Hospitality

  • September 23, 2022

    Casino To Pay $5.5M To End Server's Wages Class Action

    A New York federal judge granted preliminary approval for a casino's $5.5 million settlement of a class action Thursday, ending claims that Rush Street Gaming LLC owed overtime wages and failed to inform its tipped employees about required tip credit provisions prior to paying a sub-minimum wage.

  • September 23, 2022

    Ga. Comfort Suites Hotel Sues Insurer Over Trashed Room

    A Comfort Suites hotel sued its insurance company in Georgia federal court for refusing to fully cover its damages after a man barricaded himself inside a guest room and proceeded to destroy everything he could lay his hands on, including a sprinkler that caused extensive water damage.

  • September 23, 2022

    Fla. Travel Co. Says Airliner Is Flying Cubans Without License

    Florida travel service provider Volando.us sued Caribbean Airlines Ltd. in Florida federal court on Friday, accusing the airliner of encroaching on its business by illegally accepting payments and reservations through American travel companies to fly Cuban nationals to Guyana without a license.

  • September 23, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Principal, Diversified Partners, Baldwin

    Principal Life Insurance has reportedly loaned $57.9 million for an Arizona multifamily project, Diversified Partners reportedly could redevelop an Illinois golf course, and Alec Baldwin is said to be seeking a $29 million sale of a Hamptons estate.

  • September 23, 2022

    9th Circ. Asked To Overturn Decision On Tribal Casino Plans

    Anti-casino advocates in California have asked the Ninth Circuit to reverse a lower court ruling that upheld plans for a tribal gaming facility near Sacramento, arguing that the judge erred in leaning on a 2017 appellate decision that was only "advisory" and not meant to be precedential.

  • September 23, 2022

    Fla. Senator Sues DeSantis Over $1.5M Paid To Fly Migrants

    Democratic Florida state Sen. Jason Pizzo has sued GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis and administration officials over the constitutionality of using $1.5 million of COVID-19 relief funds to fly migrants from near Texas' southern border to Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts, accusing officials of spending taxpayer money on such programs before certain requirements were met.

  • September 23, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Dads Say Recent Ruling Bolsters Their Appeal

    A pair of parents convicted in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal on Friday pointed the First Circuit to a ruling by a different judge involved in the high-profile case as proof that prosecutors relied on an invalid legal theory during their trial.

  • September 23, 2022

    Cleveland Orchestra Settles Transgender Worker's Suit

    The Cleveland Orchestra on Friday settled a lawsuit filed by a transgender employee after it agreed to cover medical care associated with her gender-affirming surgery, something it previously refused.

  • September 23, 2022

    Builder In Tribal Casino Pay Dispute Again Asks For Dismissal

    A contractor asked a Northern California federal court judge on Thursday to dismiss an amended complaint by the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians that claims a dispute over an unfinished casino project belongs in tribal court and that the tribe maintains sovereign immunity.

  • September 23, 2022

    Jury Frees Delta, Drunk Passenger From Groping Suit

    A federal jury in Pittsburgh on Friday cleared Delta Air Lines of liability for an intoxicated passenger who boarded a flight and allegedly groped a federal officer.

  • September 23, 2022

    Boy Scouts Appeals Roll In, Alex Jones Ch. 11 Attys Nixed

    More than a dozen insurers commenced appeals of the Boy Scouts of America's confirmed Chapter 11 plan, proposed attorneys and advisers in an Alex Jones-linked bankruptcy were disqualified, and talc injury claimants questioned the good faith of Johnson & Johnson's talc unit in filing for bankruptcy. This is the week in bankruptcy.

  • September 23, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen investors in a Disney film financing scheme look for a fairytale ending against HSBC, a scuppered Forex company sue a card payments provider in a breach of contract claim, and Boots Opticians eye up a commercial contracts claim against NHS England. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • September 22, 2022

    Resort Group Lands $2.26B Valuation With GIC Partnership

    Luxury beach resort group Sani/Ikos and Singaporean sovereign wealth fund GIC announced Thursday that they would enter into a strategic partnership in which GIC will become Sani/Ikos' leading shareholder.

  • September 22, 2022

    Food Franchises Sue Gig Economy App Over 2020 Tax Credits

    Online gig economy platform ShiftPixy has been sued in California federal court by 16 fast-casual food franchise owners and operators that claim the all-in-one workforce manager owes them $2.3 million of employee retention credits for the 2020 tax year.

  • September 22, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Black Lion, ICO Group, WTI Capital

    Black Lion has reportedly paid $6.4 million for a Miami retail space, ICO Group is reportedly hoping to get $69.8 million with the sale of a shuttered Los Angeles hotel, and WTI Capital is said to have scored $54.8 million in financing for a Florida multifamily property.

  • September 22, 2022

    Trump Fraud Referrals Present Political Minefield For DOJ, IRS

    The New York attorney general's criminal referrals to the U.S. Department of Justice and the IRS stemming from her probe of former President Donald Trump will force prosecutors to walk a political tightrope, given Trump's accusations of bias and Republicans' animus toward the IRS.

  • September 22, 2022

    Marriott Robocall Claims Against Timeshare Co. Largely Axed

    A Virginia federal judge tossed several of Marriott International Inc.'s claims against timeshare company ResortCom, which was accused of being part of a robocall scheme, ruling that the hotel giant had failed to plausibly allege that ResortCom knew that the companies it worked with were infringing on Marriott's trademark.

  • September 22, 2022

    Events Company Abruptly Quit Paying Workers, Suit Alleges

    A Nevada-based events company suddenly stopped paying its New York employees and laid off one worker after she made repeated inquiries about her paycheck, according to a proposed class action filed Thursday.

  • September 22, 2022

    NYC Defends Fast-Food Just Cause Law At 2nd Circ.

    A law making it tougher for New York City fast-food restaurants to fire workers neither encroaches on federal labor law nor unfairly boosts local businesses over national chains, the city told the Second Circuit, urging the court to reject an industry challenge.

  • September 21, 2022

    Meet The Lawyers On Deck In NY V. Trump Biz Fraud Case

    The New York attorney general's blockbuster fraud suit against former President Donald Trump, three of his adult children and the Trump organization will pit some of the family's fiercest defenders against a team of seasoned prosecutors.

  • September 21, 2022

    MGM Has Been Skimming Millions In Change, Class Suit Says

    MGM Resorts has been effectively stealing from slot machine players at its casinos across the country by pocketing their leftover change, according to a lawsuit filed on Wednesday in Mississippi federal court.

  • September 21, 2022

    BIA Docs Show Gov't Axed Campground Lease, Blackfeet Say

    Internal records from the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs prove that, in 2008, the agency canceled a private campground's lease on Blackfeet Indian Nation land, the tribe said Wednesday, urging a Montana federal judge to toss litigation in which the camp operator is challenging its removal.

  • September 21, 2022

    Wyndham Resists Licensee's Bid To Exit Sex Trafficking Row

    Wyndham Hotels has asked a New Jersey federal judge to deny a Philadelphia-based Days Inn licensee's attempt to escape a Wyndham lawsuit seeking $2 million to pay for cases involving sex trafficking at the licensee's hotels, saying their contract allows for litigation and payment of legal costs.

  • September 21, 2022

    Insurers Wrongly Denied COVID Claim, Del. Justices Told

    An attorney for a multi-state water park venture told Delaware's Supreme Court on Wednesday that a lower court wrongly tossed its challenge to an insurer's rejection of COVID-19 business loss coverage based on an "overly interpreted and expanded" policy exclusion covering pollutants.

  • September 21, 2022

    Bankrupt Restaurant's COVID-19 Coverage Suit Tossed

    A California federal judge has rejected bankrupt restaurant chain Garden Fresh's claims that its insurance covers losses caused by government-ordered COVID-19 shutdowns, saying it is making arguments that have been tried and rejected in numerous prior cases.

Expert Analysis

  • AML Regulation Of Lawyers Is Imminent And Controversial

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    The U.S. House of Representatives' recently passed National Defense Authorization Act subjects lawyers engaged in certain financial-related activities to anti-money laundering regulation under the Bank Secrecy Act, which could pit lawyers against clients in ways harmful to the rule of law and administration of justice, says Jeremy Glicksman at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office in New York.

  • Key Adaptations For Law Firms Amid Quiet Quitting Movement

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    While quiet quitting may not be sustainable at law firms with billable hour requirements, there are specific steps law firms should take to maintain engagement and otherwise respond to the trend's underlying message that associates won't spend all their waking hours at work if they don't feel it's worthwhile, says Meredith Kahan at Whiteford Taylor.

  • Opinion

    Section 230 Shouldn't Protect Big Tech On Casino Apps

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    In its recent decision to trim claims in the multidistrict litigation alleging Apple, Google and Meta illegally distribute gambling apps, a California federal court should have held that Section 230 immunity does not apply at all because the companies' conduct goes far beyond just providing a platform to promote and sell apps, says Raphael Janove at Pollock Cohen.

  • Creating A Hybrid Work Policy? Be Intentional And Inclusive

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    The pandemic has changed expectations for the future of work forever, and as more employees demand hybrid working options, law firms must develop policies and models that are intentional, inclusive and iterative to lead the industry into the future, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • A Law Firm's Guide To Humane Layoffs As Recession Looms

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    Amid warnings of a global recession, law firms should prepare for the possibility of associate layoffs, aiming for an empathetic approach and avoiding common mistakes that make the emotional impact on departing attorneys worse, say Jarrett Green, a wellness consultant, and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Consider Liability Before Accessing Workers' Personal Emails

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    A Georgia state appeals court's ruling in Patel v. Duke Hospitality around monitoring employee computer and email use demonstrates that employers must establish airtight legal justification, backed by company policies and employee consent, before initiating digital investigations that may lead to access of personal employee accounts, says Benjamin Fink at Berman Fink.

  • Learning From Trump And Bannon Discovery Strategies

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    Court-imposed sanctions on both former President Donald Trump and his former aide Steve Bannon for failing to comply with subpoenas illustrate that efforts to bar the door to valid discovery can quickly escalate, so litigants faced with challenging discovery disputes should adopt a pragmatic approach, say Mathea Bulander and Monica McCarroll at Redgrave.

  • The Risks In Lateral Hiring, And How To Avoid Them

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    As law firms increasingly recruit laterals, they must account for ethics rules and other due diligence issues that can turn an inadvisable or careless hire into a nightmare of lost opportunity or disqualification, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • Reading FARA Tea Leaves In Flynn Ex-Partner, Wynn Cases

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    The recent Foreign Agents Registration Act cases against Michael Flynn’s ex-business partner Bijan Rafiekian and casino mogul Steve Wynn show that the U.S. Department of Justice may test the statute's boundaries as it ramps up enforcement of foreign influence campaigns, say Richard Sofield and Peter Thomas at V&E.

  • Key Takeaways From Calif.'s Sweeping Fast-Food Wage Law

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    California Gov. Gavin Newsom recently signed a controversial wage bill that will have a major impact on fast-food employers and employees, will likely shape how the state regulates other industries in the future, and represents a radical step toward sectoral bargaining, says Pooja Nair at Ervin Cohen.

  • Judges Who Use Social Media Must Know Their Ethical Limits

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    While the judiciary is permitted to use electronic social media, judges and judicial candidates should protect themselves from accusations of ethics violations by studying the growing body of ethics opinions and disciplinary cases centering on who judges connect with and how they behave online, says Justice Daniel Crothers at the North Dakota Supreme Court.

  • Rebuttal

    Courts Are Not Shifting On COVID Biz Interruption Stance

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    Although a recent Law360 guest article suggested that the pendulum is about to swing in favor of policyholders seeking business interruption coverage for pandemic-related losses, the larger body of appellate case law — applying the laws of 25 states — continues to find no coverage, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • Rebuttal

    ABA Is Defending Profession's Values From Monied Influences

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    A recent Law360 guest article suggested that the American Bar Association ignored new opportunities for the legal industry by opposing nonlawyer ownership of law practices, but any advantages would be outweighed by the constraints nonlawyer owners could place on the independence that lawyers require to act in the best interest of their clients, says Stephen Younger at Foley Hoag.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Better Manage Litigation Exposure

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    In anticipation of economic downturn and increased litigation volume, the true struggle for an in-house team is allocating their very limited and valuable attentional resources, but the solution is building systems that focus attention where it can be most effective in delivering better outcomes, say Jaron Luttich and Sean Kennedy at Element Standard.

  • Practical E-Discovery Lessons From The Alex Jones Case

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    The accidental disclosure of mobile phone data during the Alex Jones defamation damages trial underlines the importance of having in place a repeatable e-discovery process that includes specific steps to prevent production of data that may be privileged, sensitive or damaging to the case, say Mike Gaudet and Richard Chung at J.S. Held.

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