Massachusetts

  • September 26, 2022

    Biogen Finalizes $900M Deal To End Feds' Kickback Claims

    A Massachusetts federal judge gave the final green light Monday to a deal that will see Biogen Inc. pay $900 million to settle decade-old claims with the federal government, as well as several states, that the company paid illegal kickbacks to doctors and other health care professionals.

  • September 26, 2022

    Delta Exec Ordered To Testify At Rivals' Antitrust Trial

    Federal prosecutors can enforce a subpoena to compel a Delta Air Lines executive to testify at a bench trial set to start this week in a suit that alleges a partnership between two rival airlines is quashing competition in the transportation industry.

  • September 26, 2022

    Mass. Transit Agencies Sued Over Cyclist's Death By Train

    The estate of a man killed while riding his bike at a Massachusetts commuter train station filed a wrongful death suit Monday against multiple Greater Boston transit agencies, claiming unsafe conditions at a pedestrian crosswalk have led to numerous deaths dating back at least a decade.

  • September 26, 2022

    Asset Manager Wrongly Nixed Long-COVID Benefits, Suit Says

    A Massachusetts investment management employee who contracted COVID-19 and suffered debilitating long-term symptoms for more than a year is seeking back pay after his disability payments were canceled during his recovery, according to a federal complaint.

  • September 26, 2022

    Microcap Co. Exec Settles SEC Fraud Suit After Guilty Plea

    The former chief executive of an Ohio company has settled claims by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that he fraudulently skirted stock restrictions, following his guilty plea in related criminal charges that resulted in a two-year prison sentence.

  • September 26, 2022

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    The First State's court of equity took on a lot last week, roundly rejecting a shareholder's settlement, putting a deal for a cellphone tower builder on hold, highlighting a gap in a board's accountability for sexual harassment, and denying a famous billionaire a do-over in discovery. Get ready for the week ahead by catching up on what you missed in your weekly wrap-up of news from the Delaware Chancery Court.

  • September 23, 2022

    Celtics Used Law Firm To Investigate Suspended Coach

    A confidential report by a respected law firm the Boston Celtics hired this summer to investigate head coach Ime Udoka's workplace conduct convinced the team to suspend Udoka for the upcoming season and left his future with the organization in limbo, team executives said Friday.

  • September 23, 2022

    Judge Cuts Some Of Atum's Claims In Gene Therapy IP Row

    A Massachusetts federal judge has trimmed biotechnology company Atum's fraud and mismanagement counterclaims in rival SalioGen's trade secrets suit against it over genomics technology, but allowed Atum's arguments over the ownership of those trade secrets to proceed since a substantial controversy exists.

  • September 23, 2022

    DOJ Swerve On Mass. Judge Indictment Leaves Attys Queasy

    The sudden dismissal of criminal charges against a Massachusetts judge who allegedly helped an undocumented immigrant evade federal agents left some attorneys fearing that politics played an outsized role in the controversial case from start to finish.

  • September 23, 2022

    Fla. Senator Sues DeSantis Over $1.5M Paid To Fly Migrants

    Democratic Florida state Sen. Jason Pizzo has sued GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis and administration officials over the constitutionality of using $1.5 million of COVID-19 relief funds to fly migrants from near Texas' southern border to Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts, accusing officials of spending taxpayer money on such programs before certain requirements were met.

  • September 23, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Dads Say Recent Ruling Bolsters Their Appeal

    A pair of parents convicted in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal on Friday pointed the First Circuit to a ruling by a different judge involved in the high-profile case as proof that prosecutors relied on an invalid legal theory during their trial.

  • September 23, 2022

    Former EBay Exec Seeks House Arrest For Stalking Plea

    The last of seven former eBay workers to cop to cyberstalking charges for harassing a pair of e-commerce bloggers argued Friday for a no-prison sentence, saying his role in the scheme was limited to two days of surveillance.

  • September 23, 2022

    2 Men Plead Guilty In Alleged $30M Forex Fraud Scheme

    Two men pled guilty Friday to conspiracy charges for allegedly coaxing investors into giving them money for foreign exchange trades, then fabricating large trading losses and laundering $30 million in proceeds around the globe.

  • September 23, 2022

    PE Giant Advent Hires Ropes & Gray Atty For Top Legal Spot

    Private equity firm Advent International Corp. has named Ropes & Gray partner Amanda McGrady Morrison as managing director, a job in which she will assume the responsibilities of general counsel and chief legal officer, the firm said Thursday.

  • September 22, 2022

    Breaking Down The DOJ's American-JetBlue Antitrust Trial

    American Airlines and JetBlue's highly anticipated showdown with the Biden administration in an upcoming antitrust trial stands to affect how intensely competition enforcers scrutinize future airline combinations, code-share agreements and joint ventures. Here, Law360 takes a closer look at the case.

  • September 22, 2022

    Sen. Judiciary Advances Journalism Competition Bill With Fix

    The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to advance a bill that would allow certain journalism outlets to collectively negotiate with major tech companies over payment for their content after adopting an amendment barring content moderation issues from the talks.

  • September 22, 2022

    HarbourVest Partners Secures $3B For Its 12th Fund

    Global private markets firm HarbourVest Partners announced on Thursday that it has closed its 12th flagship fund at $3 billion, well over its target of $2 billion.

  • September 22, 2022

    Biopharma Co. Blasts 'Excessive' Fee Bid In Board Pay Case

    After striking a tentative deal to settle a Delaware Chancery suit he filed over alleged "grossly excessive" director pay, an investor plaintiff is now seeking an "excessive" payday for his attorneys, Sage Therapeutics Inc. has told the court.

  • September 22, 2022

    Feds Drop Obstruction Case Against Mass. Judge

    Federal prosecutors on Thursday agreed to dismiss a politically charged criminal case against a Massachusetts state court judge accused of allowing an undocumented immigrant to evade custody when agents showed up to arrest him in the judge's courtroom.

  • September 21, 2022

    Energy Dept. Will Conduct Efficiency Reviews To Settle Suit

    The U.S. Department of Energy will review energy efficiency standards for consumer and commercial products as early as next year to settle litigation from environmental advocacy groups and 17 states alleging the agency dodged its responsibilities to evaluate dozens of products.

  • September 21, 2022

    Manchin Unveils Permitting Reform To Reluctant Congress

    Sen. Joe Manchin on Wednesday released his plan for legislation that would ease the permitting process for infrastructure projects like oil and gas pipelines and electricity transmission lines, but it faces an uncertain future in the divided Congress.

  • September 21, 2022

    Mass Tort Cases Expose Bankruptcy Courts To New Threats

    A New Jersey bankruptcy judge recently revealed that he and his staff have been receiving threats and harassment relating to a talc mass tort case, laying bare how exposed bankruptcy courts are as they are called upon to address societal ills instead of mere financial distress, experts say.

  • September 21, 2022

    TA Announces $1.1 Billion Close of Fifth Debt Fund

    Private equity firm TA Associates announced Wednesday that it had completed fundraising for its latest debt fund with total commitments of $1.1 billion, and plans to use the capital to invest in the debt of the firm's own portfolio companies.

  • September 21, 2022

    1st Circ. Pick Vows To Apply Dobbs 'Faithfully'

    A veteran abortion-rights attorney nominated to the First Circuit vowed to apply the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Dobbs decision "faithfully" and pledged that she would separate her past advocacy from rulings on the bench during a Senate hearing Wednesday.

  • September 21, 2022

    1st Circ. Declines To Review Pot Interstate Commerce Ruling

    The full First Circuit on Wednesday declined to review a split panel decision that found the dormant commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution applies to the federally illegal medical marijuana industry.

Expert Analysis

  • Considerations For Interstate Travel For Abortion Post-Dobbs

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    Due to the patchwork of state laws regarding the legality of abortion following the U.S. Supreme Court's Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization decision, it's important to consider the state of current and potential laws about traveling for abortion services, say Virginia Bell Flynn and Tina Safi Felahi at Troutman Pepper.

  • Antitrust Suit Could Shake Up Schools' Financial Aid Policies

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    The eventual outcome of Henry v. Brown University, a civil antitrust suit brought against a group of elite private universities, could have major ramifications for how some of the most prestigious institutions of higher education in the U.S. allocate and award financial aid, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • An Associate's Guide To Rebounding After A Layoff

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    Law firm associates laid off due to economic conditions can recuperate and move forward by practicing self-care, identifying key skills to leverage during the job search, engaging in self-reflection and more, say Kate Sheikh at Major Lindsey and wellness consultant Jarrett Green.

  • AML Regulation Of Lawyers Is Imminent And Controversial

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    The U.S. House of Representatives' recently passed National Defense Authorization Act subjects lawyers engaged in certain financial-related activities to anti-money laundering regulation under the Bank Secrecy Act, which could pit lawyers against clients in ways harmful to the rule of law and administration of justice, says Jeremy Glicksman at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office in New York.

  • Key Adaptations For Law Firms Amid Quiet Quitting Movement

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    While quiet quitting may not be sustainable at law firms with billable hour requirements, there are specific steps law firms should take to maintain engagement and otherwise respond to the trend's underlying message that associates won't spend all their waking hours at work if they don't feel it's worthwhile, says Meredith Kahan at Whiteford Taylor.

  • Creating A Hybrid Work Policy? Be Intentional And Inclusive

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    The pandemic has changed expectations for the future of work forever, and as more employees demand hybrid working options, law firms must develop policies and models that are intentional, inclusive and iterative to lead the industry into the future, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • A Law Firm's Guide To Humane Layoffs As Recession Looms

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    Amid warnings of a global recession, law firms should prepare for the possibility of associate layoffs, aiming for an empathetic approach and avoiding common mistakes that make the emotional impact on departing attorneys worse, say Jarrett Green, a wellness consultant, and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Puerto Rico Bankruptcy Ruling Spells Takings Inconsistency

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    The First Circuit’s ruling in the Puerto Rico restructuring case that takings claims cannot be impaired in bankruptcy establishes inconsistent treatment of takings claims among appellate courts and raises an important constitutional question, which could lead the matter to the U.S. Supreme Court, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Learning From Trump And Bannon Discovery Strategies

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    Court-imposed sanctions on both former President Donald Trump and his former aide Steve Bannon for failing to comply with subpoenas illustrate that efforts to bar the door to valid discovery can quickly escalate, so litigants faced with challenging discovery disputes should adopt a pragmatic approach, say Mathea Bulander and Monica McCarroll at Redgrave.

  • Dropped FCPA Case Holds Key Reminder For Defense Attys

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent decision, based on newly discovered evidence, to drop Foreign Corrupt Practices Act charges against two defendants involved in a Haitian port development project underscores the need for defense counsel to hold the DOJ to its own policies and precedents in all types of criminal cases, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • The Risks In Lateral Hiring, And How To Avoid Them

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    As law firms increasingly recruit laterals, they must account for ethics rules and other due diligence issues that can turn an inadvisable or careless hire into a nightmare of lost opportunity or disqualification, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • How Inflation Reduction Act Will Lift Offshore Wind Projects

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    The Inflation Reduction Act should promote the development of offshore wind energy in multiple ways — including by improving the planning and permitting process for transmission infrastructure, expanding potential lease areas and making beneficial changes to the tax credits available for renewable energy developers, say attorneys at Day Pitney.

  • Judges Who Use Social Media Must Know Their Ethical Limits

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    While the judiciary is permitted to use electronic social media, judges and judicial candidates should protect themselves from accusations of ethics violations by studying the growing body of ethics opinions and disciplinary cases centering on who judges connect with and how they behave online, says Justice Daniel Crothers at the North Dakota Supreme Court.

  • Rebuttal

    ABA Is Defending Profession's Values From Monied Influences

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    A recent Law360 guest article suggested that the American Bar Association ignored new opportunities for the legal industry by opposing nonlawyer ownership of law practices, but any advantages would be outweighed by the constraints nonlawyer owners could place on the independence that lawyers require to act in the best interest of their clients, says Stephen Younger at Foley Hoag.

  • Where States Stand On The Legality Of Abortion

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    In light of Indiana recently joining 19 other states in criminalizing abortion prior to viability, Amanda Zablocki and Mikela Sutrina at Sheppard Mullin review the current slate of state abortion laws and their broader implications.

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