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Trials

  • February 20, 2019

    Ex-KPMGer Admits Serial Tax And Bank Fraud, Cover-Up

    An accountant who turned against his former colleagues at KPMG and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board in a federal fraud case told a Manhattan jury Wednesday that he and his co-conspirators tried to cover up their crimes — and admitted that he also scammed the IRS and a lender for years without fully disclosing it to prosecutors until the eve of trial.

  • February 20, 2019

    Feds Say New Data Won't Buy Spoofer Coscia A New Trial

    Federal prosecutors told an Illinois federal judge on Wednesday that "newly discovered evidence" Michael Coscia references in his bid for a new trial is immaterial and was available prior to the 2015 trial in which he became the first person to be convicted of spoofing the commodities markets.

  • February 20, 2019

    Ex-Barclays Forex Chief Faces Calif. Jury Over HP 'Spanking'

    Federal prosecutors argued Wednesday during the opening of a California jury trial that a former Barclays PLC trader cheated Hewlett-Packard Co. out of millions in a £6 billion ($7.82 billion) options transaction by telling colleagues to "spank the market, good and proper" in order to drive its value down.

  • February 20, 2019

    Witness Says He Bribed Fla. Officials For Nursing Home Mogul

    A key government witness in the $1 billion health care fraud trial of Philip Esformes told jurors Wednesday about how he would bribe state officials on Esformes’ behalf to get advance warning of when his nursing homes and assisted living facilities would be inspected.

  • February 20, 2019

    Ga. Medical Group's Trial Win Affirmed In Foot Surgery Suit

    A Georgia appeals court on Wednesday affirmed an Atlanta medical group’s trial win over medical malpractice claims brought by a woman who alleged surgical hardware was left in her foot, rejecting the woman’s argument that her treating physician should have been allowed to offer expert testimony on her behalf.

  • February 20, 2019

    Doc's Win OK'd In Suit Over Colleague's Career-Ending Injury

    A Maryland surgeon who injured a fellow surgeon while operating on a patient was cleared of liability in a suit accusing him of ending his colleague’s career, after a state appeals court held Tuesday that an eyewitness to the incident was properly excluded by the trial judge.

  • February 20, 2019

    Slot Game Maker Awarded Another $1.74M In Copyright Row

    International Game Technology PLC must pay an additional $1.74 million in statutory damages, an Illinois federal judge ruled Wednesday, after a jury found that the company infringed slot game maker GC2 Inc.'s copyrighted artwork when launching certain games for online play,

  • February 20, 2019

    Nebraska Firefighter Scores $1.2M Win In Retaliation Suit

    A Nebraska federal jury awarded $1.2 million to a fire captain who claimed the city of Lincoln retaliated against him for reporting the harassment of a Kurdish female firefighter recruit from Iraq and then complaining about his alleged subsequent mistreatment.

  • February 20, 2019

    NJ Court Won't Salvage Heart Attack Suit Against Cardiologist

    A New Jersey appeals court upheld a jury’s finding in favor of a cardiologist accused of negligence in treating a man who later died of a heart attack, saying on Wednesday that the trial court’s rulings were fair.

  • February 20, 2019

    Monsanto Gets Gift With Two-Stage Roundup Bellwether

    After being hit with a $78 million loss in state court over claims its Roundup weedkiller causes cancer, Bayer AG's Monsanto unit could turn its luck around in the first federal bellwethers over the herbicide now that it has convinced a federal judge to split the trials in two in an unconventional way.

  • February 20, 2019

    Judge Skeptical Of Ex-Novartis Exec's Whistleblower Claims

    A New Jersey state judge cast doubt Wednesday on a former Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. executive's whistleblower claims that she was fired in retaliation for objecting to a proposed drug study, noting at a midtrial hearing that the proposal was revised based on her input after she was asked to review it.

  • February 20, 2019

    Ex-State Street Exec Decries Evidence Used To Convict Him

    A former State Street Corp. executive sentenced to prison for masterminding a scheme to charge overseas investors undisclosed fees on massive transactions urged the First Circuit to overturn his conviction, arguing Tuesday that the government’s evidence didn’t meet the burdens of securities fraud law.

  • February 20, 2019

    Feds Blast Kids' Bid To Halt Gov't Fossil Fuel Approvals

    The federal government fought a legal bid to halt all new fossil fuel development, telling the Ninth Circuit that young people suing the federal government over policies they say worsen climate change have no basis to seek such a sweeping action.

  • February 20, 2019

    $95M Trademark Verdict Against Walmart Approved By Judge

    A federal judge has approved a jury verdict that hit Walmart with an unusually large $95 million in damages for willfully infringing a smaller chain's "Backyard" trademark, paving the way for an appeal from the retail giant.

  • February 20, 2019

    Jury Clears Chipotle In Post-Miscarriage Discrimination Suit

    A California federal jury on Wednesday cleared Chipotle Mexican Grill of allegations that it discriminated against an assistant store manager by firing her after she suffered a miscarriage and took time off work to seek mental health treatment.

  • February 19, 2019

    Trump Picks Ex-Kirkland Partner Rosen For Deputy AG Seat

    President Donald Trump unveiled plans Tuesday to nominate former Kirkland & Ellis LLP partner and current U.S. Department of Transportation Deputy Secretary Jeffrey Rosen as the new deputy attorney general, the White House said in a release.

  • February 19, 2019

    Witness Says He Betrayed Esformes After Suicide Suggestion

    A key government witness put an exclamation point on Tuesday's testimony in the $1 billion health care fraud trial of Philip Esformes, holding little back in recounting his reaction when the Miami nursing home mogul allegedly suggested the witness should kill himself rather than face charges related to their alleged scheme.

  • February 19, 2019

    Judge Limits Evidence For Roundup Bellwether Trial

    A California federal judge has ruled that conflicting reports about the herbicide glyphosate's safety should be excluded from the initial phase of next week’s bellwether trial over claims that Monsanto's Roundup product causes cancer, ruling they would distract jurors being asked to evaluate the scientific evidence in the case.

  • February 19, 2019

    Clyde & Co. Atty Describes Cancer's Shadow In J&J Talc Trial

    A Clyde & Co. attorney took the stand Tuesday to deliver emotional testimony in a California trial over claims that Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder contained asbestos that caused his wife's cancer, telling jurors she struggles with fears that she'll die before their two teenage daughters graduate high school.

  • February 19, 2019

    Ericsson's Licensing Offer To HTC Is FRAND, Texas Jury Finds

    A Texas federal jury on Friday rejected HTC’s allegation that Ericsson is trying to overcharge on licensing fees for its standard-essential cellular patents, finding that the Swedish telecom giant’s offer to HTC is fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory and that both companies failed to negotiate in good faith.

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    A Chat With McDermott COO John Yoshimura

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    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature John Yoshimura, chief operating officer at McDermott Will & Emery LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Problem With 'Optimal' Diversity

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    Organizations should seek to avoid discrimination, but they should also be wary of the idea that diverse teams function better than nondiverse teams, because this reasoning lacks evidence and can lead to a slippery slope, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research LLC.

  • Identifying Jurors Who Are Susceptible To The Reptile Strategy

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    A recent survey we conducted suggests that jurors who are most susceptible to the "reptile" strategy — convincing them that the defendant is a threat — can be preemptively identified by gauging their reaction to specific safety concerns, says Christina Marinakis of Litigation Insights.

  • Scope Of An Expert's 'Expertise' Can Make Or Break A Case

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    When selecting and proffering an expert, it is critical to ensure that the expert’s conclusions are actually based on his or her expertise. The recent Fifth Circuit decision in Sandifer v. Hoyt Archery Inc. clearly — and tragically — illustrates this point, says Adrienne Koch of Katsky Korins LLP.

  • Mediation Opening Arguments Should Not Be A Throwdown

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    Presenting a powerful opening statement at mediation plays an important role in achieving success, but you need to reach into your toolbox for more than just a hammer, says Anthony Rospert of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Fresh Takes On Seeking Costs And Fees Under Rule 45

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    Recent case law reveals that courts vary widely in their approaches to shifting the costs and fees incurred in responding to a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 45 subpoena. Nonparties responding to such requests should consider certain district court trends, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Retailers At Risk From New Glyphosate Liability Theories

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    As Monsanto faces the first bellwether trial in the federal multidistrict litigation over its herbicide glyphosate, consumer groups' pursuit of other companies in the glyphosate supply chain and scientific debate over the chemical's toxicity mean that more lawsuits are likely, say attorneys with Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Smith Camp Reviews 'Echo Of Its Time'

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    "Echo of Its Time" is the story of Nebraska’s federal district court from statehood in 1867 to the demise of Prohibition in 1933. Professors John Wunder and Mark Scherer have written an objective, unsentimental and insightful history, layered with context and rich in character study, says U.S. District Judge Laurie Smith Camp of the District of Nebraska.

  • Let’s Make A Record: High Court On Trans Military Ban

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to stay injunctions in Trump v. Karnoski and Trump v. Stockman drew fire from advocates for transgender troops, the order merely suggests that the parties create a factual record — which is what we did in the trial that ended the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, says Dan Woods of Musick Peeler & Garrett LLP.

  • Guest Feature

    'The Mooch' Talks Mayhem, Con Law, Lessons From Harvard

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    Anthony Scaramucci is probably best known for the 11 days he spent as White House director of communications in 2017. But when White and Williams LLP attorney Randy Maniloff sat down to chat with "the Mooch," he was interested in hearing a different story.