New Jersey

  • October 04, 2022

    Attorney Challenges Complaint Of Fraudulent Loan Deal

    The lawyer for a purported investment company says a bottling startup can't support its claims that he induced it to enter into a $55.3 million loan agreement with his client that allegedly cost it a $2.7 million deposit.

  • October 04, 2022

    High Court Allows Longer Arguments In ICWA Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear extended oral arguments next month in a case concerning the federal rules around fostering and adopting Native American children, granting a request in which the government said the closely watched litigation involves "numerous issues of constitutional law."

  • October 04, 2022

    J&J Mesh Ruling Misread NC Law, 3rd Circ. Is Told

    The Third Circuit's "convoluted and incomprehensible reasoning" for affirming the toss of a man's hernia mesh injury suit against Johnson & Johnson and its medical device subsidiary Ethicon Inc. needs another look, according to a rehearing petition filed Monday.

  • October 04, 2022

    Week After Januvia Patent Is Upheld, Merck Sues Over Generic

    Merck has launched a suit claiming a New Jersey-based pharmaceutical company's proposed generic of the blockbuster diabetes drug Januvia infringes its patent on the treatment, less than a week after the Federal Circuit backed a Patent Trial and Appeal Board decision upholding the patent.

  • October 04, 2022

    NJ Supreme Court Names New Director Of Attorney Ethics

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Tuesday named the chief counsel of its Disciplinary Review Board as the new director of the state's Office of Attorney Ethics, less than two weeks after the former director was ousted amid allegations of an unreported "intimate relationship" with a staffer.

  • October 04, 2022

    CFPB Fines Remittance Biz $950K Over Compliance Slips

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Tuesday levied a $950,000 fine against a New Jersey-based money transfer service for allegedly failing to disclose important prepayment information to consumers sending remittances and for having deficient record-keeping practices, among other things.

  • October 04, 2022

    Insurer Aims To Duck Coverage For Law Firm Malpractice Suit

    A subsidiary of The Hanover Insurance Group Inc. has urged a New Jersey federal court to throw out a lawsuit from law firm Baron & Brennan PC seeking coverage for a malpractice action, saying coverage is not available because the underlying suit was filed at the wrong time.

  • October 04, 2022

    NJ Law Firm Accused Of Malpractice Over 'Judge Shopping'

    Epstein Becker Green and its former managing director have been hit with a malpractice action in New Jersey state court from an ex-client alleging that "judge shopping" in part drove a state appellate panel to order a new damages trial in a suit against him.

  • October 04, 2022

    Novo Nordisk's Transfer Denial Constitutes Bias, EEOC Says

    Novo Nordisk's refusal to transfer a worker impacted her employment enough to justify a lawsuit, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said in urging a New Jersey federal judge not to throw out an age bias case against the Danish pharmaceutical company.

  • October 03, 2022

    Rutgers, Union Off Hook Over Prof's Grievances, Court Says

    Neither Rutgers University nor the union that represents its faculty committed unfair labor practices when they indefinitely delayed arbitration of a dentistry professor's claims he was denied sufficient holiday time off, a New Jersey appeals court found Monday.

  • October 03, 2022

    J&J Seeks To Erase Talc Fraud Class Claims As Too Late

    Johnson & Johnson has told a New Jersey federal court that the sons of a deceased factory worker are too late in bringing class claims alleging the pharmaceutical giant falsely represented to courts and personal injury litigants that there was no evidence of its industrial talc containing asbestos.

  • October 03, 2022

    NJ Panel Rejects Challenge To Affordable Housing Zoning

    A New Jersey state appeals court on Monday upheld Hopewell Township's decision to rezone 213 acres for a mixed-use development that includes court-mandated affordable housing, even though the rezoning conflicts with the township's master plan.

  • October 03, 2022

    NJ Assembly Passes Ban On Nondisparagement Clauses

    A New Jersey Assembly Democrats' bill to block employment-related settlement agreements from stipulating that the parties cannot disparage each other passed overwhelmingly on Monday, with only nine of the Assembly's 80 legislators voting against it.

  • October 03, 2022

    NJ Atty Sued By Paralegal Claiming Abuse And Discrimination

    Attorney Joseph M. Di Nicola Jr., his father and their firm are being sued in New Jersey federal court by a former paralegal claiming alleged harsh physical and emotional abuse during her time at the firm while reluctantly dating the younger Di Nicola.

  • October 03, 2022

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    What do drones, electric cars, eggs, chocolate and time-wasting have in common? They're all part of the news out of Delaware Chancery Court this week. And that's not even counting all the disputes between Twitter Inc. and Tesla CEO Elon Musk, which are ratcheting up as the Oct. 17 trial over the scuttled $44 billion deal approaches.

  • October 03, 2022

    Citibank Gets NJ Firm's Suit Over Fraudulent Check Tossed

    A New Jersey federal judge has granted Citibank's bid to dismiss a suit filed by Garden State law firm Scura Wigfield Heyer Stevens & Cammarota LLP over an alleged scam that sent nearly $119,000 of the firm's funds to a bogus entity's account.

  • October 03, 2022

    NC Man's J&J Mesh Suit Was Filed Too Late, 3rd Circ. Rules

    The Third Circuit has crushed a consumer's attempt to revive a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson and its Ethicon unit alleging he was injured by a hernia mesh implant, finding the man was years late filing suit under North Carolina's product liability law.

  • September 30, 2022

    3rd Circ. Orders Sentence Redo In $95M Drug Fraud Case

    The Third Circuit on Friday threw out the 2017 money laundering convictions of reverse pharmaceutical company Devos Ltd. and two of its former executives but left intact dozens of other criminal counts, prison terms and fines for a $95 million drug refund theft scheme.

  • September 30, 2022

    The 5 Biggest Cases This Supreme Court Term

    The reversal of constitutional abortion protections last term has court watchers wondering: Is affirmative action next? But the lawsuits against Harvard University and the University of North Carolina are far from the only blockbusters on the docket in what is likely to be another landslide term for conservatives. Here, Law360 breaks down five cases to watch. 

  • September 30, 2022

    NJ Health System Loses Verdict To Recoup $15M Deal Fee

    A New Jersey federal jury determined Friday that Cooper Health System could not recoup a $15 million deposit it paid before terminating its proposed acquisition of two hospitals from a Trinity Health subsidiary because it had failed to notify that entity about alleged problems with the deal.

  • September 30, 2022

    SEC Says Duo Illegally Traded On Pilfered Press Releases

    U.S. and Canadian securities authorities on Friday accused two former employees of a corporate press release distribution service of illegally profiting from the unpublished news releases of companies like Tesla Inc. and Autozone Inc.

  • September 30, 2022

    Landowners Seek Cert Again In Unpaid Gas Storage Suit

    A Pennsylvania landowner asked a federal court to again certify a class action against a natural gas producer accused of storing gas below neighbors' properties without payment, less than two months after the Third Circuit scrapped an initial certification.

  • September 30, 2022

    3rd Circ. Preview: Home Depot MDL Row, Secret Service Spat

    The Third Circuit's October argument schedule will be highlighted by Home Depot's fight to keep its drywall antitrust case against a building supply company from being thrown into an existing multidistrict litigation proceeding.

  • September 30, 2022

    Fed. Circ. Lets IP Row Stay In Texas, Citing Remote Workers

    In a split ruling, the Federal Circuit on Friday affirmed U.S. District Judge Alan Albright's decision to keep a patent lawsuit against a chip company in his Waco courtroom, based on the presence of four remotely working employees who live in Texas.

  • September 30, 2022

    Law360's The Term: A New Normal For The Supreme Court?

    As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares for the 2022-2023 term with a slate of new blockbuster cases, the fallout from last term's Dobbs decision and its leaked draft is still reverberating. And while pandemic-era restrictions at the court are loosening, the hosts discuss with veteran court reporter Amy Howe what kind of "new normal" to expect at the high court.

Expert Analysis

  • The Lawyer Personalities That Make Up Joint Interest Groups

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    As multiparty litigation rises and forces competing law firms to work together, George Reede at Zelle looks at the different personalities — from tactful synthesizers to misguided Don Quixotes — that often make up joint representation groups, and how lawyers can overcome the tensions in these and other team settings.

  • Employer Haziness Lingers After NJ's Cannabis Guidance

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    New Jersey’s recently released guidance on screening workers for cannabis neglects to answer several key questions, from training for employee experts to scientific standards for impairment tests, but employers can still take certain steps toward compliance, says Eric Meyer at FisherBroyles.

  • Attys Shouldn't Assume Judicial Critique Is Protected Speech

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    As it becomes more commonplace to see criticism of the judiciary in the media, licensed attorneys are well advised to remember that they may have less freedom than nonlawyers to make protected speech critical of the judiciary, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • NJ High Court Ruling Doesn't Negate Insurer Duty To Defend

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court's decision in Norman v. Admiral Insurance, finding a narrow exception to the duty to defend, doesn't allow insurers to skip out on their litigation defense obligations, say Eric Jesse and Seth Fiur at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    Keys To A 9-0 High Court Win: Practicality Over Perfection

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    When I argued for the petitioner in Wooden v. U.S. last year, I discovered that preparation is key, but so is the right kind of preparation — in giving decisive answers to the U.S. Supreme Court justices' hypothetical questions I was not aiming for perfection, just the best response available, says Allon Kedem at Arnold & Porter.

  • What New Bar Exam Means For Law Students And Schools

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    Stephanie Acosta at UWorld discusses how law students and law schools can start preparing now for the new bar exam launching in 2026, which is expected to emphasize real-world lawyering skills-based tasks over rote memorization.

  • Apple's New Messaging Features Will Complicate E-Discovery

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    Apple's newest mobile operating system allows users to edit and recall messages and recover deleted messages, which could significantly increase the time, burden and expense of processing and analyzing cellphones if messages or their associated metadata become an area of scrutiny in a case, says Jarrett Coco at Nelson Mullins.

  • Noncompete Enforceability In The World Of Remote Work

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    A Connecticut federal court’s recent decision in Onward Search v. Noble — holding that a noncompete agreement that included an employee’s remote home office was too geographically broad — is instructive for protecting noncompete clauses with remote workers in other states, including New Jersey, New York and Texas, say attorneys at Archer Law.

  • Law Firm Inclusion Efforts Often Overlook Business Staff

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    Law firms committed to a culture of universal inclusion can take steps to foster a sense of belonging in their business services teams, says Jennifer Johnson at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Considerations For Interstate Travel For Abortion Post-Dobbs

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Due to the patchwork of state laws regarding the legality of abortion following the U.S. Supreme Court's Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization decision, it's important to consider the state of current and potential laws about traveling for abortion services, say Virginia Bell Flynn and Tina Safi Felahi at Troutman Pepper.

  • An Associate's Guide To Rebounding After A Layoff

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    Law firm associates laid off due to economic conditions can recuperate and move forward by practicing self-care, identifying key skills to leverage during the job search, engaging in self-reflection and more, say Kate Sheikh at Major Lindsey and wellness consultant Jarrett Green.

  • AML Regulation Of Lawyers Is Imminent And Controversial

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    The U.S. House of Representatives' recently passed National Defense Authorization Act subjects lawyers engaged in certain financial-related activities to anti-money laundering regulation under the Bank Secrecy Act, which could pit lawyers against clients in ways harmful to the rule of law and administration of justice, says Jeremy Glicksman at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office in New York.

  • Worker Misclassification Poses Large Perils For NJ Cos.

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    Considering the New Jersey Legislature’s and governor’s recent focus on worker misclassification — as well as the state supreme court’s recent interpretation of the so-called ABC test — the dangers of noncompliance for businesses that use independent contractors cannot be understated, say Brent Bouma and Peter Shapiro at Lewis Brisbois.

  • 3rd Circ. Decision Highlights Enviro Law Notice Requirements

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    The Third Circuit's recent dismissal of Shark River Cleanup Coalition v. Township of Wall is a reminder of an important but often overlooked aspect of citizen suits brought under environmental laws like the Clean Water Act: Plaintiffs' failure to comply with statutory notice requirements can have significant consequences, says Charles Dennen at Archer.

  • Key Adaptations For Law Firms Amid Quiet Quitting Movement

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    While quiet quitting may not be sustainable at law firms with billable hour requirements, there are specific steps law firms should take to maintain engagement and otherwise respond to the trend's underlying message that associates won't spend all their waking hours at work if they don't feel it's worthwhile, says Meredith Kahan at Whiteford Taylor.

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