We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Trials

  • November 14, 2018

    J&J Should Pay For Talc Devotee's Death, SC Jury Hears

    Johnson & Johnson should pay tens of millions of dollars in recompense for the life of a South Carolina lawyer who succumbed to mesothelioma at 30 after using talcum powder from birth, her husband's lawyers told a jury Wednesday at the close of a retrial in the case.

  • November 14, 2018

    Ex-UN Boss Bribe Plans Are Fair Game In FCPA Trial

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday said the government may introduce evidence in the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act trial of the head of a Chinese nongovernmental organization that he planned to bribe the same United Nations official at the center of Chinese real estate billionaire Ng Lap Seng’s bribery case.

  • November 14, 2018

    Insurer Must Pay $11.6M Plane Crash Judgment, Judge Says

    A Kansas judge has ruled that the liability insurer for a pilot killed in a 2013 plane crash must cover an $11.6 million judgment entered against the pilot’s estate in a wrongful death lawsuit, finding that the insurer’s failure to promptly offer its $100,000 policy limit to settle the claim led to the massive award.

  • November 14, 2018

    9th Circ. Judge Doubts Bio-Rad Appeal Of Ex-GC's $11M Win

    A Ninth Circuit judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc.'s arguments in favor of overturning an $11 million whistleblower judgment against the company, repeatedly questioning its counsel during a hearing on how an erroneous jury instruction would change the outcome of the verdict.

  • November 14, 2018

    Calif. Jury Deadlocks In J-M Bad Pipes Damages Bellwether

    A California federal judge declared a mistrial on Wednesday in a bellwether False Claims Act suit against J-M Manufacturing after a jury deadlocked on the amount the company owes a group of municipalities that paid $2.1 million for pipes that didn’t meet federal strength standards.

  • November 14, 2018

    J&J Staves Off Asbestos Baby Powder Suit In Calif. Jury Win

    A California state jury found Wednesday that although Johnson & Johnson's baby powder contained asbestos and a manufacturing defect, it was not a substantial factor in causing a woman's malignant mesothelioma, ruling in favor of the pharmaceutical giant.

  • November 14, 2018

    On Appeal, Wash U. Defeats Jury Award In Disability Bias Suit

    A Missouri appeals court reversed a former Washington University employee's win in her suit alleging that she was fired in retaliation for requesting a disability accommodation, ruling that the jury that awarded her $769,000 hadn't been properly instructed.

  • November 14, 2018

    Bio-Rad Wins $24M Jury Verdict In 10X Genomics Patent Suit

    A Delaware federal judge on Wednesday ordered 10X Genomics Inc. to pay nearly $24 million to Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc. and the University of Chicago after a jury found that it infringed a droplet-based method of manipulating DNA.

  • November 14, 2018

    Pa. Panel Urged To Revive Risperdal Breast-Growth Case

    A Philadelphia judge’s mid-trial decision axing claims against a Johnson & Johnson unit over breast growth allegedly linked to the antipsychotic medication Risperdal came under fire Wednesday as a state appeals court heard arguments that the case had been improperly dismissed for lack of scientific proof.

  • November 14, 2018

    Ex-State Street Exec Gets 6 Mos. For Role In Fraud Scheme

    Despite a passionate plea to avoid serving time behind bars 5,000 miles away from his home, a former State Street Corp. executive was sentenced to six months in federal prison Wednesday for his role in a scheme to tack on millions of dollars in hidden fees to unsuspecting international clients.

  • November 14, 2018

    Deal Struck In Suit Over Last Photos Of Marilyn Monroe

    A copyright fight over Marilyn Monroe's "Last Sitting" photographs ended Tuesday with a settlement in principle between the estate of a famous photographer and two of his former assistants, according to a New York federal judge.  

  • November 14, 2018

    Ex-Dewey Exec Trying To Ax $1M Fine Deserves Jail, DA Says

    Counsel for Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP's former chief financial officer will square off Thursday in Manhattan with prosecutors who claim the ex-executive should be jailed after asking a New York state judge to toss or reduce the $1 million fine he was sentenced to pay following his fraud conviction last year.

  • November 14, 2018

    Aveo CFO Testifies He Had Support For Disclosure Decisions

    Lawyers, board members and company officials all signed off on a decision by Aveo Pharmaceuticals to not tell investors about a recommendation for a new clinical trial, Aveo's former chief financial officer testified Wednesday as the defendant in a civil securities fraud case in Massachusetts federal court.

  • November 14, 2018

    Amrock Says Fraud Led To $706M IP Verdict, Seeks New Trial

    Amrock, formerly known as Title Source Inc., has asked a state district court judge in Texas to order a new trial in its dispute with HouseCanary Inc. that resulted in it being slammed with a $706 million verdict, alleging an extensive fraud led to the result.

  • November 13, 2018

    Palm Families Get More Than $73M In Royalty Fees, Rent

    A New York state judge on Tuesday awarded family members behind the famous Palm steakhouse — who say they were cheated out of intellectual property licensing by the cousins who built a single trendy outpost into an empire — at least $73 million in royalties and lost rent.

  • November 13, 2018

    MillerCoors Wants To Drain Pabst, Jury Told In $400M Spat

    MillerCoors is trying to pour Pabst Brewing Co.'s business down the drain by raising prices under its exclusive agreement to brew Pabst's beers, Pabst said Tuesday during opening statements in the Wisconsin trial over its $400 million contract suit, while MillerCoors said the allegations of a malevolent plot are "perfectly false."

  • November 13, 2018

    Express Scripts, Pharmacy Drama Ends With Last-Minute Deal

    On the first day of trial for a whirlwind breach of contract case between HM Compounding Services LLC and Express Scripts Inc. that has involved attorneys running for the door and significant discovery misconduct, the outstanding claims quickly wrapped up and the parties told a Missouri federal judge Tuesday that they had settled the case.

  • November 13, 2018

    Ky. Court Won't Disturb Jury Award In Murder Plot Case

    A Kentucky appeals court has ruled that the wife of a slain former county sheriff can't modify a jury's $28,000 award in a suit accusing a former Harlan County deputy sheriff and a political rival of wrongful death, saying the evidence supported the jury's decision.

  • November 13, 2018

    Texas Contractor CEO Didn't Rip Off NASA, Jury Says

    A Texas federal jury has delivered an acquittal in a criminal fraud case accusing the CEO of a NASA contractor of falsely representing hours worked and costs, according to the executive’s lawyer.

  • November 13, 2018

    Tata Encouraged 'Expats Versus Locals' Culture, Jury Hears

    A California federal jury considering class claims that Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. discriminates against non-South Asians heard taped deposition testimony Tuesday from a former Tata senior human resources manager, who said that the company prioritizes visa holders and the culture was “expats versus locals.”

Expert Analysis

  • Don't Panic: Harvey Doesn't Alter Florida's Bad Faith Standard

    Stephen Marino

    Despite the Florida Supreme Court’s consistency with 80 years of precedent in its latest bad faith ruling, Harvey v. Geico, the dissenting opinions — and recent commentary — predict that “mere negligence has now become bad faith” and warn of fabricated claims and market chaos. Stephen Marino and Benjamin Hassebrock of Ver Ploeg & Lumpkin PA disagree.

  • Simple Secrets For Improving Your CLE

    Daniel Karon

    With few cases going to trial, many attorneys keep their oral-presentation skills sharp by teaching continuing legal education programs. To avoid giving a CLE that falls flat and damages your reputation, you must fashion a thoughtful message, control its presentation, and nail the beginning and ending, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • It’s Time For Law Firms To Start Talking About Gen Z

    Eliza Stoker

    Since the oldest members of Generation Z aren’t even finished with law school yet, law firm management is in a unique position to prepare for their entrance into the legal workforce, says Eliza Stoker of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • ​The New Reality Of Patent Trials Post-Halo

    Jeremy Taylor

    ​Jury verdicts following the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2016 Halo decision suggest that previous patent litigation strategies are no longer working for trial-bound cases, say attorneys with Baker Botts LLP.

  • Should Juries Try To Predict FDA Drug Labeling Decisions?

    Alan Klein

    The U.S. Supreme Court's review of Merck v. Albrecht promises to shape the way decisions of regulatory agencies — such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s rejection of a drug manufacturer’s proposed label warning — can be interpreted by juries, say Alan Klein and Matthew Decker at Duane Morris LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Yale's Linda Greenhouse Talks Journalism

    Linda Greenhouse

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Yale Law School lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Linda Greenhouse discusses her coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, the conservatives' long game and trends in journalism.

  • Opinion

    Celebrate Veterans By Improving Their Access To Justice

    Linda Klein

    Attorneys should think beyond the Veterans Day parades and use their time and talents to help the many veterans facing urgent legal issues, says Linda Klein of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.

  • Opinion

    Time To Reclaim Wellness For All Lawyers

    Leesa Klepper

    The decision last month by Baker McKenzie’s global chairman to step down due to exhaustion indicates that the legal profession needs to mount a broader wellness effort to address long hours, high stress, frequent travel and the daily demands of practice, says Leesa Klepper, director of Thrivewell Coaching.

  • Roundup Verdict Points To Jury Realities In Product Cases

    Matthew Gatewood

    A California jury was recently asked to determine whether the popular herbicide Roundup causes cancer. The case demonstrates how jurors often must draw conclusions on unresolved scientific issues, and how manufacturers that ignore complaints about product risks will struggle to overcome the image of corporate irresponsibility at trial, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland LLP.

  • 5th Circ. Weighs In On Sentencing Enhancements

    Mario Nguyen

    ​​Escaping sentencing enhancements​ is​ highly unlikely, and the defendant convicted of bank fraud in U.S. v. Miller is no exception​.​ But​ ​t​he Fifth Circuit’s opinion clarifies some legal standards and provides insight into the application of ​these ​enhancements​, says Mario Nguyen of Locke Lord LLP.