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Trials

  • June 18, 2018

    Mass. Jury Awards HIV Victim $18.4M In Malpractice Suit

    A Massachusetts federal jury on Monday awarded a New York man $18.4 million in a medical malpractice suit against three doctors over claims they failed to properly diagnose HIV, which left the man with severe health health problems and expenses.

  • June 18, 2018

    Judge ‘Troubled’ By Ukraine Hacker-Trader Turncoat’s Lies

    A Brooklyn federal judge warned prosecutors Monday to scrutinize a cooperating witness in their case against two men who allegedly traded on draft corporate press releases that were pinched by Ukrainian hackers after the cooperator admitted on the stand to deceiving the government.

  • June 18, 2018

    GCs Tackle Law Firm Culture In Diversity Push

    Following an American Bar Association pledge, in-house attorneys are taking a harder line in demanding diversity from their outside counsel, and they're seeking to play a larger role in the workings of the law firms they hire.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Hurdles Facing BigLaw’s Minority Women

    We asked BigLaw for data on female minority lawyers for the first time this year, and the results show an industry that is failing to attract and retain them. Here’s a look at the challenges facing these attorneys — and how a few firms are defying the norm.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Equity Partners

    The legal industry is making sluggish gains when it comes to attracting and retaining attorneys of color, but this select group of firms is taking broader strides to diversify at the top.

  • June 18, 2018

    Beats Designer Calls $107M Royalties Bid 'Dishonest'

    A designer who worked on the headphones at the heart of a $107 million royalty dispute between a businessman and Beats Electronics founders Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre told a California jury Monday that he declined to join the suit because he thought going after more royalties would be “dishonest.”

  • June 18, 2018

    LA County Not Liable For Atty’s $13.9M Crash, Panel Says

    A divided California appeals panel reversed a $13.9 million judgment against Los Angeles County on Monday, ruling in a published opinion that the local government can’t be held responsible for a public defender’s car crash on his commute home because he didn’t need his car to do his job that day.

  • June 18, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Backs Split Navy Patent Decision, Boosts Damages

    The Federal Circuit in a decision made public Monday upheld a ruling that one of the U.S. Navy’s littoral combat ships had infringed on a company’s fast ship patents and that another vessel had not, while slightly upping the damages award to $7.1 million.

  • June 18, 2018

    Ex-SUNY Prez Tells Jury He Cut Red Tape For 'Buffalo Billion'

    Former State University of New York President Alain Kaloyeros denied scheming with developers in a fraudulent end-run around the contracting process in Gov. Andrew Cuomo's "Buffalo Billion" revitalization effort, telling a Manhattan federal jury Monday his goal was to move nimbly on three projects worth $600 million.

  • June 18, 2018

    In Their Own Words: Minority Partners On Reaching The Top

    Despite decades of industrywide initiatives, movement up the ladder has stagnated for minority lawyers. Here, five industry success stories tell Law360 about the paths they took and what needs to change in BigLaw.

  • June 18, 2018

    NJ Justices Won't Review Helmet Co.'s Win In Bike Crash Suit

    The New Jersey Supreme Court declined to review a state appellate decision upholding a jury’s unanimous finding that a bicyclist who received quadriplegic injuries was wearing a non-defective helmet, according to a Friday filing.

  • June 18, 2018

    Texas State Senator Convicted Of Fraud Resigns

    A Texas state senator convicted of money laundering, securities fraud and other charges tied to an alleged scheme involving a fracking company announced on Monday that he plans to resign from office, after previously saying he did not plan to step aside despite the conviction.

  • June 18, 2018

    Former State Street Exec Mulls Testifying In His Fraud Trial

    A former head of global asset transitions at State Street's Boston headquarters will decide, potentially with less than 24 hours' notice, whether to take the stand this week to rebut charges that he hid millions of dollars in fees from some of the bank's biggest clients, his attorney said in federal court Monday.

  • June 15, 2018

    Minority Lawyers On Why They Left BigLaw

    Despite the proliferation of diversity committees and inclusion initiatives, corporate law firms remain overwhelmingly white and male, especially at leadership levels. Here, minority attorneys discuss their reasons for leaving a large firm.

  • June 15, 2018

    Taking On The ‘Petri Dish’ Of BigLaw Bias

    The often-informal processes for deciding matters like compensation at law firms can create, as one expert put it, a “petri dish” for the effects of unconscious bias. Here’s how some firms are looking to shake up the system.

  • June 15, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Attorneys

    While U.S. law firms have long vowed to make their ranks more diverse and inclusive, the industry has long failed to deliver on those promises. Here are the firms making some headway, according to this year’s Diversity Snapshot.

  • June 15, 2018

    Law360’s Diversity Snapshot: By The Numbers

    Efforts to increase diversity have again yielded few meaningful changes in law firm demographics, according to Law360’s annual headcount survey, even as law schools continue to enroll students of color in increasing numbers.

  • June 15, 2018

    Law360’s Pro Say: What BigLaw Should Do About Diversity

    For years law firms have had programs aimed at increasing attorney diversity, but nothing is working. On this week’s Pro Say podcast we take a look at our latest survey of diversity at law firms, and unpack what experts say are the things that could actually move the needle on this issue.

  • June 15, 2018

    Ky. High Court Decision Nixes $18M Nursing Home Suit Award

    A Kentucky appeals court said Friday a new trial is warranted for a nursing home negligence suit that ended in an $18 million jury verdict for the daughter of a deceased resident, saying a state high court ruling handed down during post-trial motions barred certain claims.

  • June 15, 2018

    Tire Co. Can't Get Trial Records Sealed After $38M Verdict

    A Virginia federal judge rejected a request by a Korean tire company to seal certain trial records in the wake of a $38 million negligence verdict against the manufacturer, saying in a ruling Thursday that the public’s right to access the records trumped its confidentiality concerns.

Expert Analysis

  • Knowledge Lawyers Can Help Firms Stay Ahead Of The Curve

    Vanessa Pinto Villa

    In a profession notoriously averse to change, it should come as no surprise that there is skepticism about the value of having attorneys perform nonbillable tasks. But U.S. law firms have slowly begun to incorporate knowledge lawyers into their operations — and the trend is likely to continue, says Vanessa Pinto Villa of Hogan Lovells.

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb: 1 Year Later

    Adam Pollet

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of California — limiting where plaintiffs can bring claims and curbing forum-shopping in mass tort litigation — courts have grappled with questions that the ruling did not address, and defendants have pursued jurisdictional defenses in class actions and federal cases that were not previously available, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland LLP.

  • High Court Answers Appeal Question For Consolidated Cases

    Desiree Moore

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Hall v. Hall is significant because it clarifies that parties have an immediate right of appeal following a final decision in actions consolidated under Rule 42(a). Companies that routinely face consolidation will have to be diligent in taking timely appeals, say Desiree Moore and Daisy Sexton of K&L Gates LLP.

  • A Few Tips For Affordable And Defensible ESI Collection

    Erich Potter

    In the course of litigation, one of the first steps you’ll take toward responding to a request for production of information — after issuing your litigation hold notice of course — is the collection of documents. Nearly everything else in e-discovery flows from this. Preserving metadata values of electronically stored information is especially critical, says Erich Potter, discovery counsel at Oles Morrison Rinker & Baker LLP.

  • An Unprecedented Look Inside The FARA Unit

    Brian Fleming

    For close observers of the Foreign Agents Registration Act, the June 8 release by the U.S. Department of Justice of over 50 FARA advisory opinions was a watershed. These opinions offer an unprecedented glimpse into how the FARA Registration Unit interprets the law, say Brian Fleming and Andrew Herman of Miller & Chevalier Chtd.

  • A Farxiga Opinion That's All Hat, No Cattle

    Lora Spencer

    Is everything really bigger in Texas? A New York federal court's ruling in Aron v. Bristol-Myers Squibb — apparently the first reported opinion from the Farxiga multidistrict litigation — would have us believe that pharmaceutical manufacturers have bigger tort liability under Texas law. But the court let the plaintiffs slide on a number of key points, says Lora Spencer of Reed Smith LLP.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 2

    John Reed Stark

    The legal industry has already begun to feel the impact of anti-bribery and anti-money laundering requirements. When involved with cryptocurrency trading and remittance, law firms face more than the risk of being perceived as organizations that support money laundering practices, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 1

    John Reed Stark

    Law firms are increasingly accepting cryptocurrency as payment for services. While this might seem innovative and forward-thinking, ironically it is much more of a throwback, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • Clearer Rule On Witness Compensation Disclosure Is Needed

    Ekaterina Long

    In April, the Fifth Circuit vacated a jury verdict in the Pinnacle hip implant product liability litigation due to undisclosed payments made to plaintiffs' experts. This issue would not have arisen if Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26(a)(2)(C) imposed an affirmative duty to make a complete disclosure regarding compensation of nonretained expert witnesses, says Ekaterina Long of Godwin Bowman & Martinez PC.

  • Breaking Down The 2nd Criminal Spoofing Trial: Part 2

    Clifford Histed

    The criminal prosecution of Andre Flotron was ill-fated and suffered from a series of missteps and miscalculations by the government. However, it is now beyond any legitimate dispute that spoofing occurs, that it is illegal, that prosecutors are willing and able to charge spoofing as a criminal violation, and that it is possible to prove those charges in court, say attorneys with K&L Gates LLP.