions testing are seeking a buyback program for the affected cars, as well as monetary damages.

  • July 21, 2017

    Calif. Nutrition Co. Takes Row Over Wash. Tax To High Court

    A California-based nutrition supplement company told the U.S. Supreme Court that a lower court erroneously concluded that its mail-order business in Washington state creates a taxable connection when its wholesale channel did not actually establish or maintain a market for its retail side.

  • July 21, 2017

    FERC Backs Order Utility Can Recoup Half Of $31M Outlay

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Friday defended to the D.C. Circuit its decision entitling San Diego Gas & Electric Co. to recoup only half of $31 million it spent on a transmission project if the project is abandoned for reasons outside the utility’s control.

  • July 21, 2017

    DOL Tells Wells Fargo To Rehire, Pay Calif. Whistleblower

    The U.S. Department of Labor on Friday preliminarily ordered Wells Fargo & Co. to reinstate and pay a former Pomona, California, branch manager $577,500 in back wages, damages and other fees, after the bank terminated her allegedly for reporting private bankers were engaging in bank, wire and mail fraud.

  • July 21, 2017

    Nissan Hit With $25M Verdict For Brake Defect In Fatal Crash

    A braking system software defect in a Nissan-made SUV was the cause of a traffic accident that killed three people, a California jury held on Friday, awarding roughly $25 million to the surviving driver and family members of the deceased.

  • July 21, 2017

    Ex-LA Sheriff Baca Can't Put Off Start Of 3-Year Sentence

    Former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca can’t delay the start of a three-year prison sentence, scheduled for July 25, a California federal judge said Wednesday, ruling that Baca did not present evidence that would necessitate a new trial or a reversal of the finding that he gave false statements and obstructed an FBI investigation into inmate abuse.

  • July 21, 2017

    Illumina, Qiagen Settle DNA Sequencer Patent Dispute

    Illumina Inc. has settled patent infringement claims against rival Qiagen NV, according to a California federal judge’s order on Friday, resolving a year-old action over DNA-sequencing intellectual property.

  • July 21, 2017

    Uber Seeks Sanctions In Driver Misclassification Suit

    A law firm representing a class of Uber drivers claiming they were misclassified as independent contractors and denied appropriate tips has improperly used a list of class members to solicit future clients, Uber told a California federal court on Thursday, seeking sanctions while the drivers’ lawyers called the argument “patently frivolous.”

  • July 21, 2017

    Medical Malpractice Cases To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2017

    A bid to have the U.S. Supreme Court review a Florida statute giving patients access to hospital incident reports and a looming California ruling affecting doctors on workers' compensation panels are among the medical malpractice cases attorneys will be following in the second half of 2017. Here, Law360 takes a look at four pending cases.

  • July 21, 2017

    Calif. Realtors Want To Expand Transferable Property Tax Cap

    The California Association of Realtors wants to expand the state’s rule, currently limited by age and county, that allows homeowners to take property tax caps pegged to their house and transfer them to new homes, and the group proposed three different ways to do that Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • The Elephant In The Room: Advancing Women To Partnership

    Anusia Gillespie

    Despite more focus and investment, the numbers continue to show little progress in advancing women to the top tiers of firm leadership. Considering the irreversible nature of the transformation of the market for top talent, it is time to start experimenting and innovating from the core, rather than from the periphery, say Anusia Gillespie and Scott Westfahl of Harvard Law School.

  • How Midsize Law Firms Can Minimize Cybersecurity Threats

    K. Stefan Chin

    It can be challenging for midsize law firms to develop an enterprise cybersecurity program that mitigates the eminent threat of data breach and meets the regulatory and compliance requirements of the firm and its clients. This challenge becomes daunting when considering the steady rise in client audits, say K. Stefan Chin of Peckar & Abramson PC and John Sweeney of Logicforce.

  • What To Know About Proposed Changes To Tip-Pooling Rule

    Susan Schaecher

    The U.S. Department of Labor recently announced plans to propose a full rescission of its controversial tip-pooling restrictions. While the announcement does not immediately change existing law, it sets into motion regulatory action that could aid hospitality employers across the country, says Susan Schaecher of Fisher Phillips.

  • 9th Circ. Price Advertising Decision Threatens Retailers

    Rick Shackelford

    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Linda Rubenstein v. Neiman Marcus comes amid a wave of lawsuits targeting retailers for deceptive pricing. Though unpublished and without precedential effect, the decision will embolden plaintiffs to file similar class actions against retailers and could make it more difficult for them to succeed on motions to dismiss, say Rick Shackelford and Colin Fraser of Greenberg Traurig LLP.

  • Heller Sequels And 2nd Amendment, Still Undecided: Part 1

    Robert Ludwig

    In the first installment of this three-part series, attorney Robert W. Ludwig takes a deep dive into the controversial history of Second Amendment jurisprudence.

  • Why Amazon Is Taking To The Skies

    Dana Hobart

    Logistics companies like FedEx and UPS are considering holiday surcharges to help deliver the dizzying number of packages consumers buy online. The launch of Amazon's dedicated air cargo fleet will allow the e-commerce giant to hold its own shipping prices steady, and may portend a day when it cuts out the middlemen entirely, says Dana Hobart of Buchalter.

  • Federal Energy Procurement Programs Remain Attractive

    Taite McDonald

    The Trump administration's actions sometimes seem to favor fossil fuels at the expense of clean and innovative energy solutions. But federal energy procurement programs clearly continue to promote an integration of the two. The market for renewable energy at military and other government installations will likely continue to grow, say Taite McDonald and Stephen Bolotin of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • A Conversation With Keesal Young CISO Justin Hectus

    audio

    In this interview, legal industry analyst Ari Kaplan discusses the Electronic Discovery Reference Model questionnaire with Justin Hectus, chief information security officer at Keesal Young & Logan, a Pacific Rim-based law firm with a national litigation practice.

  • Calif. High Court Opinion Offers Little CEQA Guidance

    Arthur Coon

    The California Supreme Court's recent decision in Cleveland National Forest Foundation v. San Diego Association of Governments is not surprising, and it is undoubtedly correct. But it is disappointing that the majority’s opinion lacks significant practical or legal guidance for conducting compliant greenhouse gas analysis under the California Environmental Quality Act, says Arthur Coon of Miller Starr Regalia.

  • Why 2nd Circ. Review Of Sexual Orientation Claim Matters

    Raymond Wendell

    Considering the U.S. Supreme Court may soon determine whether Title VII prohibits sexual orientation discrimination, it's tempting to view the Second Circuit's recent decision to reconsider en banc Zarda v. Altitude Express as having little long-term consequence. But this question's history and the interests at stake caution against underestimating its importance, say Raymond Wendell and Katharine Fisher of Goldstein Borgen Dardarian & Ho.