Trials

  • December 03, 2021

    Caltech Sues Samsung After $1B Apple Patent Win

    The California Institute of Technology went to Texas federal court Friday with a new lawsuit that says Samsung's Galaxy smartphones infringe the same patents that a California jury said Apple Inc. and its supplier Broadcom Inc. infringed to the tune of over $1.1 billion in damages.

  • December 03, 2021

    Calif. Denied Early Win In Bench Trial On Board Diversity Law

    A California judge Friday denied the state's motion for judgment on all claims after a group of taxpayers rested its case in a bench trial challenging a law requiring publicly held corporations to place a minimum number of women on their boards.

  • December 03, 2021

    Albright Denies Atty Fees For $13M Winner In Payment IP Trial

    CloudofChange LLC isn't entitled to attorney fees after winning a $13.2 million jury verdict against NCR Corp. for infringement of payment processing patents, U.S. District Judge Alan Albright has ruled.

  • December 03, 2021

    Holmes Attys Rip 'Confusing' Jury Instructions On Fraud

    Counsel for Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes urged a California federal judge Friday to give jurors considering criminal fraud charges against her more detailed explanations of the charges than what prosecutors have proposed.

  • December 03, 2021

    Former Tyson Execs Denied Mistrial On Price-Fixing Charges

    A Colorado federal judge refused to declare a mistrial Friday for two former Tyson Foods executives battling the U.S. Department of Justice over criminal charges of fixing the price of chicken.

  • December 03, 2021

    Matsuo Agrees To Midtrial Capacitor Antitrust Payout Of $5M

    Matsuo Electric Co. Ltd. agreed to pay $5 million midway through a California federal antitrust trial to end claims that it participated in a decadelong global conspiracy to fix capacitor prices, causing direct purchasers to be overcharged by $427 million, the company announced Friday. 

  • December 03, 2021

    Apple Claims Of Epic's Control 'Simply Untrue,' 9th Circ. Told

    App developers seeking to weigh in on Epic Games' Ninth Circuit bid to stop Apple's ban on steering users to alternative payment methods blasted Apple for asserting that the coalition of developers is controlled by the video game company and should not be allowed to file an amicus brief.

  • December 03, 2021

    Boston Cop's Attys Seek $1.3M In Fees After Gender Bias Win

    Todd & Weld LLP lawyers who led a Boston cop to a $2 million jury award for her gender bias claims against the police department want $1.3 million in fees after the city and a police captain put up "every conceivable obstacle" to presenting the case at trial.

  • December 03, 2021

    Convicted Atty Disbarred In NJ Over Mortgage Fraud Scheme

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has yanked the state law license of an attorney over her criminal convictions for taking part in a roughly $873,000 mortgage fraud scheme where a lender provided loans based on her misrepresentations as the buyers' counsel, rejecting her bid for a suspension.

  • December 03, 2021

    Texas Panel Wipes Out Drilling Co.'s $1.6M Jury Win

    A Texas appellate court has undone a jury's $1.6 million award in favor of oil and gas operator Alpha Hunter Drilling LLC, agreeing with White Star Pump Co. LLC that the recovery is barred by the companies' contract for a pump that later malfunctioned.

  • December 03, 2021

    Attys Seek $1.5M For Walmart Slip-And-Fall Verdict

    Attorneys for a woman who won a $2 million jury award in a slip-and-fall suit against Walmart asked a Florida federal court on Thursday for $1.5 million in fees and costs under Florida's offer-of-judgment statute.

  • December 03, 2021

    Amazon Can't Renege On Quick Cashmere IP Trial, Judge Told

    Amazon.com Inc. should not be allowed to delay an agreed-upon bench trial set to start Tuesday on false advertising and trademark claims for allegedly selling knockoff cashmere products, an industry group told a Boston federal judge Friday.

  • December 02, 2021

    Avenatti Wants New Nike Trial Over Potential Brady Violation

    After winning a mistrial this summer in his California wire fraud case over prosecutors' failure to share potentially exculpatory evidence, Michael Avenatti told a New York federal judge Thursday that similar concerns require a new trial following his conviction for trying to extort $25 million from Nike.

  • December 02, 2021

    Calif. Board Diversity Law Essentially Voluntary, Judge Told

    A California Secretary of State's Office employee overseeing implementation of a law requiring publicly held corporations to place a minimum number of women on their boards testified during a bench trial Thursday that although the law allows for fines, no company has been penalized for noncompliance since its passage in 2018.  

  • December 02, 2021

    Columbia, NY Presbyterian To Pay $71.5M For OB-GYN Abuse

    Columbia University Irving Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital announced Wednesday that they will pay nearly $71.5 million in an agreement with dozens of women who were allegedly sexually abused by a former Columbia obstetrician-gynecologist.

  • December 02, 2021

    Attys Seek $113M In Fees From Glumetza Buyers' $454M Deal

    A class of direct Glumetza buyers who scored $454 million in settlements that will end several claims that drugmakers plotted to delay the generic version of the blockbuster diabetes drug asked a California federal court Wednesday to award plaintiffs' attorneys $112.8 million in fees and $2.4 million in costs.

  • December 02, 2021

    'Housewives' Star Says Feds Poisoned Trial With Hulu Doc

    "Real Housewives of Salt Lake City" star Jen Shah said two U.S. Department of Homeland Security investigators ignored Manhattan federal court rules by discussing her telemarketing fraud charges ahead of trial in a Hulu documentary released Monday.

  • December 02, 2021

    How The Pandemic Made This Judge A Zoom Trial 'MacGyver'

    State and federal courts in the Seattle area were pioneers in transitioning to remote proceedings when the COVID-19 pandemic began, and King County Superior Court Judge Matt Williams says there's no turning back now.

  • December 02, 2021

    Stoel Rives Hires Away Federal Prosecutor In Sacramento

    Stoel Rives LLP has nabbed a litigator with more than two decades of experience as a federal prosecutor to work in its Sacramento office.

  • December 02, 2021

    Judge Told To Slash 'Friday The 13th' Writer's $1.2M Atty Fees

    The fees that screenwriter Victor Miller seeks for the prominent copyright attorney who secured his win for the rights to his "Friday the 13th" script are needlessly high and based on improper tactics, according to opposition counsel's Wednesday memorandum.

  • December 02, 2021

    Quinn Emanuel Snags SS&C Technologies Holdings' CLO

    Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP has snagged a new financial litigation attorney with the hiring of SS&C Technologies Holdings' chief legal officer and head of mergers and acquisitions.

  • December 01, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Couple Cops To Fraud Ahead Of January Trial

    A California couple accused of paying a bribe to secure their son a better SAT score agreed Wednesday to plead guilty to fraud charges stemming from their role in the so-called Varsity Blues scheme, changing their pleas about a month before their case was set to head to trial.

  • December 01, 2021

    Calif. AG Defends Corp. Board Diversity Law As Trial Opens

    The California attorney general's office urged a state judge at the start of a bench trial Wednesday to reject a challenge to a law requiring publicly held corporations to place a minimum number of women on their boards of directors, arguing it benefits the state and is constitutional.

  • December 01, 2021

    USPTO, Fed. Circ. Picks Breeze Through Senate Questioning

    President Joe Biden's nominees to lead the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and fill a soon-to-be vacant seat on the Federal Circuit faced relatively friendly questions Wednesday from the Senate panel tasked with advancing their nominations.

  • December 01, 2021

    Texas Panel Affirms Awards Against Elevator Co. In Injury Suit

    A Texas appellate court has denied an elevator company's bid to escape a jury verdict and sanctions award in favor of a Louisiana man who was injured at a Lone Star State hotel, rejecting the company's argument that the exclusion of certain evidence at trial affected the jury's verdict.

Expert Analysis

  • Ohio Opioid Verdict Brings Focus To Role Of Pharmacists

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    The recent federal Ohio jury verdict in National Prescription Opiate Litigation found pharmacies liable for contributing to the public nuisance of the opioid epidemic, advancing the question of when pharmacists owe a duty to warn or refuse to fill a prescription, says Roseann Termini at Widener University's Delaware Law School.

  • Without Leadership Buy-In, Law Firm DEI Efforts Stand To Fail

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    A law firm's diversity, equity and inclusion strategies need the full attention and support of its top leadership to succeed, and requiring the firm's key decision makers to join the DEI committee can make the difference, says Noble Allen at Hinckley Allen.

  • Series

    Confronting Origination Credit: Self-Advocacy Tips For Attys

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    Female lawyers and lawyers of color have historically not been privy to the rules of the origination credit game, but they can employ various strategies to increase the chances of receiving the credit they are due, such as enlisting allies for support and tracking inequity patterns, says Marianne Trost at The Women Lawyers Coach.

  • SEC's Alleging An Asset Is A Security Does Not Make It So

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    In Audet v. Fraser, a Connecticut federal jury recently disagreed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's position that so-called hashlets are investment contracts, showing that the SEC's overreach in classifying digital assets, and the complexity of cryptocurrencies, require further guidance and case law to clarify the limits of federal securities law, say Nick Morgan and Ken Herzinger at Paul Hastings.

  • A Real-World Guide To Staying Discovery In Federal Court

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    Pleas for stay of discovery under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are often rejected when motions to dismiss are pending due to a tenacious tangle of case law, imposing financial and administrative burdens on parties, but some unambiguous rules of thumb can be gleaned to maximize the chances of a discovery stay, says Amir Shachmurove at Reed Smith.

  • How Advice-Of-Counsel Defense May Fare In Bannon Case

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    While it appears that Steve Bannon will say he relied on the advice of his counsel to defend contempt of Congress charges for noncompliance with a House subpoena, the viability of this argument turns on the precise contours of the legal advice his attorney provided, says Steven Gordon at Holland & Knight.

  • Record Award Shows Claims Court's Rising Role In IP Matters

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    The Court of Federal Claims' recent damages award of over $100 million in SecurityPoint Holdings v. U.S. — its largest-ever patent infringement award against the government — highlights the court's increasing importance in patent litigation, as well as its special jurisdiction requirements and fee standards, say Ranganath Sudarshan and Adam Mitchell at Covington.

  • Heed These Rules, Or Risk Your Argument On Appeal

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    Failing to meet the scattered requirements for appellate preservation can have dire consequences, so litigants must understand the relevant briefing rules, the differences between waiver and forfeiture, and the four components of a pressed argument in order to get their case fully considered on appeal and avoid sanctions or dismissal, says Michael Soyfer at Quinn Emanuel.

  • What To Include In Orders Governing Remote Arbitration

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    When conducting remote arbitration, attorneys should negotiate written orders that spell out clear rules on technology accommodations, document handling, witness readiness and other key considerations to ensure parties' rights are protected and the neutral's time is not wasted, say Matthew Williams and Christina Sarchio at Dechert.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: CBRE GC Talks Effective Compliance Emails

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    Good corporate governance requires communicating expectations for ethical conduct, but compliance emails need not be overly technical — a relatable story told in simple language with humility and respect can create internal communications that drive home the message, says Laurence Midler at CBRE.

  • The Hazards Of Female Lawyers Being 'Office Moms'

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    Female attorneys are frequently credited with being the "office moms" who do critical but undervalued work — from bringing birthday cakes to serving on diversity committees — but as lawyers return to offices, now is a good time for employers to rectify the gender imbalance that disadvantages women, say Ninth Circuit Judge Margaret McKeown and Fine Kaplan partner Roberta Liebenberg.

  • Discovery Immunity For Draft Expert Reports Lacks Clarity

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    Court rulings on whether — and when — drafts of expert reports are immune from discovery have been inconsistent, so the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure should be amended to better distinguish between draft and final expert reports, say attorneys at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • A Phased Approach To In-House Legal Tech Adoption

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    In-house legal departments that adopt new technologies too quickly often face frustration or failure, so to help ensure a smooth transition, companies should consider a multistep approach, depending on where they stand with respect to modernizing legal processes, says Tariq Hafeez at LegalEase Solutions.

  • Series

    Confronting Origination Credit: How Firms Can Redo Policies

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    To promote a more diverse and equitable workforce — not to mention better teamwork and higher profits — law firms must tackle common misconceptions about origination credit and design compensation systems that reflect four critical concepts about client relationships, says Blane Prescott at MesaFive.

  • How To Comply With ABA's New Language Access Guidance

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    Considering the American Bar Association's recent language access guidance for lawyers working with clients with whom communication is impeded, attorneys should carefully navigate social and cultural differences and take steps to maintain professional obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Deepika Ravi at Harris Wiltshire.

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