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Trials

  • August 14, 2018

    Fla. Woman Wins $4.6M In Sex Abuse Suit Against Her Parents

    A Florida jury has awarded $4.6 million in a suit brought by a woman who accused her father of sexually abusing her for 16 years while her mother negligently failed to prevent the abuse, her lawyers announced Tuesday.

  • August 14, 2018

    Rimini Still Owes Oracle $28.5M Attys' Fees In IP Suit

    A Nevada federal judge on Tuesday ordered Rimini Street Inc. to pay Oracle Corp. $28.5 million in attorneys' fees after years of litigation in their copyright infringement case, saying the award was still justified even though the Ninth Circuit reversed Oracle’s state-law claims.

  • August 14, 2018

    How One Firm Moved The Needle On Disability Inclusion

    This global law firm has recently focused on creating opportunities for people with disabilities across its ranks, and its efforts are already showing results. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 14, 2018

    Chinese Billionaire Asks 2nd Circ. To Deep-Six Conviction

    Chinese real estate mogul Ng Lap Seng has asked the Second Circuit to void his conviction for bribing United Nations ambassadors to get support for a conference center project in Macau, saying the government misapplied U.S. law to cover an intergovernmental organization like the U.N.

  • August 14, 2018

    Jury Awards $5.4M To Trucking Co. Worker For Crushed Leg

    A West Virginia federal jury awarded $5.42 million on Tuesday to a man whose leg was crushed at work, saying two trucking companies, including his employer, were responsible.

  • August 14, 2018

    Bourbon Maker Asks 9th Circ. To Revive Wine Co. IP Row

    Spirits maker Sazerac Co. Inc. urged the Ninth Circuit to revive its suit alleging that a winemaker infringed its Buffalo Trace bourbon trademark, saying it lost a bench trial because the district court didn't even try to determine whether Fetzer Vineyards Inc.'s own buffalo logo-bearing product was likely to confuse customers.

  • August 14, 2018

    Insurer Seeks Win In Dispute Over Dish TCPA Judgment

    Insurer National Union wants a Denver federal court to order that it need not cover policyholder Dish Network LLC after Dish was hit with a $280 million verdict for placing millions of robocalls, saying Monday its situation echoes that of a primary insurer recently let off the hook.

  • August 14, 2018

    NCAA, Players Can Use O'Bannon Evidence In Antitrust Trial

    The California federal judge who will try claims the NCAA illegally prevents athletes from being paid beyond their scholarships said Monday she will admit evidence from the landmark O'Bannon case, overriding multiple objections from both the sports body and the students.

  • August 14, 2018

    You Can't Deadlock In 3 Hours, NY Judge Tells Bribery Jury

    A Manhattan federal judge told jurors mulling fraud and conspiracy counts against Norman Seabrook, the former labor boss accused of steering $20 million in union money to a hedge fund in exchange for a $60,000 bribe, to go back to work Tuesday after they quickly said they were unanimous on one charge but deadlocked on the other.

  • August 14, 2018

    Manafort's Defense Rests Without Bringing Evidence

    Attorneys for former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort rested their case on Tuesday, declining to present evidence to rebut the government's allegations that the political consultant concealed overseas earnings from the U.S. government to avoid paying taxes and borrowed money using bogus financial documents.

  • August 14, 2018

    Ga. Court Convicts Cybercriminal On $6M ID Theft Charges

    A Nigerian citizen was found guilty of aggravated identity theft charges by a jury in a Georgia federal court after stealing more than $6 million from American universities with his partner, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Monday.

  • August 13, 2018

    LED Co. Wins $66M In Trade Secrets Row With Chinese Rival

    A California jury awarded LED lighting company Lumileds LLC $66 million on Friday, finding that the chairman of China’s Elec-Tech International Co. Ltd. had paid a former Lumileds employee to steal trade secrets so that he could implement them in his company’s products.

  • August 13, 2018

    David Boies On How Dyslexia Shaped His Practice

    One of the country’s highest-profile litigators, the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP chairman was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in his 30s. In an interview with Law360, he talks about practicing law with the learning disability. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    Banker Pushed $16M Manafort Loans Despite Risk, Jury Told

    The CEO of Federal Savings Bank pushed through $16 million in bank loans to Paul Manafort despite concerns of too much risk to the bank posed by lending to the president's former campaign manager, a bank executive told a Virginia federal jury Monday.

  • August 13, 2018

    NJ Doc’s Trial Win OK’d In Suit Over Sponge Left In Patient

    A New Jersey appeals court on Monday affirmed a verdict clearing a surgeon of negligently leaving a surgical sponge inside a patient following surgery, saying the surgeon proved he followed the applicable standard of care.

  • August 13, 2018

    Ex-Union Boss Like 'Con Man' Cooperator, Bribery Jury Hears

    Counsel for Norman Seabrook, the former labor boss accused of steering $20 million of union capital to a now-bankrupt hedge fund for a $60,000 bribe, told a Manhattan jury Monday that a key government witness is a “con man” who can't be trusted, but a prosecutor said both men are “cut from the same cloth.”

  • August 13, 2018

    Mass. Health Agency Owner Sentenced For Medicaid Fraud

    The owner of a Boston-based home health agency has been sentenced to two to three years in state prison after a jury convicted her of stealing millions from the state’s Medicaid program, according to an announcement Monday by state Attorney General Maura Healey.

  • August 13, 2018

    Man Gets 8 Years In Prison For Oil And Gas Scheme

    A federal judge on Friday sentenced a man to more than eight years in prison for wire fraud and money laundering in connection with allegations that he falsely told investors he owned oil and gas leases in Montana, Texas and Oklahoma, including on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation.

  • August 13, 2018

    Oil And Gas Co. Denied New Trials Over Workers' OT Awards

    A Pennsylvania federal judge turned down an oil and gas contractor's bid for do-overs on a pair of trials that awarded two groups of workers $1 million in back pay for overtime in addition to the sizable per-job bonuses the company already gave them.

Expert Analysis

  • Ensnarement — A 2nd Bite At The Noninfringement Apple

    Brian D. Coggio

    Ensnarement is a potent defense to a finding of infringement under the doctrine of equivalents, as seen last month when a Massachusetts federal court granted Celltrion’s motion for summary judgment of noninfringement, holding that Janssen’s proposed hypothetical claims ensnared the prior art, say Brian D. Coggio and Ron Vogel of Fish & Richardson PC.

  • Why A Hoverboard Suit Against Amazon Went Up In Flames

    Jed Winer

    Should an e-commerce firm be held liable for the defects of every item it sells on its global internet marketplace? The plaintiffs in Fox v. Amazon.com argued exactly that, and the district court answered with a resounding “no.” Online marketplaces are simply not in a position to supervise every product sold on their platforms, says Jed Winer of Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Employment Litigation And Jury Opinions In A #MeToo World

    Ellen Brickman

    Jurors’ beliefs about social inequality, intergroup differences and disparate treatment are likely to play a role in their evaluations of discrimination and harassment claims, especially in the current political climate. To understand that role better, we undertook a survey of registered voters in New York and Los Angeles, say Ellen Brickman and Chad Lackey of DOAR Inc.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • 2 Strikes And You’re Out: The Litvak Saga Comes To An End

    Joon Kim

    The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Connecticut, following reversals of two prior convictions, has moved to dismiss its remaining securities fraud claim against bond trader Jesse Litvak. While it can be difficult to prove misstatements are material as a matter of law, the government's move is certainly not a death knell for similarly grounded fraud charges, say attorneys with Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.

  • Tackling Digital Class Notice With Rule 23 Changes

    Brandon Schwartz

    Proposed modifications to Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, scheduled to take effect at the end of this year, will officially recognize the use of electronic notice in class action administrations. Brandon Schwartz and Maggie Ivey of Garden City Group LLC provide guidance on navigating a daunting digital landscape.