Massachusetts

  • September 14, 2022

    White House Details $2B Biotech Supply Chain Initiative

    The White House's recently announced drive to advance U.S. biotechnology and biomanufacturing will cost more than $2 billion, the Biden administration said on Wednesday.

  • September 14, 2022

    Sanofi Puerto Rico Unit Excused From Insulin Antitrust Case

    A Puerto Rico subsidiary of Sanofi-Aventis cannot be held liable for any alleged antitrust violations by its parent company in a suit accusing the pharmaceutical giant of improperly listing patents for the injector pen of lucrative diabetes drug Lantus, a Boston federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • September 14, 2022

    Senate Confirms Rhode Island Public Defender To 1st Circ.

    The Senate voted Wednesday to confirm Lara E. Montecalvo, the public defender of Rhode Island, to the First Circuit.

  • September 14, 2022

    Sports Site Latest To Be Sued For Routing Data To Facebook

    A Texas-based sports streaming company joined the ranks of Paramount, Discovery Communications, Bloomberg News and other media giants Tuesday as it was hit with a proposed class action claiming it illegally funneled user information to Facebook through a snippet of computer code.

  • September 13, 2022

    Mass. Residents Say Mashpee Can't Have Casino Trust Land

    Some Massachusetts residents maintain that the federal government illegally acquired land in their city for a Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe casino development, slamming the U.S. Department of the Interior for an "unprecedented manipulation" of its 2014 legal record detailing that authority.

  • September 13, 2022

    1st Circ. Won't Ax $5.5M Notre Dame Construction Award

    The First Circuit on Tuesday upheld a $5.5 million arbitration judgment awarded to the University of Notre Dame over the objections of two developers regarding a botched student housing project, with a panel rejecting a claim that the deadline for confirming the award had passed.

  • September 13, 2022

    Raytheon Wants Out Of Rod End Bearing Design Suit

    Raytheon Technologies Corp. asked a Massachusetts federal judge on Monday to rule in its favor in a lawsuit that claimed it unlawfully used and shared another manufacturer's rod end bearing design because the design was shared with Raytheon "without restriction" and is full of features that are common knowledge rather than trade secrets.  

  • September 13, 2022

    Mass. Athletics Body Told To Seek Deal With Remote Students

    A Boston federal judge Tuesday aimed to sidestep an injunction bid challenging a Massachusetts athletics body's decision to bar some remote students from playing on their local school's sports teams, ordering the parties to seek a deal to let the students play while the case plays out.

  • September 13, 2022

    1st Circ. Doubts Hasbro's $1.9M Fee Bid In Game Of Life Suit

    The First Circuit did not appear receptive to claims by toymaker Hasbro that the heirs of a toy developer who brought an unsuccessful suit for royalty fees tied to the Game of Life board game now owe the company $1.9 million in attorney fees.

  • September 13, 2022

    Fishery Monitor Cost Similar To Nets, 1st Circ. Says

    The First Circuit on Tuesday appeared receptive to a rule requiring fishermen to pay for a new federal monitoring program to ensure compliance with federal fishing standards, likening it to covering the cost of their own nets.

  • September 13, 2022

    Gorton's Frozen Fish Labeling Suit Nears Settlement

    Seafood maker Gorton's Inc. said Monday it is close to settling a proposed class action alleging it falsely labels its tilapia as "sustainably sourced."

  • September 12, 2022

    Korean Co. Can't Be First To Invent CRISPR, PTAB Told

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board is again considering who was first to invent the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology, this time hearing arguments Monday from Korean biotechnology company ToolGen Inc. that it was first to use the technology in plants and animals.

  • September 12, 2022

    Apparel Maker Says IP Lawsuit Threats Are From Patent Troll

    The Life Is Good Co., an apparel and accessories brand, accused a Texas company on Monday of threatening to assert bogus infringement claims over search engine technology.

  • September 12, 2022

    Third Point Walks Back Request For Disney To Spin Off ESPN

    Activist investor Third Point LLC is hitting the brakes on a plan to try to get The Walt Disney Co. to separate ESPN into a stand-alone entity, after the CEO of Disney reportedly said the company had been "deluged" with interest from companies that want to buy the sports network.

  • September 12, 2022

    Airline Workers May Abuse Mass. Sick Leave Law, Court Told

    A consortium of U.S. airlines opened a federal bench trial Monday in a case challenging Massachusetts' sick leave law by arguing it would open the floodgates to the type of illegitimate sick days that the carriers struggle to manage on the day after the Super Bowl.

  • September 12, 2022

    Mass. High Court Orders Judge To Expunge Man's Pot Arrests

    Massachusetts' highest court has found that a Boston judge abused his discretion when declaring that it wasn't "in the best interests of justice" to expunge a man's marijuana convictions, noting that the amounts he was caught with have since been decriminalized.

  • September 12, 2022

    GE Eyes Early 2023 Health Care Spinoff, Unveils New Board

    General Electric said Monday that it plans to complete its previously announced health care spinoff in the first week of January, and named a roster of board directors that includes Honeywell's general counsel as well as former Amazon, T. Rowe Price and HP executives.

  • September 09, 2022

    Dems Press Zuckerberg On Meta Effort To Halt Crypto Scams

    Prominent Democratic senators are calling on Meta to explain what it is doing to prevent cryptocurrency-related scams on its various social media platforms, citing concerns that the technology giant is providing a "breeding ground" for fraud.

  • September 09, 2022

    What Psychedelic Lawyers Can Learn From Pot Legalization

    The burgeoning field of psychedelic law can take some pointers from cannabis legalization in the U.S., but it should also heed many warnings, experts said at a recent all-day virtual symposium hosted by the Psychedelic Bar Association.

  • September 09, 2022

    Sabra Can't Call Hummus 'Kosher,' Jewish Group Claims

    A Massachusetts-based Jewish group hit Sabra with a federal suit on Friday, claiming that the food products company continues to label its hummus as "kosher" despite using ingredients outside the parameters of the traditional Jewish diet.

  • September 09, 2022

    Tribal Bribery Verdict Hinges On 1st Circ. Cases, Judge Says

    Post-trial acquittal bids filed by a former tribal chairman and an architect convicted on bribery and extortion charges will boil down to which of two First Circuit cases applies in the case, a Boston federal judge said Friday.

  • September 09, 2022

    Civil Rights Orgs Seek FTC Challenge To Amazon-iRobot Deal

    More than two-dozen civil rights groups want the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to challenge Amazon's acquisition of iRobot, warning Friday that the deal will give the tech giant "big-brother-like" access to the most "extremely intimate" acts that take place in people's homes.

  • September 09, 2022

    Biden Admin OK'd For Affirmative Action Args At High Court

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Friday it would allow the Biden administration to participate in oral arguments in a landmark affirmative action case involving Harvard University and the University of North Carolina.

  • September 09, 2022

    John Hancock Unlawfully Raised Insurance Costs, Court Told

    An Irish investment funds manager told a California federal court that an insurer breached its contract by unlawfully increasing the cost of insurance for a targeted group of universal life insurance policyholders.

  • September 08, 2022

    IP Forecast: DC Circ. To Hear Free Speech Challenge To DMCA

    The D.C. Circuit next week will consider a long-simmering constitutional challenge to parts of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that lawyers at the Electronic Frontier Foundation call "a draconian federal statute that directly restricts [the] ability to speak." Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Bar Exam Policies On Menstruation Still Fall Short

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    While many states have taken steps to address long-standing and problematic bar exam policies on menstruation and menstrual products, the changes do not go far enough to remove the continued disadvantages menstruating test takers face, highlighting the need for comprehensive and quick action ahead of this month's exams, say law professors Margaret Johnson, Elizabeth Cooper and Marcy Karin.

  • Keys To Crafting Hybrid Work Policies At Law Firms

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    As law firms embrace hybrid work as a middle ground in a post-pandemic world, work arrangement policies that are built on a foundation of trust and that prioritize lawyers' autonomy over their schedules will give firms an edge in the war for talent, says Alyson Galusha at VOYlegal.

  • Your AI Program Probably Isn't A Person In A Court Of Law

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    Artificial intelligence developers will likely continue to claim AI programs deserve legal rights, after a former Google engineer recently hired a lawyer for AI he worked on, but courts have traditionally been unreceptive to arguments that nonhumans have legal capacity, says Evan Louis Miller at McManis Faulkner.

  • Tips For Handling Audio Data In E-Discovery Post-Pandemic

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    The rise of remote meetings during the COVID-19 pandemic has boosted the volume and importance of audio data in e-discovery — so organizations in highly regulated industries must collect and process that data, and establish complex strategies to manage their audio records, says Jack Bullen at FTI Consulting.

  • Strategies For Effectively Marketing Law Firm ESG Practices

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    As law firms increasingly launch stand-alone environmental, social and corporate governance practices amid rising client demands, they should consider new marketing and client development practices that illuminate their capabilities as well their own sustainability and ethics-related initiatives, says Elle Walch at Ball Janik.

  • The Widening Circuit Split On State Court Climate Claims

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    The U.S. Supreme Court has so far declined the opportunity to resolve a circuit split on whether climate change lawsuits brought under state laws can be removed to federal court, but a recent petition from defendants in Boulder County v. Suncor Energy gives the high court a new opportunity to clarify the issue, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Agreement Among Litigants Key To Using E-Discovery Tech

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    Parties are increasingly using e-discovery technologies to control costs, but as a New York federal court order in Actos Antitrust Litigation shows, a well-drafted, negotiated protocol allows them to address potential objections prior to use and helps protect against later claims of incomplete production, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • Notes On Social Equity From A Former Cannabis Regulator

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    Duane Morris’ Matthew McCarthy, former lead prosecutor in regulatory enforcement actions at the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission, shares observations on the multifaceted efforts by government and the cannabis business community to build a more equitable industry and foster diverse ownership, highlighting the role of data reporting and community outreach.

  • A Former Cannabis Regulator On Shaping A Nascent Industry

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    Matthew McCarthy at Duane Morris shares three insights gleaned from his time as the lead prosecutor in regulatory enforcement actions at the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission, highlighting personnel issues stemming from employees’ prior experience in the illegal market, lessons from Canada, and recommendations for industry self-governance.

  • Opinion

    Law School Admissions Shouldn't Hinge On Test Scores

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    The American Bar Association recently granted law schools some latitude on which tests it can consider in admissions decisions, but its continued emphasis on test scores harms student diversity and is an obstacle to holistic admissions strategies, says Aaron Taylor at AccessLex.

  • High Court Ruling Boosts Defenses In DOJ Health Care Cases

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Ruan v. U.S., establishing a high burden of proof for prosecutions under the Controlled Substances Act, has far-reaching implications that could affect cases involving the Anti-Kickback Statute and Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act, say attorneys at Buchalter.

  • Embracing Revenue Operations For Strong Law Firm Growth

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    The concept of revenue operations — a management strategy commonly used in high-growth sectors that involves integrating all departments to address and fulfill client needs — can help law firms develop their own growth strategies, including strengthening client relationships, says Dave Southern, a business development and marketing professional.

  • Make Room For Serendipity In Your Legal Job Search

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    Landing your dream legal job gets easier when you cultivate serendipity — which involves expanding and deepening your network, while being flexible, authentic and engaged with the world around you, says Anna Sanders at VOYLegal.

  • Ethics Considerations For Attorneys Joining Nonprofit Boards

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Many charitable organizations offer attorneys board positions to benefit from their specialized legal knowledge, but there are ethical considerations and liability dangers that demand lawyers set boundaries about their roles and responsibilities, says Patrick Sturm at LexisNexis.

  • High Court's Opioid Ruling Shows Limits Of CSA's Reach

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Ruan v. U.S., demanding rock-solid proof of intentional impropriety to convict a prescriber under the Controlled Substances Act, provides reassurance to opioid prescribers, but the U.S. Department of Justice is unlikely to back down on CSA prosecutions, say Janelle Pelli and Michelle Peirce at Hinckley Allen.

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