Trials

  • November 22, 2017

    Shkreli Deal Legit, Investor Says Ex-Katten Atty Told Him

    A former commodities trader and investor in one of Martin Shkreli's hedge funds and pharmaceutical company Retrophin Inc. told jurors Wednesday of how former Katten Muchin attorney Evan Greebel assured him that an allegedly sham deal to pay him off for his investment was aboveboard.

  • November 22, 2017

    Oilfield Services Co. Hit With $45.3M Verdict In Crash Row

    A unanimous jury in Bexar County, Texas, found in favor of a woman injured in a car accident when an oilfield services company employee rear-ended her, awarding her a total of $45.3 million in damages, including $32.5 million in punitive damages.

  • November 22, 2017

    Breaking Down Waymo's Trade Secrets Trial With Uber

    Google's driverless car spinoff Waymo will face off in one week against Uber over its claims that the ride-hailing behemoth stole billion-dollar Waymo technology that could tilt the future of the nascent self-driving car industry when it acquired a former Waymo engineer's startup. Here, Law360 takes a look at the case in advance of the trial.

  • November 22, 2017

    3 Highlights From The FIFA Corruption Trial So Far

    More than two years after U.S. authorities rocked the world of international soccer by unveiling a global corruption investigation into it, the first trial stemming from the investigation kicked off in a federal court in Brooklyn this month, providing a clearer picture of the alleged corruption, while bringing witness intimidation allegations akin to a mob trial. Here, Law360 looks at three highlights from the first two weeks of the trial.

  • November 22, 2017

    No New Trial For Parents Suing Abbott Over Birth Defects

    An Ohio federal judge on Wednesday refused to grant a new trial to parents of a child born with birth defects who claimed that Abbott Laboratories Inc. didn't warn patients of the risks of its anticonvulsant drug Depakote, finding the jury wasn't given erroneous instructions.

  • November 22, 2017

    DOJ Tells Justices Forced Statements Can Be Used Pretrial

    The U.S. Department of Justice recently urged the Supreme Court not to protect suspects from having their compelled statements used at pretrial hearings, saying applying the Fifth Amendment that early would bog down criminal proceedings.

  • November 22, 2017

    Jury Awards Toy Co. $10.3M In Profits For Water Balloon IP

    A Texas federal jury on Tuesday awarded $10.25 million in lost profits to a toy company over two patents for a relatively new water balloon-filling device, copycats of which were allegedly sold by Telebrands Corp. at Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. and other retailers — just weeks before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board is set to hold its own trial over the two patents.

  • November 21, 2017

    MD In Health Care Fraud Trial Has Mental Defect, Jurors Told

    A Northern California doctor on trial with her orthopedic surgeon boyfriend for allegedly committing health care fraud and money laundering is very talented and able but has a mental defect that affects her day-to-day functioning, a neuropsychologist told jurors Tuesday in the California federal trial.

  • November 21, 2017

    Palm Families Make Final Bid For $71M In Licensing Fees

    Family members behind the famous Palm steakhouse in Manhattan said Tuesday in closing trial arguments that they were cheated out of $71 million in intellectual property licensing value by the cousins who built a single trendy outpost into an empire, and certain family members essentially relied on a lack of scrutiny to stick to an extremely low status-quo licensing fee.

  • November 21, 2017

    Ex-Swiss Banker Acquitted Of Helping US Tax Evaders

    A New York federal jury on Tuesday acquitted a former Swiss banker of what prosecutors alleged was a criminal conspiracy to help U.S. taxpayers hide millions of dollars in undeclared income in offshore bank accounts to dodge taxes.

  • November 21, 2017

    7-Eleven Settles Prop 65 Coffee Case, Will Post Signs

    7-Eleven Inc. will post signage alerting California consumers to the presence of a cancer-linked chemical in coffee products and pay $900,000 in penalties and costs, according to a settlement approved by a California judge on Tuesday in a Proposition 65 case that’s still ongoing against dozens of other coffee roasters and retailers.

  • November 21, 2017

    Ex-Ecuador Soccer Boss' Son Says He Helped Launder Bribes

    The son of the former leader of Ecuador's national soccer organization told jurors at the FIFA corruption trial on Tuesday about laundering his father's kickbacks from a sports marketing company, and choked up empathizing with other ex-soccer officials who are on trial.

  • November 21, 2017

    Ex-Galleon Trader Says He Didn't Report Shkreli To Feds

    A former Galleon Group trader turned Deutsche Bank project manager on Tuesday told jurors that he never reached out to federal prosecutors about his suspicions that Martin Shkreli was engaged in a market manipulation scheme with Retrophin Inc. stock despite having dropped the dime on his old boss at Galleon.

  • November 21, 2017

    Bet-The-Business Merger Trial? O'Melveny Gets Tapped Again

    As the government tries to block AT&T from buying Time Warner in what could be the first merger trial under the new administration, the telecom giant has put its hopes for a digital content future in the hands of a firm that's been no stranger to courtroom faceoffs in the last decade. Here, Law360 looks at the biggest challenges O'Melveny & Myers LLP has defended in recent years.

  • November 21, 2017

    Judge Suggests Anonymous Jury In Iran Sanctions Trial

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday suggested using an anonymous jury in the upcoming trial of Turkiye Halk Bankasi AS executive Mehmet Hakan Atilla on charges of scheming to dodge U.S. sanctions against Iran, following reports that “third parties” have contacted people involved in the case.

  • November 21, 2017

    Pa. Justices To Mull Evidence Allowed In Med Mal Cases

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court said Monday it would hear arguments over whether evidence of the known risks and complications of medical procedures should have been allowed into a medical malpractice case against the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center over an allegedly botched hysterectomy.

  • November 21, 2017

    CFPB, CashCall Spar Over Possible $287M In Restitution

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau squared off against CashCall Inc. and its affiliates in California federal court on Monday about whether it would be appropriate to make the online lender pay as much as $287 million for deceiving consumers, with the CFPB calling the company’s loans “financial snake oil” and CashCall saying its business was legitimate.

  • November 20, 2017

    Court Skeptical Of All In Koch, Oxbow Post-Trial Argument

    A Delaware vice chancellor cautioned Monday that he remained “skeptical of both sides” after post-trial arguments over a private equity investor’s bid to cash out or force a sale of billionaire William I. Koch’s Oxbow Carbon LLC.

  • November 20, 2017

    Uber Slams Waymo's Bid To Tell Jury Of Missing Evidence

    A jury shouldn’t hear allegations Uber destroyed evidence in Waymo LLC’s suit over allegedly stolen self-driving car trade secrets, Uber told a California federal judge Monday, saying Waymo’s request was untimely and didn’t meet the “stringent requirements” of proving Uber destroyed evidence knowing it would be sued.

  • November 20, 2017

    Ex-Galleon Trader Details Shkreli Vendetta At Ex-Katten Atty Trial

    A Deutsche Bank project manager and former Galleon Group trader on Monday told the jury weighing the fate of Martin Shkreli’s former Katten Muchin attorney of how the now-incarcerated former pharmaceutical executive harassed his family over a stock ownership dispute, but came under fire on cross-examination over a trade he made on inside information while at Galleon.

Expert Analysis

  • SDNY Case Raises Provocative Questions On US Jurisdiction

    Louis Rothberg

    U.S. v. Reza Zarrab, set to start trial this month in the Southern District of New York, is likely to affect the manner in which entities and individuals decide to comply with the Office of Foreign Assets Control's secondary sanctions and represents a critical interpretive question regarding the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, say attorneys with Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • Roundup

    Judging A Book

    Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law

    Are the latest books on the judicial system worth reading? Federal judges share their thoughts in this series of book reviews.

  • Don't Waste This Planning Cycle: Year-End Strategies

    Hugh A. Simons

    Law firms are businesses where partners operate with significant autonomy. To see their priorities translate into individual partner action, firm leaders should use a few collaborative strategies, suggests Hugh A. Simons, former senior partner of The Boston Consulting Group and former COO of Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Deflating Uber's 'Puffery' Defense On Safety Claims

    Thomas Dickerson

    Uber and taxi companies in California, Texas and New York are debating whether Uber's use of words like "safe" and "safety" is misleading and deceptive or mere "puffery." Conflicting rulings from federal courts suggest litigation on this issue will continue, says retired New York State Supreme Court Associate Justice Thomas Dickerson.

  • From Snaps To Tweets: The Craft Of Social Media Discovery

    Matthew Hamilton

    Courts have consistently held that social media accounts are subject to established discovery principles but are reluctant to allow parties to rummage through private social media accounts. Recent case law confirms that narrowly tailored information requests get the best results, say Matthew Hamilton, Donna Fisher and Jessica Bae of Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Consultant Contracts Can Create California Connection

    Anne Gruner

    A California court recently held that it has specific personal jurisdiction over nonresident defendants for nonresident plaintiffs’ claims, because the defendants had contracts with two California consultants on the design of the hip implant at issue. This case could lead to more plaintiffs using consulting contracts to subject defendants to suit in particular jurisdictions, says Anne Gruner of Duane Morris LLP.

  • Series

    My Strangest Day In Court: Arguing From The Gallery

    M.C. Sungaila

    Appellate lawyers are usually silent observers at trial who collaborate on legal strategy, conduct research during court breaks, and craft jury instructions, verdict forms and major motions. But as I discovered in one trial, this is not always the case, says M.C. Sungaila of Haynes and Boone LLP.

  • An Interview With Former DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson

    Randy Maniloff

    Jeh Johnson, the former secretary of homeland security, was kind enough to let me visit him to reflect on his diverse career. He told stories that left me speechless. And yes, the man who was responsible for the Transportation Security Administration removed his shoes when going through airport security. You bet I asked, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • Hurdles To Consider When Securing A Personnel File

    Michael Errera

    Attorneys should follow seven key points to ensure that their discovery requests and pleadings are appropriately prepared to overcome common hurdles that may be encountered when requesting production of a personnel file, say Michael Errera and Paul Ferland of Foran Glennon Palandech Ponzi & Rudloff PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Gilstrap Reviews 'Alexander Hamilton'

    Judge Rodney Gilstrap

    While Alexander Hamilton is the subject of a hit Broadway musical and renewed biographical examinations, professor Kate Brown takes us down a road less traveled in her book "Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law" — showing Hamilton as first, last and foremost an American lawyer, says U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap of the Eastern District of Texas.